Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
13 "Social class"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Original Articles
Effects of Income Level on the Association Between Hypertension and Depression: 2010-2017 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
San Kang, Hyeon Chang Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(6):439-446.   Published online October 8, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.337
  • 3,961 View
  • 144 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study analyzed the associations of hypertension (HTN) with symptoms and diagnosis of depression by income level among Korean adults.
Methods
This study was based on the 2010-2017 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data; a total of 29 425 adults (aged 20 years or older) were analyzed. HTN was defined as a systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mmHg, or use of hypertensive medications. Depression symptoms were evaluated based on a questionnaire about depression-related symptoms. A depression diagnosis was defined based on questionnaire responses indicating that a participant had been diagnosed with depression. Household income was divided into higher or lower income ranges based on the median income of the participants. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the associations between HTN and depression symptoms/diagnosis in the higher-income and lower-income groups.
Results
In the higher-income group, the odds ratio (OR) for the association between HTN and depression symptoms was 1.15 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97 to 1.37), and the OR for the association between HTN and depression diagnosis was 1.41 (95% CI, 1.13 to 1.76). In the lower-income group, the OR for the association between HTN and depression symptoms was 1.18 (95% CI, 1.04 to 1.34), whereas the OR for the association between HTN and depression diagnosis was 0.82 (95% CI, 0.70 to 0.97).
Conclusions
The associations of HTN with symptoms and diagnosis of depression differed by income level.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Impacts of Anxiety and Depression on Clinical Hypertension in Low-Income US Adults
    Rohan M. Shah, Sahil Doshi, Sareena Shah, Shiv Patel, Angela Li, Joseph A. Diamond
    High Blood Pressure & Cardiovascular Prevention.2023; 30(4): 337.     CrossRef
  • Machine learning-based predictive modeling of depression in hypertensive populations
    Chiyoung Lee, Heewon Kim, Gennady S. Cymbalyuk
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(7): e0272330.     CrossRef
  • The Association between Plasma Concentration of Phytoestrogens and Hypertension within the Korean Multicenter Cancer Cohort
    Juyeon Lee, Ju-Young Kang, Kwang-Pil Ko, Sue-Kyung Park
    Nutrients.2021; 13(12): 4366.     CrossRef
Measuring and Decomposing Socioeconomic Inequalities in Adult Obesity in Western Iran
Farid Najafi, Yahya Pasdar, Behrooz Hamzeh, Satar Rezaei, Mehdi Moradi Nazar, Moslem Soofi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(6):289-297.   Published online October 29, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.062
  • 6,689 View
  • 179 Download
  • 15 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Obesity is a considerable and growing public health concern worldwide. The present study aimed to quantify socioeconomic inequalities in adult obesity in western Iran.
Methods
A total of 10 086 participants, aged 35-65 years, from the Ravansar Non-communicable Disease Cohort Study (2014-2016) were included in the study to examine socioeconomic inequalities in obesity. We defined obesity as a body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 . The concentration index and concentration curve were used to illustrate and measure wealth-related inequality in obesity. Additionally, we decomposed the concentration index to identify factors that explained wealth-related inequality in obesity.
Results
Overall, the prevalence of obesity in the total sample was 26.7%. The concentration index of obesity was 0.04; indicating that obesity was more concentrated among the rich (p<0.001). Decomposition analysis indicated that wealth, place of residence, and marital status were the main contributors to the observed inequality in obesity.
Conclusions
Socioeconomic-related inequalities in obesity among adults warrant more attention. Policies should be designed to reduce both the prevalence of obesity and inequalities in obesity by focusing on those with higher socioeconomic status, urban residents, and married individuals.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Worse becomes the worst: obesity inequality, its determinants and policy options in Iran
    Fatemeh Toorang, Parisa Amiri, Abolghassem Djazayery, Hamed Pouraram, Amirhossein Takian
    Frontiers in Public Health.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic inequality and urban-rural disparity of antenatal care visits in Bangladesh: A trend and decomposition analysis
    Biplab Biswas, Nishith Kumar, Md. Matiur Rahaman, Sukanta Das, Md. Aminul Hoque, Benojir Ahammed
    PLOS ONE.2024; 19(3): e0301106.     CrossRef
  • Measuring socioeconomic inequalities in postnatal health checks for newborns in Ethiopia: a decomposition analysis
    Asebe Hagos, Misganaw Guadie Tiruneh, Kaleab Mesfin Abera, Yawkal Tsega, Abel Endawkie, Wubshet Debebe Negash, Amare Mesfin Workie, Lamrot Yohannes, Mihret Getnet, Nigusu Worku, Adina Yeshambel Belay, Lakew Asmare, Hiwot Tadesse Alemu, Demiss Mulatu Geber
    Frontiers in Public Health.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Measurement and Decomposition of Socioeconomic Inequality in Metabolic Syndrome: A Cross-sectional Analysis of the RaNCD Cohort Study in the West of Iran
    Moslem Soofi, Farid Najafi, Shahin Soltani, Behzad Karamimatin
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2023; 56(1): 50.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of overweight and obesity among Iranian population: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Behnaz Abiri, Amirhossein Ramezani Ahmadi, Shirin Amini, Mojtaba Akbari, Farhad Hosseinpanah, Seyed Ataollah Madinehzad, Mahdi Hejazi, Amirreza Pouladi Rishehri, Alvand Naserghandi, Majid Valizadeh
    Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of a pro-inflammatory diet with type 2 diabetes and hypertension: results from the Ravansar non-communicable diseases cohort study
    Samira Arbabi Jam, Shahab Rezaeian, Farid Najafi, Behrooz Hamzeh, Ebrahim Shakiba, Mehdi Moradinazar, Mitra Darbandi, Fatemeh Hichi, Sareh Eghtesad, Yahya Pasdar
    Archives of Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Decomposition of Socioeconomic Inequality in Cardiovascular Disease Prevalence in the Adult Population: A Cohort-based Cross-sectional Study in Northwest Iran
    Farhad Pourfarzi, Telma Zahirian Moghadam, Hamed Zandian
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2022; 55(3): 297.     CrossRef
