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Original Articles
Ethnic Variation and Its Association With Malaria Awareness: A Cross-sectional Study in East Nusa Tenggara Province, Indonesia
Robertus Dole Guntur, Jonathan Kingsley, Fakir M. Amirul Islam
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(1):68-79.   Published online November 15, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.367
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  • 119 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study investigated associations between ethnicity and malaria awareness in East Nusa Tenggara Province (ENTP), Indonesia.
Methods
A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted upon 1503 adults recruited by multi-stage cluster random sampling. A malaria awareness questionnaire was used to collect data, according to which participants were classified as aware or unaware of malaria. Logistic regression was applied to quantify the strength of associations of factors with malaria awareness.
Results
The participation rate in this study was high (99.5%). The participants were distributed relatively evenly among the Manggarai, Atoni, and Sumba ethnicities (33.0, 32.3, and 30.2%, respectively). Malaria awareness was significantly different amongst these groups; it was most common in the Manggarai ethnicity (65.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 59.9 to 70.3) and least common in the Sumba ethnicity (35.0%; 95% CI, 27.6 to 42.4). The most prominent factor influencing the malaria awareness in the Sumba and Manggarai ethnicities was education level, whilst it was socioeconomic status (SES) in the Atoni ethnicity. The likelihood of malaria awareness was significantly higher in adults with an education level of diploma or above (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 21.4; 95% CI, 3.59 to 127.7 for Manggarai; aOR, 6.94; 95% CI, 1.81 to 26.6 for Sumba). Malaria awareness was significantly more common amongst high-SES adults in the Atoni group (aOR, 24.48; 95% CI, 8.79 to 68.21).
Conclusions
Low education levels and low SES were prominent contributors to lower levels of malaria awareness in rural ENTP. Interventions should focus on improving malaria awareness to these groups to support the Indonesian government’s national commitment to achieve a malaria elimination zone by 2030.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Declined Trend of Malaria over a Ten-year Period in the Rural East Nusa Tenggara Province, Indonesia: A Medical Record Analysis
    Maria Lobo, Robertus Dole Guntur, Damai Kusumaningrum, Yulianti Paula Bria
    Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences.2024; 12(1): 107.     CrossRef
  • The Variation of Malaria Prevention Measures Knowledge and their Associated Factors in Rural East Nusa Tenggara Province, Indonesia
    Robertus Dole Guntur, Maria A. Kleden, Damai Kusumaningrum, Fakir M. Amirul Islam
    Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences.2023; 11(E): 378.     CrossRef
Regional Differences in the Effects of Social Relations on Depression Among Korean Elderly and the Moderating Effect of Living Alone
Chanki Kim, Eun Jee Chang, Chang-yup Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(6):441-450.   Published online October 22, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.337
  • 3,472 View
  • 137 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Socioeconomic disadvantages interact with numerous factors which affect geriatric mental health. One of the main factors is the social relations of the elderly. The elderly have different experiences and meanings in their social lives depending on their socio-cultural environment. In this study, we compared the effects of social relations on depression among the elderly according to their living arrangement (living alone or living with others) and residential area.
Methods
We defined social relations as “meetings with neighbors” (MN). We then analyzed the impact of MN on depression using data from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging Panel with the generalized estimating equation model. We also examined the moderating effect of living alone and performed subgroup analysis by dividing the sample according to which area they lived in.
Results
MN was associated with a reduced risk of depressive symptoms among elderlies. The size of the effect was larger in rural areas than in large cities. However, elderly those who lived alone in rural areas had a smaller protective impact of MN on depression, comparing to those who lived with others. The moderating effect of living alone was significant only in rural areas.
Conclusions
The social relations among elderlies had a positive effect on their mental health: The more frequent MN were held, the less risk of depressive symptoms occurred. However, the effect may vary depending on their living arrangement and environment. Thus, policies or programs targeting to enhance geriatric mental health should consider different socio-cultural backgrounds among elderlies.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구는 사회적 관계가 노인의 우울에 미치는 영향이 독거 상태 및 거주 지역에 따라 달라지는지 확인하였다. 사회적 관계를 이웃과의 만남 빈도로 정의하고 고령화연구패널자료를 분석한 결과 사회적 관계의 효과 크기는 대도시에서 가장 작었고 독거의 조절효과는 농어촌에서만 유의하였다.