  • The socio-economic inequality in body mass index: a PERSIAN cohort-based cross-sectional study on 20,000 Iranian adults
    Farhad Pourfarzi, Satar Rezaei, Telma Zahirian Moghadam, Hamed Zandian, Foad Dibazar
    BMC Endocrine Disorders.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Assessing the income-related inequality in obesity among the elderly in China: A decomposition analysis
    Jinpeng Xu, Guomei Tian, Ting Zhang, Hongyu Zhang, Jian Liu, Qi Shi, Jiale Sun, Haixin Wang, Bokai Zhang, Qunhong Wu, Zheng Kang
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic disparities in using rehabilitation services among Iranian adults with disabilities: a decomposition analysis
    Shahin Soltani, Marzieh Mohammadi Moghadam, Shiva Amani, Shahram Akbari, Amir Shiani, Moslem Soofi
    BMC Health Services Research.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Establishing hematological reference intervals in healthy adults: Ravansar non‐communicable disease cohort study, Iran
    Mehdi Moradinazar, Farid Najafi, Yahya Pasdar, Behrooz Hamzeh, Ebrahim Shakiba, Mary Kathryn Bohn, Khosrow Adeli, Zohreh Rahimi
    International Journal of Laboratory Hematology.2021; 43(2): 199.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic - related inequalities in overweight and obesity: findings from the PERSIAN cohort study
    Farid Najafi, Shahin Soltani, Behzad Karami Matin, Ali Kazemi Karyani, Satar Rezaei, Moslem Soofi, Yahya Salimi, Mehdi Moradinazar, Mohammad Hajizadeh, Loghman Barzegar, Yahya Pasdar, Behrooz Hamzeh, Ali Akbar Haghdoost, Reza Malekzadeh, Hossein Poustchi,
    BMC Public Health.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of all forms of malnutrition and socioeconomic status, educational level and ethnicity in Colombian children and non-pregnant women
    Gustavo Cediel, Eliana Perez, Diego Gaitán, Olga L Sarmiento, Laura Gonzalez
    Public Health Nutrition.2020; 23(S1): s51.     CrossRef
  • Türkiye’de Kadınlarda Obezite Üzerine Sosyoekonomik Faktörlerin Etkisi ve Gelir Eşitsizliği
    Banu BEYAZ SİPAHİ
    Gaziantep University Journal of Social Sciences.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic inequalities in obesity in Brazil
    Lívia Madeira Triaca, Anderson Moreira Aristides dos Santos, Cesar Augusto Oviedo Tejada
    Economics & Human Biology.2020; 39: 100906.     CrossRef
Socioeconomic Inequalities in the Oral Health of People Aged 15-40 Years in Kurdistan, Iran in 2015: A Cross-sectional Study
Ghobad Moradi, Ardavan Moinafshar, Hemen Adabi, Mona Sharafi, Farideh Mostafavi, Amjad Mohamadi Bolbanabad
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(5):303-310.   Published online July 25, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.035
  • 6,740 View
  • 189 Download
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The aim of this study was to evaluate socioeconomic inequalities in the prevalence of dental caries among an urban population. Methods: This study was conducted among 2000 people 15-40 years of age living in Kurdistan, Iran in 2015. Using a questionnaire, data were collected by 4 trained dental students. The dependent variable was the decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMF) index. Using principal component analysis, the socioeconomic status (SES) of families was determined based on their household assets. Inequality was measured using the concentration index; in addition, the Oaxaca analytical method was used to determine the contribution of various determinants to the observed inequality. Results: The concentration index for poor scores on the DMF index was -0.32 (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.40 to -0.36); thus, poor DMF indices had a greater concentration in groups with a low SES (p<0.001). Decomposition analysis showed that the mean prevalence of a poor DMF index was 43.7% (95% CI, 40.4 to 46.9%) in the least privileged group and 14.4% (95% CI, 9.5 to 9.2%) in the most privileged group. It was found that 85.8% of the gap observed between these groups was due to differences in sex, parents’ education, and the district of residence. A poor DMF index was less prevalent among people with higher SES than among those with lower SES (odds ratio, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.19 to 0.52). Conclusions: An alarming degree of SES inequality in oral health status was found in the studied community. Hence, it is suggested that inequalities in oral health status be reduced via adopting appropriate policies such as the delivery of oral health services to poorer groups and covering such services in insurance programs.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The prevalence of seat belt use among drivers and passengers: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Shiva Kargar, Alireza Ansari-Moghaddam, Hossein Ansari
    Journal of the Egyptian Public Health Association.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Utilization of dental care among adult populations: a scoping review of applied models
    Ashkan Negintaji Zardak, Mostafa Amini-Rarani, Ibrahim Abdollahpour, Faezeh Eslamipour, Bahareh Tahani
    BMC Oral Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • AİLENİN EKONOMİK DURUMUNUN ÇOCUKLARIN DİŞ VE AĞIZ SAĞLIĞI ÜZERİNE ETKİSİNİN İNCELENMESİ
    Ramazan İNCİ, Veysel ERATİLLA
    İnönü Üniversitesi Sağlık Hizmetleri Meslek Yüksek Okulu Dergisi.2023; 11(3): 1816.     CrossRef
  • Investigation of the awareness status of HIV/AIDS and socioeconomic inequalities in women 15–54 years old in Iran: study of Iran’s Multiple Indicator Demographic and Health Survey (IrMIDHS)
    Ghobad Moradi, Elham Goodarzi, Ardeshir Khosravi, Farideh Mostafavi, Yousef Veisani
    Journal of Public Health.2021; 29(5): 1143.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic Inequality in Dental Caries Experience Expressed by the Significant Caries Index: Cross-Sectional Results From the RaNCD Cohort Study
    Moslem Soofi, Behzad Karami-Matin, Ali Kazemi-Karyani, Shahin Soltani, Hosein Ameri, Mehdi Moradi-Nazar, Farid Najafi
    International Dental Journal.2021; 71(2): 153.     CrossRef
  • Evaluating the quality of care for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus based on the HbA1c: A national survey in Iran
    Ghobad Moradi, Azad Shokri, Amjad Mohamadi-Bolbanabad, Bushra Zareie, Bakhtiar Piroozi
    Heliyon.2021; 7(3): e06485.     CrossRef
  • Catastrophic health expenditures for children with disabilities in Iran: A national survey
    Ghobad Moradi, Amjad Mohamadi Bolbanabad, Farman Zahir Abdullah, Hossein Safari, Satar Rezaei, Abbas Aghaei, Siros Hematpour, Salahaddin Farshadi, Nima Naleini, Bakhtiar Piroozi
    The International Journal of Health Planning and Management.2021; 36(5): 1861.     CrossRef
  • Inequality in dental care expenditure in Iranian households: analysis of income quintiles and educational levels
    Elahe Najafi, Mostafa Amini-Rarani, Maryam Moeeni
    BMC Oral Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Oral Health Behaviors among Schoolchildren in Western Iran: Determinants and Inequality