Citations

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  • Association between area deprivation index and concerns to COVID-19: A multi-level analysis of individual and area factors
    Doo Woong Lee, Jieun Jang, Jaeyong Shin
    SSM - Population Health.2024; 25: 101580.     CrossRef
  • Nutritional Risk, Depression, and Physical Function in Older People Living Alone
    Jeong-Hye Park, Se-Won Kang
    Healthcare.2024; 12(2): 164.     CrossRef
  • Urban-Rural Differences in Prevalence of Depressive Symptoms and Its Related Factors Among Older Adults: Findings from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging
    Bongjeong Kim, Jinseub Hwang, Dohyang Kim, Soo Jin Kang
    Research in Community and Public Health Nursing.2024; 35: 51.     CrossRef
  • Global rural health disparities in Alzheimer's disease and related dementias: State of the science
    Lisa Ann Kirk Wiese, Allison Gibson, Marc Aaron Guest, Amy R. Nelson, Raven Weaver, Aditi Gupta, Owen Carmichael, Jordan P. Lewis, Allison Lindauer, Samantha Loi, Rachel Peterson, Kylie Radford, Elizabeth K. Rhodus, Christina G. Wong, Megan Zuelsdorff, La
    Alzheimer's & Dementia.2023; 19(9): 4204.     CrossRef
  • Living alone and the risk of depressive symptoms: a cross-sectional and cohort analysis based on the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study
    Guangjun Zheng, Biying Zhou, Zhenger Fang, Chunxia Jing, Sui Zhu, Mingliang Liu, Xia Chen, Lei Zuo, Haiyan Chen, Guang Hao
    BMC Psychiatry.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Assessment of the relationship between living alone and the risk of depression based on longitudinal studies: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Daolin Wu, Fuwei Liu, Shan Huang
    Frontiers in Psychiatry.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effects of Serious Games on Depression in Older Adults: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials
    Yesol Kim, Soomin Hong, Mona Choi
    Journal of Medical Internet Research.2022; 24(9): e37753.     CrossRef
The Association of Perceived Neighborhood Walkability and Environmental Pollution With Frailty Among Community-dwelling Older Adults in Korean Rural Areas: A Cross-sectional Study
Mi-Ji Kim, Sung-Hyo Seo, Ae-Rim Seo, Bo-Kyoung Kim, Gyeong-Ye Lee, Yeun-Soon Choi, Jin-Hwan Kim, Jang-Rak Kim, Yune-Sik Kang, Baek-Geun Jeong, Ki-Soo Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(6):405-415.   Published online October 24, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.19.166
  • 8,828 View
  • 144 Download
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations of frailty with perceived neighborhood walkability and environmental pollution among community-dwelling older adults in rural areas.
Methods
The participants were 808 community-dwelling men and women aged 65 years and older in 2 rural towns. Comprehensive information, including demographics, socioeconomic status, grip strength, polypharmacy, perceived neighborhood environment (specifically, walkability and environmental pollution), and frailty, was collected from participants using face-to-face interviews conducted between June and August 2018. Perceived neighborhood walkability was measured using 20 items that were selected and revised from the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale, the Neighborhood Walkability Checklist from the National Heart Foundation of Australia, and the Physical Activity Neighborhood Environment Survey. The Kaigo-Yobo Checklist was used to assess participants’ frailty.
Results
The overall prevalence of frailty in this community-dwelling population was 35.5%. Sex, age, cohabitation status, educational attainment, employment status, grip strength, and polypharmacy were significantly associated with frailty. In the logistic regression analysis, frailty was associated with low perceived neighborhood walkability (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.881; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.833 to 0.932; p<0.001) and severe perceived neighborhood environmental pollution (aOR, 1.052; 95% CI, 1.017 to 1.087; p=0.003) after adjusting for sex, age, cohabitation status, educational attainment, employment status, monthly income, grip strength, and polypharmacy.
Conclusions
More studies are warranted to establish causal relationships between walkability and environmental pollution and frailty.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구는 우리나라 농촌지역 노인들이 인지하는 지역 환경과 노쇠의 연관성을 확인하기 위하여 자기보고식 설문지로 인지된 보행편의성 및 환경오염을 측정하였고, Kaigo-Yobo 평가척도로 노쇠를 평가하였다. 연구 결과, 노쇠에 영향을 미칠 것으로 예상되는 변수들을 통제한 후에도 인지된 보행편의성의 감소와 인지된 환경오염의 증가는 노쇠와 관련성이 있었다.