    Satar Rezaei, Halasa-Rappel Yara A.
    Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dentistry.2020; Volume 12: 319.     CrossRef
  • Incidence and Intensity of Catastrophic Health-care Expenditure for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Care in Iran: Determinants and Inequality


    Bakhtiar Piroozi, Amjad Mohamadi-Bolbanabad, Ghobad Moradi, Hossein Safari, Shahnaz Ghafoori, Yadolah Zarezade, Farzam Bidarpour, Satar Rezaei
    Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy.2020; Volume 13: 2865.     CrossRef
  • Decomposing socioeconomic inequality in dental caries in Iran: cross-sectional results from the PERSIAN cohort study
    Farid Najafi, Satar Rezaei, Mohammad Hajizadeh, Moslem Soofi, Yahya Salimi, Ali Kazemi Karyani, Shahin Soltani, Sina Ahmadi, Enayatollah Homaie Rad, Behzad Karami Matin, Yahya Pasdar, Behrooz Hamzeh, Mehdi Moradi Nazar, Ali Mohammadi, Hossein Poustchi, Na
    Archives of Public Health.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Risk factors for tooth loss in community-dwelling Japanese aged 40 years and older: the Yamagata (Takahata) study
    Shigeo Ishikawa, Tsuneo Konta, Shinji Susa, Kenichiro Kitabatake, Kenichi Ishizawa, Hitoshi Togashi, Atsushi Tsuya, Yoshiyuki Ueno, Isao Kubota, Hidetoshi Yamashita, Takamasa Kayama, Mitsuyoshi Iino
    Clinical Oral Investigations.2019; 23(4): 1753.     CrossRef
  • Catastrophic health expenditure and its determinants in households with gastrointestinal cancer patients: evidence from new health system reform in Iran
    Bakhtiar Piroozi, Bushra Zarei, Bayazid Ghaderi, Hossein Safari, Ghobad Moradi, Satar Rezaei, Mahfooz Ghaderi, Shina Amirhosseini, Amjad Mohamadi-Bolbanabad
    International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare.2019; 12(4): 249.     CrossRef
  • Reducing social inequalities in the oral health of an adult population
    Manoelito Ferreira SILVA JUNIOR, Maria da Luz Rosário de SOUSA, Marília Jesus BATISTA
    Brazilian Oral Research.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Age-sex specific and sequela-specific disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) due to dental caries preventable through water fluoridation: An assessment at the national and subnational levels in Iran, 2016
    Mehrnoosh Abtahi, Sina Dobaradaran, Sahand Jorfi, Ali Koolivand, Mohammad Reza Mohebbi, Ahmad Montazeri, Shokooh Sadat Khaloo, Saeed Keshmiri, Reza Saeedi
    Environmental Research.2018; 167: 372.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic status, oral health and dental disease in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States
    Gloria C. Mejia, Hawazin W. Elani, Sam Harper, W. Murray Thomson, Xiangqun Ju, Ichiro Kawachi, Jay S. Kaufman, Lisa M. Jamieson
    BMC Oral Health.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
The Impact of Educational Status on 10-Year (2004-2014) Cardiovascular Disease Prognosis and All-cause Mortality Among Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients in the Greek Acute Coronary Syndrome (GREECS) Longitudinal Study
Venetia Notara, Demosthenes B. Panagiotakos, Yannis Kogias, Petros Stravopodis, Antonis Antonoulas, Spyros Zombolos, Yannis Mantas, Christos Pitsavos
J Prev Med Public Health. 2016;49(4):220-229.   Published online June 24, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.16.005
  • 9,618 View
  • 131 Download
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The association between educational status and 10-year risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and all-cause mortality was evaluated.
Methods
From October 2003 to September 2004, 2172 consecutive ACS patients from six Greek hospitals were enrolled. In 2013 to 2014, a 10-year follow-up (2004-2014) assessment was performed for 1918 participants (participation rate, 88%). Each patient’s educational status was classified as low (<9 years of school), intermediate (9 to 14 years), or high (>14 years).
Results
Overall all-cause mortality was almost twofold higher in the low-education group than in the intermediate-education and high-education groups (40% vs. 22% and 19%, respectively, p<0.001). Additionally, 10-year recurrent ACS events (fatal and non-fatal) were more common in the low-education group than in the intermediate-education and high-education groups (42% vs. 30% and 35%, p<0.001), and no interactions between sex and education on the investigated outcomes were observed. Moreover, patients in the high-education group were more physically active, had a better financial status, and were less likely to have hypertension, diabetes, or ACS than the participants with the least education (p<0.001); however, when those characteristics and lifestyle habits were accounted for, no moderating effects regarding the relationship of educational status with all-cause mortality and ACS events were observed.
Conclusions
A U-shaped association may be proposed for the relationship between ACS prognosis and educational status, with participants in the low-education and high-education groups being negatively affected by other factors (e.g., job stress, depression, or loneliness). Public health policies should be aimed at specific social groups to reduce the overall burden of cardiovascular disease morbidity.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Time-Dependent Risk for Recurrence in Survivors of Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events
    Anderson Bermon, Belem Trejo-Valdivia, Carlos Federico Molina Castaño, Angela M Segura, Norma C Serrano
    Cureus.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Temporal trends in socioeconomic disparity in clinical outcomes for patients with acute coronary syndrome
    Amalie H. Simoni, Jan B. Valentin, Kristian H. Kragholm, Henrik Bøggild, Svend E. Jensen, Søren P. Johnsen
    Cardiovascular Revascularization Medicine.2023; 56: 64.     CrossRef
  • Associations of Recreational and Nonrecreational Physical Activity and Body Weight Change on Cardiovascular Disease Mortality During the Obesogenic Transition in the United States: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Follow-up Study
    Birinder S. Cheema, Zumin Shi, Rhiannon L. White, Evan Atlantis
    Journal of Physical Activity and Health.2023; 20(10): 971.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic inequity in incidence, outcomes and care for acute coronary syndrome: A systematic review
    Amalie H. Simoni, Juliane Frydenlund, Kristian H. Kragholm, Henrik Bøggild, Svend E. Jensen, Søren P. Johnsen
    International Journal of Cardiology.2022; 356: 19.     CrossRef
  • Low educational status correlates with a high incidence of mortality among hypertensive subjects from Northeast Rural China
    Shasha Yu, Xiaofan Guo, GuangXiao Li, Hongmei Yang, Liqiang Zheng, Yingxian Sun
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Adherence to the Mediterranean diet according to occupation-based social classifications and gender
    Carlos Álvarez-Fernández, Manuel Romero-Saldaña, Álvaro Álvarez-López, Rafael Molina-Luque, Guillermo Molina-Recio, Manuel Vaquero-Abellán
    Archives of Environmental & Occupational Health.2021; 76(5): 275.     CrossRef
  • Irrational beliefs trigger depression and anxiety symptoms, and associated with increased inflammation and oxidative stress markers in the 10-year diabetes mellitus risk: the ATTICA epidemiological study
    Christina Vassou, Ekavi N. Georgousopoulou, Christina Chrysohoou, Mary Yannakoulia, Christos Pitsavos, Mark Cropley, Demosthenes B. Panagiotakos
    Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders.2021; 20(1): 727.     CrossRef
  • Association between Educational Level and Physical Activity in Chronic Disease Patients of Eastern Slovakia
    Alena Buková, Erika Chovanová, Zuzana Küchelová, Jan Junger, Agata Horbacz, Mária Majherová, Silvia Duranková
    Healthcare.2021; 9(11): 1447.     CrossRef
  • Trajectories of Outpatient Service Utilisation of Hypertensive Patients in Tertiary Hospitals in China
    Zijing Pan, Wanchun Xu, Zhong Li, Chengzhong Xu, Fangfang Lu, Pei Zhang, Liang Zhang, Ting Ye
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(3): 852.     CrossRef
  • Positive Association of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) with Chronic Exposure to Drinking Water Arsenic (As) at Concentrations below the WHO Provisional Guideline Value: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
    Lingqian Xu, Debapriya Mondal, David A. Polya
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(7): 2536.     CrossRef
  • Association of low-level inorganic arsenic exposure from rice with age-standardized mortality risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in England and Wales
    Lingqian Xu, David A. Polya, Qian Li, Debapriya Mondal
    Science of The Total Environment.2020; 743: 140534.     CrossRef
  • Relevant problems of participation and education of patients in cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention programs
    M. G. Bubnova
    Cardiovascular Therapy and Prevention.2020; 19(6): 2649.     CrossRef
  • Study of awareness of risk factors and attitudes towards health in patients with coronary heart disease. New rehabilitation counseling technology: the first experience
    M. G. Bubnova, D. M. Aronov, N. K. Novikova, E. M. Rodzinskaya, A. L. Persiyanova-Dubrova
    Profilakticheskaya meditsina.2019; 22(4): 114.     CrossRef
  • Association between educational level and total and cause-specific mortality: a pooled analysis of over 694 000 individuals in the Asia Cohort Consortium
    Keming Yang, Ying Zhang, Eiko Saito, Md Shafiur Rahman, Prakash Chandra Gupta, Norie Sawada, Akiko Tamakoshi, Yu-Tang Gao, Woon-Puay Koh, Xiao-Ou Shu, Ichiro Tsuji, Atsuko Sadakane, Chisato Nagata, San-Lin You, Jian-Min Yuan, Myung-Hee Shin, Yu Chen, Wen-
    BMJ Open.2019; 9(8): e026225.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and risk factors for prehypertension and hypertension among adults in Central China from 2000-2011
    Chaoying Chen, Zhanpeng Yuan
    Clinical and Experimental Hypertension.2018; 40(8): 734.     CrossRef
  • The risk factors of 9-year follow-up on hypertension in middle-aged people in Tujia-Nationality settlement of China
    X Liu, C Liu, H Schenck, X Yi, H Wang, X Shi
    Journal of Human Hypertension.2017; 31(12): 838.     CrossRef
Factors Determining Children’s Private Health Insurance Enrolment and Healthcare Utilization Patterns: Evidence From the 2008 to 2011 Health Panel Data
Jawoon Shin, Tae-Jin Lee, Sung-il Cho, Seung Ah Choe
J Prev Med Public Health. 2015;48(6):319-329.   Published online November 16, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.15.057
  • 9,336 View
  • 104 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Parental socioeconomic status (SES) exerts a substantial influence on children’s health. The purpose of this study was to examine factors determining children’s private health insurance (PHI) enrolment and children’s healthcare utilization according to PHI coverage.
Methods
Korea Health Panel data from 2011 (n=3085) was used to explore the factors determining PHI enrolment in children younger than 15 years of age. A logit model contained health status and SES variables for both children and parents. A fixed effects model identified factors influencing healthcare utilization in children aged 10 years or younger, using 2008 to 2011 panel data (n=9084).
Results
The factors determining children’s PHI enrolment included children’s age and sex and parents’ educational status, employment status, and household income quintile. PHI exerted a significant effect on outpatient cost, inpatient cost, and number of admissions. Number of outpatient visits and total length of stay were not affected by PHI status. The interaction between PHI and age group increased outpatient cost significantly.
Conclusions
Children’s PHI enrolment was influenced by parents’ SES, while healthcare utilization was affected by health and disability status. Therefore, the results of this study suggest disparities in healthcare utilization according to PHI enrollment.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Uptake and determinants of private health insurance enrollment in a country with heavily subsidised public healthcare: A cross-sectional survey in East Coast Malaysia
    Mohd Adli Abd Khalim, Surianti Sukeri, Gopal Ashish Sharma
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(1): e0278404.     CrossRef
  • Equity in the public social healthcare protection in Tanzania: does it matter on household healthcare financing?
    Felician Andrew Kitole, Robert Michael Lihawa, Eliaza Mkuna
    International Journal for Equity in Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Does health insurance solve health care utilization puzzle in Tanzania?
    Felician Andrew Kitole, Robert Michael Lihawa, Thobias Edward Nsindagi, Felister Y. Tibamanya
    Public Health.2023; 219: 91.     CrossRef
  • Enrollment in Private Medical Insurance and Utilization of Medical Services Among Children and Adolescents: Data From the 2009-2012 Korea Health Panel Surveys
    Dong Hee Ryu, Sin Kam, Young-Taek Doo
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2016; 49(2): 118.     CrossRef
Variation in Meal-skipping Rates of Korean Adolescents According to Socio-economic Status: Results of the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey
Seri Hong, Hong Chul Bae, Hyun Soo Kim, Eun-Cheol Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2014;47(3):158-168.   Published online May 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2014.47.3.158
  • 11,412 View
  • 83 Download
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