Citations

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  • Effect of walkability on the physical activity of hemodialysis patients: a multicenter study
    Yoichi Sato, Naoto Usui, Yoshifumi Abe, Daisuke Okamura, Yota Kuramochi, Sho Kojima, Nobuto Shinozaki, Yu Shimano, Nobuyuki Shirai, Kenta Mikami, Yoji Yamada, Masakazu Saitoh
    Renal Replacement Therapy.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Is tourist walkability and well-being different?
    Myung Ja Kim, C. Michael Hall
    Current Issues in Tourism.2023; 26(2): 171.     CrossRef
  • Association Between Pollution and Frailty in Older People: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of the UK Biobank
    Nicola Veronese, Laura Maniscalco, Domenica Matranga, Guido Lacca, Ligia J. Dominguez, Mario Barbagallo
    Journal of the American Medical Directors Association.2023; 24(4): 475.     CrossRef
  • Associations of Perceived and Objective Neighborhood Environment Attributes with Walking in Older Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Faezeh Behnamifard, Zohre Shafieiyoun, Mostafa Behzadfar
    Journal of Urban Planning and Development.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Frailty in Older Adults and Internal and Forced Migration in Urban Neighborhood Contexts in Colombia
    Herney Rengifo-Reina, Tonatiuh Barrientos-Gutiérrez, Nancy López-Olmedo, Brisa N. Sánchez, Ana V. Diez Roux
    International Journal of Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Effects of Neighborhood Physical and Social Environment on Physical Function among Japanese Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A One-Year Longitudinal Study
    Masataka Ando, Naoto Kamide, Miki Sakamoto, Yoshitaka Shiba, Haruhiko Sato, Akie Kawamura, Shuichiro Watanabe
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(13): 7999.     CrossRef
  • Association between Age-Friendliness of Communities and Frailty among Older Adults: A Multilevel Analysis
    Jixiang Xu, Yingwei Chen, Yujie Wang, Junling Gao, Limei Huang
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(12): 7528.     CrossRef
  • Differences in the Association of Neighborhood Environment With Physical Frailty Between Urban and Rural Older Adults: The Korean Frailty and Aging Cohort Study (KFACS)
    Yuri Seo, Miji Kim, Hayoung Shim, Chang Won Won
    Journal of the American Medical Directors Association.2021; 22(3): 590.     CrossRef
  • Urban services, pedestrian networks and behaviors to measure elderly accessibility
    Federica Gaglione, Caitlin Cottrill, Carmela Gargiulo
    Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment.2021; 90: 102687.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and risk factors of frailty among people in rural areas: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Rui Xu, Qiufang Li, Feifei Guo, Maoni Zhao, Luyao Zhang
    BMJ Open.2021; 11(4): e043494.     CrossRef
  • Perceived Neighborhood Environment Associated with Sarcopenia in Urban-Dwelling Older Adults: The Korean Frailty and Aging Cohort Study (KFACS)
    Yuri Seo, Miji Kim, Hyungeun Shin, Changwon Won
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(12): 6292.     CrossRef
  • Frailty Status and Transport Disadvantage: Comparison of Older Adults’ Travel Behaviours between Metropolitan, Suburban, and Rural Areas of Japan
    Takumi Abe, Akihiko Kitamura, Satoshi Seino, Yuri Yokoyama, Hidenori Amano, Yu Taniguchi, Mariko Nishi, Yu Nofuji, Tomoko Ikeuchi, Takemi Sugiyama, Shoji Shinkai
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(17): 6367.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Throat Carriage Rate and Antimicrobial Resistance of Streptococcus pyogenes In Rural Children in Argentina
Gastón Delpech, Mónica Sparo, Beatriz Baldaccini, Gisela Pourcel, Sabina Lissarrague, Leonardo García Allende
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(2):127-132.   Published online January 4, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.15.073
  • 7,294 View
  • 190 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic carriers of group A β-hemolytic streptococci (GAS) in children living in a rural community and to investigate the association between episodes of acute pharyngitis and carrier status.
Methods
Throat swabs were collected from September to November 2013 among children 5-13 years of age from a rural community (Maria Ignacia-Vela, Argentina). The phenotypic characterization of isolates was performed by conventional tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility was assayed for penicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, and clindamycin (disk diffusion). The minimum inhibitory concentration was determined for penicillin, cefotaxime, tetracycline, and erythromycin.