To identify and evaluate the trend of meal-skipping rates among Korean adolescents with their contributing causes and the influence of household income level on meal skipping.

Methods

Using 2008, 2010, and 2012 data from the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey of 222 662 students, a cross-sectional study with subgroup analysis was performed. We calculated odds ratios for skipping each meal 5 or more times in a week by household socio-economic status using a multiple logistic regression model. The secular change in the meal-skipping rates by the students' family affluence scale was analyzed by comparing the meal-skipping students within each subgroup and odds ratios for the same event over time.

Results

Through 2008 to 2012, most of the meal-skipping rates generally showed a continuous increase or were almost unchanged in both sexes, except for breakfast skipping in several subgroups. Students in low-income households not living with both parents had the highest meal-skipping rates and odds ratios for frequent meal skipping. In a time-series subgroup analysis, the overall odds ratios for the same event increased during 2008 to 2012, with a slight reduction in the gap between low and higher income levels with regard to meal skipping during 2010 to 2012.

Conclusions

Household socio-economic status and several other factors had a significant influence on Korean adolescent meal-skipping rates. Although the gap in eating behavior associated with household socio-economic differences is currently decreasing, further study and appropriate interventions are needed.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • National Trends in Sadness, Suicidality, and COVID-19 Pandemic–Related Risk Factors Among South Korean Adolescents From 2005 to 2021
    Ho Geol Woo, Sangil Park, Hyunju Yon, Seung Won Lee, Ai Koyanagi, Louis Jacob, Lee Smith, Wonyoung Cho, Chanyang Min, Jinseok Lee, Hayeon Lee, Rosie Kwon, Guillaume Fond, Laurent Boyer, Yoonie Yoonjung Joo, Yong Sung Choi, Seung-Geun Yeo, Sang Youl Rhee,
    JAMA Network Open.2023; 6(5): e2314838.     CrossRef
  • Association of Household Type and Fast-Food Consumption in Korean Adolescents
    Hwa Sook Kwon, Soo Hyun Kang, Yu Shin Park, Jung Gu Kang, Eun Cheol Park
    Nutrients.2022; 14(15): 3024.     CrossRef
  • Association between family financial decline due to COVID-19 and generalized anxiety disorder among Korean adolescents
    Yun Hwa Jung, Bich Na Jang, Minah Park, Eun-Cheol Park
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2022; 309: 411.     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated with Vitamin D Status Among Korean Female Adolescents
    Ji-Soo Kim
    Journal of Pediatric Nursing.2019; 44: e79.     CrossRef
  • Identifying eating habits in Finnish children: a cross-sectional study
    Rejane Augusta de Oliveira Figueiredo, Jannina Viljakainen, Heli Viljakainen, Eva Roos, Trine B. Rounge, Elisabete Weiderpass
    BMC Public Health.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Family-Based Empowerment on Obesity among Adolescents in Tana Toraja
    R. Erni Yetti, Muhammad Syafar, Andi Zulkifli, Rahayu Indriasari, Burhanuddin Bahar, Suriah ., Agus Bintara Birawida, Bagoes Widjanarko, Zadrak Tombeg, Saskiyanto Manggabara, Anto J. Hadi
    Pakistan Journal of Nutrition.2019; 18(9): 866.     CrossRef
  • Food consumption patterns of adolescents aged 14–16 years in Kolkata, India
    Neha Rathi, Lynn Riddell, Anthony Worsley
    Nutrition Journal.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Regional Disparities in Sedentary Behaviors and Meal Frequency in Iranian Adolescents: The CASPIAN-III Study
    Fereshteh Baygi, Ramin Heshmat, Roya Kelishadi, Fatemeh Mohammadi, Mohammad Esmail Motlagh, Gelayol Ardalan, Hamid Asayesh, Bagher Larijani, Mostafa Qorbani
    Iranian Journal of Pediatrics.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effects of Skipping Breakfast on Nutrition Status, Fatigue Level, and Attention Level among Middle School Students in Gyunggi Province, Korea
    Kyeong Sook Yim
    Journal of the Korean Society of Food Culture.2014; 29(5): 464.     CrossRef
Socioeconomic Status and Number of Children Among Korean Women: The Healthy Twin Study
Jinseob Kim, Joohon Sung
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(1):50-60.   Published online January 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.1.50
  • 8,567 View
  • 75 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study aimed to evaluate whether the birth rate is associated with socioeconomic status in the women of the Republic of Korea, where the birth rate is rapidly decreasing.

Methods

This study included 732 females from the Healthy Twin Study, a family-twin cohort. The participants were classified into 3 socioeconomic groups according to their average income, education, and occupation. The association between socioeconomic status and number of children was assessed using gamma regression analysis with a generalized linear mixed model, adjusting for the age group, smoking/alcohol status, and family relationships.

Results

The group with the highest education level had significantly fewer children compared with the group with the lowest education level (p=0.004). However, no significant associations were found according to household income level. The non-manual labor group had significantly fewer children compared with those working as homemakers (p=0.008).

Conclusions

This study aimed to explain the causal relationship between socioeconomic status and number of children. Associations between some socioeconomic status and number of children were found in Korea.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association between women's empowerment and fertility preferences in Ghana
    Louis Kobina Dadzie, Hilda Yengnone, James Boadu Frimpong, Ebenezer Agbaglo, Abdul-Aziz Seidu, Bright Opoku Ahinkorah
    International Health.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Early Childhood Teachers’ Fertility Willingness under China’s ‘Third-Child’ Policy
    Wei Wang, Luyao Liang, Jing Luo, Hui Li, Jing Tang
    Sustainability.2022; 14(16): 10083.     CrossRef
  • Intent to have a second child among Chinese women of childbearing age following China’s new universal two-child policy: a cross-sectional study
    Jue Liu, Min Liu, Shikun Zhang, Qiuyue Ma, Qiaomei Wang
    BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health.2020; 46(1): 59.     CrossRef
  • The impact of conflict among political actors on implementing South Korea’s new teacher evaluation policy: A case study with implications for education policymaking
    Jisung Yoo
    Studies in Educational Evaluation.2019; 61: 94.     CrossRef
  • Scarcity or luxury: Which leads to adolescent greed? Evidence from a large‐scale Chinese adolescent sample
    Zhenzhen Liu, Xiaomin Sun, Lubsan Tsydypov
    Journal of Adolescence.2019; 77(1): 32.     CrossRef
  • Early life socioeconomic determinants of dietary score and pattern trajectories across six waves of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children
    Constantine E Gasser, Fiona K Mensah, Jessica A Kerr, Melissa Wake
    Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.2017; 71(12): 1152.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic status and fertility intentions among Chinese women with one child
    Yumei Zheng, Jingqin Yuan, Tan Xu, Mei Chen, Hui Liang, Donovan Connor, Yongqing Gao, Wenjie Sun, Nivedita Shankar, Chuanwen Lu, Yan Jiang
    Human Fertility.2016; 19(1): 43.     CrossRef
Social Determinants of Smoking Behavior: The Healthy Twin Study, Korea
Youn Sik Kim, Hansoo Ko, Changgyo Yoon, Dong-Hun Lee, Joohon Sung
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(1):29-36.   Published online January 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.1.29
  • 9,934 View
  • 73 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The purpose of this study was to identify any influence of socioeconomic status on smoking and smoking cessation in a situation where genetic factors are controlled.

Methods

The sample for this study was 2502 members of the twins and families cohort who participated in the Korean Healthy Twins Study from 2005 to 2009. Groups of brothers or sisters, including twins and fraternal twins, were compared in terms of smoking and smoking cessation behaviors according to differences in socioeconomic status and gender.

Results

In a situation with complete control of genetic factors, results showed that the daily smoking amount, cumulative smoking amount, and dependence on nicotine decreased with higher-status occupations, and the rate of smoking and amount of cumulative smoking decreased with higher levels of education. Regarding smoking cessation behavior, a higher level of education was associated with a lower smoking cessation rate, and no significant gender differences were found.

Conclusions

Environmental factors had a stronger influence on smoking behavior than did genetic factors. Genetic factors had greater influence on smoking cessation than did environmental factors; however, this requires verification in further studies.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Interrogating Patterns of Cancer Disparities by Expanding the Social Determinants of Health Framework to Include Biological Pathways of Social Experiences
    Celina I. Valencia, Francine C. Gachupin, Yamilé Molina, Ken Batai
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(4): 2455.     CrossRef
  • Prenatal Tobacco Exposure and the Risk of Tobacco Smoking and Dependence in Offspring: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Bereket Duko, Gavin Pereira, Robert J. Tait, Sylvester Dodzi Nyadanu, Kim Betts, Rosa Alati
    Drug and Alcohol Dependence.2021; 227: 108993.     CrossRef
  • Evolución del tabaquismo según clase social en la población adulta de las Islas Canarias durante el periodo 2000-2015: seguimiento de la cohorte CDC-Canarias
    Francisco Javier Cuevas Fernández, María José Iglesias Girón, María del Cristo Rodríguez Pérez, Silvia Ortiz Simarro, Antonio Cabrera de León, Armando Aguirre-Jaime
    Atención Primaria.2020; 52(6): 381.     CrossRef
  • Socio-economic contributors to current cigarette smoking among Iranian household heads: findings from a national household survey
    Mohammad Reza Masjedi, Payam Roshanfekr, Seyran Naghdi, Peter Higgs, Bahram Armoon, Sonya Ghaffari, Hesam Ghiasvand
    Journal of Substance Use.2020; 25(2): 217.     CrossRef
  • Interaction between cytochrome P450 2A6 and Catechol-O-Methyltransferase genes and their association with smoking risk in young men
    Wei-Chih Ou, Yi-Chin Huang, Chih-Ling Huang, Min-Hsuan Lin, Yi-Chun Chen, Yi-Ju Chen, Chen-Nu Liu, Mei-Chih Chen, Ching-Shan Huang, Pei-Lain Chen
    Behavioral and Brain Functions.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of the Rs1051730–Rs16969968 Variant and Smoking Cessation Treatment: A Meta-Analysis
    Tiffany Leung, Andrew Bergen, Marcus Robert Munafò, Kim De Ruyck, Peter Selby, Vincenzo De Luca
    Pharmacogenomics.2015; 16(7): 713.     CrossRef
  • Race and health profiles in the United States: an examination of the social gradient through the 2009 CHIS adult survey
    A.B. Nguyen, R. Moser, W.-Y. Chou
    Public Health.2014; 128(12): 1076.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic status and dyslipidemia in Korean adults: The 2008–2010 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Ga Eun Nam, Kyung Hwan Cho, Yong Gyu Park, Kyung Do Han, Youn Seon Choi, Seon Mee Kim, Kyung Shik Lee, Byung Joon Ko, Yang Hyun Kim, Byoung Duck Han, Do Hoon Kim
    Preventive Medicine.2013; 57(4): 304.     CrossRef
  • Smoking among Individuals with Schizophrenia in Korea: Gender Differences
    Sun S. Kim, Sangkeun Chung, Jong-Il Park, Ae-Ja Jung, David Kalman, Douglas M. Ziedonis
    Archives of Psychiatric Nursing.2013; 27(5): 241.     CrossRef
  • Environmental factors that influence smoking habits of monozygotic and dizygotic twins
    Mónika Bakkné Nagy, Dávid László Tárnoki, Ádám Domonkos Tárnoki
    Orvosi Hetilap.2013; 154(25): 978.     CrossRef
English Abstracts
Socioeconomic Inequity in Self-Rated Health Status and Contribution of Health Behavioral Factors in Korea.
Minkyung Kim, Woojin Chung, Seungji Lim, Soojin Yoon, Jakyoung Lee, Eunkyung Kim, Lanju Ko
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(1):50-61.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.1.50
  • 5,882 View
  • 117 Download
  • 29 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The study is investigated socioeconomic variations in self-rated health status and contribution of health behavioral factors in Korea. METHODS: A nationally representative sample (2,800 men and 3,230 women aged 20-64 years) from the 2005 Korea National Health and Nutrition Surveys was analyzed using logistic regression. RESULTS: Self-rated health was lower among lower socioeconomic groups compared with higher socioeconomic groups, with gender being irrelevant. This association was attenuated when health behavioral and socio-demographic factors were adjusted. When each health behavioral factor was considered separately, mediators such as smoking in men, and stress or exercise in women explained a large part of the decreased socioeconomic health inequalities. CONCLUSIONS: In Korea, subjective health inequalities arise from different socioeconomic status, but this difference is decreased by health behavioral factors. Therefore, socioeconomic inequity in self-rated health status can be corrected more effectively by promotional health behaviors.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Regularity of cervical cancer screening in Korea: analysis using national public data for 12 years
    Jong-Yeup Kim, Jeeyoung Hong, Juhee Yoon, Jinsol Park, Tae-Hyun Kim
    Journal of Gynecologic Oncology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Socio-economic factors and medical conditions affecting regular stomach cancer screening in Korea: a retrospective longitudinal study using national public health data for 11 years
    J.-Y. Kim, J.Y. Hong, S.M. Kim, K.H. Ryu, D.S. Kim, S.H. Lee, J.H. Na, H.H. Cho, J. Yu, J. Lee
    Public Health.2024; 227: 70.     CrossRef
  • Factors Affecting Adherence to National Colorectal Cancer Screening: A 12-Year Longitudinal Study Using Multi-Institutional Pooled Data in Korea
    Dae Sung Kim, Jeeyoung Hong, Kihyun Ryu, Sang Hyuk Lee, Hwanhyi Cho, Jehyeong Yu, Jieun Lee, Jong-Yeup Kim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Sequential Mediating Effects of Dietary Behavior and Perceived Stress on the Relationship between Subjective Socioeconomic Status and Multicultural Adolescent Health
    Youlim Kim, Hyeonkyeong Lee, Mikyung Lee, Hyeyeon Lee, Sookyung Kim, Kennedy Diema Konlan
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(7): 3604.     CrossRef
  • Health Literacy and Related Factors Depending on Socioeconomic Status
    Yoon Jin Oh, Ki Hyun Park
    Korean Journal of Family Practice.2021; 11(4): 280.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Nutrient Intake and Diet Assessment according to the Subjective Health Perception and Disease Existence : The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Data(2013~2017) Analysis
    Yi-Na Yoon, Bok-Mi Jung
    The Korean Journal of Community Living Science.2021; 32(3): 395.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Health Status in Primary Care Underserved Area Residents and the General Population in Korea
    Min So Kim, Kyae Hyung Kim, Sang Min Park, Jong-goo Lee, Yeon Seo Ko, A Ra Cho, Yoon Su Ku
    Korean Journal of Family Medicine.2020; 41(2): 119.     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated with the Health Literacy on Social Determinants of Health: A Focus on Socioeconomic Position and Work Environment
    Mikyeong Cho, Young-Me Lee, Seung joo Lim, Hyeonkyeong Lee
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(18): 6663.     CrossRef
  • Changes in poor self‐rated health status among elderly Koreans over 10 years: Community Health Survey 2008–2017
    Jin‐Gyu Jung, Seok‐Joon Yoon, Soon‐Ki Ahn, Jong‐Sung Kim, Hae‐Sung Nam, Bon Jeong Ku, Ho Kim, In‐Sun Kwon
    Geriatrics & Gerontology International.2020; 20(12): 1190.     CrossRef
  • Multilevel Analysis of Factors Associated with Perceived Good Health and Multimorbidity among Older Adults: Using the 2017 Community Health Survey
    Sunjoo Boo, Young Ran Han, Hye Young Choi
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2020; 31(Suppl): 549.     CrossRef
  • Working Poverty and Health Disparities in Korean Workers
    Jin-Hwa Lee, Bokim Lee
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2020; 31(4): 514.     CrossRef
  • Association between energy intake and skeletal muscle mass according to dietary patterns derived by cluster analysis: data from the 2008 ~ 2010 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Bo Young Jang, So Young Bu
    Journal of Nutrition and Health.2019; 52(6): 581.     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated with Perceived Depression of Korean Adults: Secondary Data from the Korean Community Health Survey
    Mi-Ra Won, Me-Sun Ahn, Yun-Jung Choi
    Community Mental Health Journal.2017; 53(3): 288.     CrossRef
  • Neo-Marxian social class inequalities in self-rated health among the employed in South Korea: the role of material, behavioral, psychosocial, and workplace environmental factors
    Kyoung Ae Kong, Young-Ho Khang, Hong-Jun Cho, Sung-Mi Jang, Kyunghee Jung-Choi
    BMC Public Health.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Health Behavior and Status according to Household Income Level in Korean Women Aged 35 Years or Older: the 2013 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Min-Jeong Oh, Yun-Jin Kim, Jeong-Gyu Lee, Yu-Hyeon Yi, Young-Jin Tak, Hye-Rim Hwang, Seung-Hoon Lee
    Korean Journal of Health Promotion.2017; 17(1): 20.     CrossRef
  • Associations Between Preschool Education Experiences and Adulthood Self-rated Health
    Jeehye Lee, Jinwook Bahk, Young-Ho Khang
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2017; 50(4): 228.     CrossRef
  • Income gaps in self-rated poor health and its association with life expectancy in 245 districts of Korea
    Ikhan Kim, Jinwook Bahk, Sung-Cheol Yun, Young-Ho Khang
    Epidemiology and Health.2017; 39: e2017011.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Working Environment and Socioeconomic Status on Health Status in Elderly Workers: A Comparison with Non-Elderly Workers
    Bokim Lee
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2017; 28(4): 472.     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated with Non-Participation in Health Screening for People with Disabilities
    Seok-Yeong Kim, Jung-Chan Lee, Byeung-Ki An, Yang-Kyun Kim
    The Korean Journal of Health Service Management.2017; 11(4): 89.     CrossRef
  • The Optimal Cut Off Score According to Self-Rated Health in Early Adulthood
    Yun-Young Kim, Eun-Su Jang
    The Korean Journal of Health Service Management.2017; 11(2): 105.     CrossRef
  • Differences between middle-aged and older people in association between income level and remaining teeth
    Sun-Yi Kim, Jeong-Keun Lee, Yun-Hwan Lee, Ki-Hong Chun
    Journal of Korean Academy of Oral Health.2016; 40(1): 9.     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated with Poor Glycemic Control among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2010-2012)
    Jinhyun Park, Seungji Lim, Eunshil Yim, Youngdae Kim, Woojin Chung
    Health Policy and Management.2016; 26(2): 125.     CrossRef
  • Self-rated Health and Health Service Utilization of Chronic disease Patients
    Eun-Ju Park
    The Journal of Korea Institute of Information, Electronics, and Communication Technology.2016; 9(4): 404.     CrossRef
  • Health Disparities among Korean Workers by Enterprise Size: Using Korean Labor and Income Panel Study (17th)
    Bohyun Park, Sook Ja Choi, Sukyong Seo
    Korean Journal of Occupational Health Nursing.2016; 25(4): 277.     CrossRef
  • A panel study to examine the impact of multidimensional poverty on Korean adolescents' health
    Jung-Eun Kim, Won-Hong Min, Bong Joo Lee, In Hoe Ku
    Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development.2015; 25(3): 145.     CrossRef
  • The Factors Related to the Non-Practice of Cancer Screening in Cancer Survivors: Based on the 2007-2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Song-Ei Yang, Nam-Kyung Han, Sun-Mi Lee, Tae-Hyun Kim, Woojin Chung
    Health Policy and Management.2015; 25(3): 162.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic inequalities in health status in Korea
    Kyunghee Jung-Choi, Yu-Mi Kim
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2013; 56(3): 167.     CrossRef
  • The Relationship between Smoking, Alcohol Drinking, and Parenting Behavior Perceived by Adolescents
    Yun Ho Roh, Eun Joo Kim
    Korean Journal of Health Education and Promotion.2013; 30(2): 71.     CrossRef
  • Difference in Health-related Quality of Life among Social Classes and Related Factors in Korea
    Gyeong-Tae Lim, In-Sun Kwon, Soon-Young Kim, Young-Chae Cho, Hea-Sung Nam
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2012; 13(5): 2189.     CrossRef
Trend of Socioeconomic Inequality in Participation in Cervical Cancer Screening among Korean Women.
Soong Nang Jang, Sung il Cho, Seung Sik Hwang, Kyunghee Jung-Choi, So Young Im, Ji Ae Lee, Minah Kang Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(6):505-511.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.6.505
  • 5,310 View
  • 74 Download
  • 15 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
While cervical cancer is one of the leading cancers among women worldwide, there are a number of effective early detection tests available. However, the participation rates in cervical cancer screening among Korean women remain low. After the nationwide efforts in 1988 and thereafter to encourage participation in cervical cancer screening, few studies have investigated the effects of socioeconomic inequality on participation in cervical cancer screening. The purpose of this study was to investigate 1) the level of socioeconomic disparities in receiving cervical cancer screening by age group and 2) if there was an improvement in reducing these disparities between 1995 and 2001. METHODS: Using data from the Korean National Health Status, Health Behavior and Belief Survey in 1995, and the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys from 1998 and 2001 (sample sizes of 2,297, 3,738, and 3,283), age-standardized participation rates were calculated according to education level, equivalized household income, and job status. Odds ratios and the relative inequality index (RII) were also calculated after controlling for age. RESULTS: Women with lower education levels were less likely to attend the screening test, and the disparities by education level were most pronounced among women aged 60 years and older. The RIIs among women 60 years and older were 3.64, 4.46, and 8.64 in 1995, 1998, and 2001, respectively. Higher rates of participation were reported among those in the highest income category, which was more notable among the middle aged women (40s and 50s). An inconsistent trend in the rate of participation in cervical cancer screening by occupational level was found. CONCLUSIONS: Indicators of socioeconomic position seem to have varying impacts on the inequalities in the rates of participation in cervical cancer screening according to age group. These results demonstrate the need for more aggressive and age-based interventions and policy programs to eliminate the remaining inequalities.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Factors Influencing the of Middle-Aged Men the NCSP(National Cancer Screening Program)
    Geum-Ja Park, Kyoung-Min Lim, Sook-Nam Kim
    The Korean Journal of Health Service Management.2016; 10(3): 51.     CrossRef
  • Educational Inequality in Female Cancer Mortality in Korea
    Mi-Hyun Kim, Kyunghee Jung-Choi, Hyoeun Kim, Yun-Mi Song
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2015; 30(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Determinants of gastric cancer screening attendance in Korea: a multi-level analysis
    Yunryong Chang, Belong Cho, Ki Young Son, Dong Wook Shin, Hosung Shin, Hyung-Kook Yang, Aesun Shin, Keun-Young Yoo
    BMC Cancer.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Relationship between Socioeconomic Status and Gastric Cancer Screening in the Population of a Metropolitan Area
    Hyun-Suk Oh, Sun A Kim, Sun-Seog Kweon, Jung-Ae Rhee, So-Yeon Ryu, Min-Ho Shin
    Journal of agricultural medicine and community health.2013; 38(3): 174.     CrossRef
  • Equity in health care: current situation in South Korea
    Hong-Jun Cho
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2013; 56(3): 184.     CrossRef
  • Trends in Cervical Cancer Mortality by Socioeconomic Status in Korean Women between 1998 and 2009
    Mi-Hyun Kim, Yun-Mi Song, Bo-Kyoung Kim, Sung-Min Park, Gwang Pyo Ko
    Korean Journal of Family Medicine.2013; 34(4): 258.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic disparity in cervical cancer screening among Korean women: 1998–2010
    Minjee Lee, Eun-Cheol Park, Hoo-Sun Chang, Jeoung A Kwon, Ki Bong Yoo, Tae Hyun Kim
    BMC Public Health.2013;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Predictors Associated with Repeated Papanicolaou Smear for Cervical Cancer Screening
    Eun-Joo Lee, Jeong-Sook Park
    Asian Oncology Nursing.2013; 13(1): 28.     CrossRef
  • Regional Factors Associated with Participation in the National Health Screening Program: A Multilevel Analysis Using National Data
    Hyung-Kook Yang, Dong-Wook Shin, Seung-Sik Hwang, Juwhan Oh, Be-Long Cho
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2013; 28(3): 348.     CrossRef
  • Social Determinants of Smoking Behavior: The Healthy Twin Study, Korea
    Youn Sik Kim, Hansoo Ko, Changgyo Yoon, Dong-Hun Lee, Joohon Sung
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2012; 45(1): 29.     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated with the Use of Gastric Cancer Screening Services in Korea: The Fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008 (KNHANES IV)
    Ji-Yeon Shin, Duk-Hee Lee
    Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.2012; 13(8): 3773.     CrossRef
  • Human papillomavirus 16/18 AS04-adjuvanted cervical cancer vaccine: immunogenicity and safety in 15-25 years old healthy Korean women
    Seung Cheol Kim, Yong Sang Song, Young-Tae Kim, Young Tak Kim, Ki-Sung Ryu, Bhavyashree Gunapalaiah, Dan Bi, Hans L Bock, Jong-Sup Park
    Journal of Gynecologic Oncology.2011; 22(2): 67.     CrossRef
  • Factors associated with use of gastric cancer screening services in Korea
    Young Min Kwon, Hyung Taek Lim, Kiheon Lee, Be Long Cho, Min Sun Park, Ki Young Son, Sang Min Park
    World Journal of Gastroenterology.2009; 15(29): 3653.     CrossRef
  • Précarité sociale, cancer et vulnérabilité psychique, lien direct ou indirect ?
    A. Fernandez, G. Noël
    Psycho-Oncologie.2008; 2(4): 250.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic Disparities in Breast Cancer Screening among US Women: Trends from 2000 to 2005
    Jaeyoung Kim, Soong-Nang Jang
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2008; 41(3): 186.     CrossRef
The Proportional Mortality Ratios of Specific-cause Mortality by Occupation and Education among Men Aged 20-64 in Korea (1993-2004).
Ki Hye Kim, Kyung Hak Lee, Sang Min Lee, Seung Yeon Lee, Ye Seung Lee, Kyoung Ree Lim, Jee Eun Chang, Sang Won Cho, Eun Hye Choi, Sung Tae Chung, Eunjeong Jin, Mia Son
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(1):7-15.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.1.7
  • 4,529 View
  • 50 Download
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study investigated the relationship of occupational class and educational background with proportional mortality ratios in Korea. METHODS: Mortality was investigated using the entire registered death data from 1993 to 2004, obtained from the Korean National Statistics Office. Proportional mortality ratios (PMRs) for specific diseases were calculated according to the occupational class and educational background of men aged 20-64. RESULTS: Manual workers were found to have higher PMRs for liver disease and traffic accidents, as did the lower educated group. Especially, this study showed trends of an increasing of the wide gap between lower and higher socioeconomic stati for liver disease, traffic accidents, diabetes mellitus and cerebral vascular disease. The mortality for cerebrovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, heart disease, traffic accident and liver disease showed increasing trends according to the calendar year for the lower than the higher social class. CONCLUSIONS: The specific conditions that had higher PMRs in the Korean lower social class were liver disease and traffic accidents. Especially, there was an increasing trend for a widening of the gap between manual and nonmanual groups in relation to mortality from liver disease, diabetes mellitus and traffic accidents.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Measurement of Socioeconomic Position in Research on Cardiovascular Health Disparities in Korea: A Systematic Review
    Chi-Young Lee, Yong-Hwan Lee
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2019; 52(5): 281.     CrossRef
  • The Risk Factors of Laryngeal Pathology in Korean Adults Using a Decision Tree Model
    Haewon Byeon
    Journal of Voice.2015; 29(1): 59.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Sleep Duration on the Risk of Unintentional Injury in Korean Adults
    Yeon-Yong Kim, Un-Na Kim, Jin-Seok Lee, Jong-Heon Park
    Journal of Preventive Medicine & Public Health.2014; 47(3): 150.     CrossRef
  • Social Determinants of Smoking Behavior: The Healthy Twin Study, Korea
    Youn Sik Kim, Hansoo Ko, Changgyo Yoon, Dong-Hun Lee, Joohon Sung
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2012; 45(1): 29.     CrossRef
  • Comparative Analysis of Unweighted Sample Design and Complex Sample Design Related to the Exploration of Potential Risk Factors of Dysphonia
    Hae-Won Byeon
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2012; 13(5): 2251.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Regular Workers and Non-regular Workers on the Subjective Health Status
    Shin-Young Sohn
    Korean Journal of Occupational Health Nursing.2011; 20(3): 346.     CrossRef
  • Individual and Areal Risk Factors for Road Traffic Injury Deaths: Nationwide Study in South Korea
    Kunhee Park, Seung-Sik Hwang, Jin-Seok Lee, Yoon Kim, Soonman Kwon
    Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health.2010; 22(3): 320.     CrossRef
  • Development of Composite Deprivation Index for Korea: The Correlation with Standardized Mortality Ratio
    Hosung Shin, Suehyung Lee, Jang Min Chu
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2009; 42(6): 392.     CrossRef
  • Health Inequalities in Korea: Current Conditions and Implications
    Yu-Mi Kim, Myoung-Hee Kim
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2007; 40(6): 431.     CrossRef
Original Article
The Relationship of Social Class and Health Behaviors with Morbidity in Korea.
Mia Son
Korean J Prev Med. 2002;35(1):57-64.
  • 2,660 View
  • 45 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVE
To explore the relationship of social class and health behaviors with self-reported morbidity. METHODS: The 1995 General Household Survey in Korea was used to investigate self-reported morbidity. Logistic regression was used to examine the relationship of social class and health behaviors with self-reported chronic disease and perceived general health. RESULTS: For chronic disease and general perceived health, age adjusted odds ratios were higher for manual workers, lower-educated group as well as those in the lower income group; this held true for both men and women. Health behaviours had little effect on the relationship between social class and morbidity. The relationship between health behaviors and morbidity was very weak. The lower social class expressed higher levels of negative health behaviors, although this relationship appeared to be very weak in Korea. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that an understanding of health differentials that addresses the issue of social inequalities in Korea is required.
Summary
English Abstract
The Effects of the Parents' Social Class on Infant and Child Death among 1995-2004 Birth Cohort in Korea.
Mia Son, Juhwan Oh, Yong Jun Choi, Jeong Ok Kong, Jisook Choi, Eunjeong Jin, Sung Tae Jung, Se Jin Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(6):469-476.
  • 2,394 View
  • 43 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To investigate the effect of parents' social class on infant and child mortality rates among the birth cohort, for the period of transition to and from the Koran economic crisis 1995-2004. METHODS: All births reported to between 1995 and 2004 (n=5,711,337) were analyzed using a Cox regression model, to study the role of the social determinants of parents in infant and child mortality. The results were adjusted for the parents' age, education and occupation, together with mother's obstetrical history. RESULTS: The crude death rate among those under 10 was 3.71 per 1000 births (21,217 deaths among 5,711,337 births) between 1995 and 2004. The birth cohorts from lower educated parents less than elementary school showed higher mortality rates compared with those from higher educated parents over university level (HR:3.0 (95%CI:2.8-3.7) for father and HR:3.4 (95%CI:3.3-4.5) for mother). The mother's education level showed a stronger relationship with mortality among the birth cohort than that of the fathers'. The gaps in infant mortality rates by parents' social class, and educational level became wider from 1995 to 2004. In particular, the breadth of the existing gap between higher and lower parents' social class groups has dramatically widened since the economic crisis of 1998. DISCUSSIONS: This study shows that social differences exist in infant and child mortality rates. Also, the gap for the infant mortality due to social class has become wider since the economic crisis of 1998.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health