Results
The carriage of β-hemolytic streptococci was detected in 18.1% of participants, with Streptococcus pyogenes in 18 participants followed by S. dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis in 5. The highest proportion of GAS was found in 8 to 10-year-old children. No significant association between the number of episodes of acute pharyngitis suffered in the last year and the carrier state was detected (p>0.05). Tetracycline resistance (55.5%) and macrolide-resistant phenotypes (11.1%) were observed. Resistance to penicillin, cefotaxime, or chloramphenicol was not expressed in any streptococcal isolate.
Conclusions
The present study demonstrated significant throat carriage of GAS and the presence of group C streptococci (S. dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis) in an Argentinian rural population. These results point out the need for continuous surveillance of GAS and non-GAS carriage as well as of antimicrobial resistance in highly susceptible populations, such as school-aged rural children. An extended surveillance program including school-aged children from different cities should be considered to estimate the prevalence of GAS carriage in Argentina.
Summary

Citations

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    Prerana Parajulee, Jung-Seok Lee, Kaja Abbas, Jeffrey Cannon, Jean Louis Excler, Jerome H. Kim, Vittal Mogasale
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Recent development and fighting strategies for lincosamide antibiotic resistance
    Yingying Yang, Shiyu Xie, Fangjing He, Yindi Xu, Zhifang Wang, Awais Ihsan, Xu Wang, Graeme N. Forrest
    Clinical Microbiology Reviews.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The rise and fall of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease: a mini review
    Yunmei Liang, Dingle Yu, Qinghua Lu, Yuejie Zheng, Yonghong Yang
    Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Throat carriage rate, associated factors, and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of group A Streptococcus among healthy school children in Jigjiga City, Eastern Ethiopia
    Shamil Barsenga, Habtamu Mitiku, Tewodros Tesfa, Tadesse Shume
    BMC Pediatrics.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Streptococcal Throat Carriage among Primary School Children Living in Uyo, Southern Nigeria
    Kevin B. Edem, Enobong E. Ikpeme, Mkpouto U. Akpan
    Journal of Child Science.2021; 11(01): e28.     CrossRef
  • Microorganisms causing respiratory diseases in children in relation to age and diagnosis
    H. O. Isaieva, M. M. Mishyna, M. O. Gonchar, O. L. Logvinova, M. A. Basiuk
    Regulatory Mechanisms in Biosystems.2020; 11(4): 552.     CrossRef
  • Asymptomatic carriage of Streptococcus pyogenes among school children in Sana’a city, Yemen
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Original Articles
C-reactive Protein Concentration Is Associated With a Higher Risk of Mortality in a Rural Korean Population
Jung Hyun Lee, Hyungseon Yeom, Hyeon Chang Kim, Il Suh, Mi Kyung Kim, Min-Ho Shin, Dong Hoon Shin, Sang-Baek Koh, Song Vogue Ahn, Tae-Yong Lee, So Yeon Ryu, Jae-Sok Song, Hong-Soon Choe, Young-Hoon Lee, Bo Youl Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2016;49(5):275-287.   Published online August 23, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.16.025
  • 9,188 View
  • 201 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory biomarker, has been widely used as a preclinical marker predictive of morbidity and mortality. Although many studies have reported a positive association between CRP and mortality, uncertainty still remains about this association in various populations, especially in rural Korea.
Methods
A total of 23 233 middle-aged participants (8862 men and 14 371 women) who were free from cardiovascular disease, cancer, and acute inflammation (defined by a CRP level ≥10 mg/L) were drawn from 11 rural communities in Korea between 2005 and 2011. Blood CRP concentration was analyzed as a categorical variable (low: 0.0-0.9 mg/L; intermediate: 1.0-3.0 mg/L; high: 3.1-9.9 mg/L) as well as a continuous variable. Each participant’s vital status through December 2013 was confirmed by death statistics from the National Statistical Office. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess the independent association between CRP and mortality after adjusting for other risk factors.
Results
The total quantity of observed person-years was 57 975 for men and 95 146 for women, and the number of deaths was 649 among men and 367 among women. Compared to the low-CRP group, the adjusted hazard ratio for all-cause mortality of the intermediate group was 1.17 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98 to 1.40) for men and 1.27 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.61) for women, and the corresponding values for the high-CRP group were 1.98 (95% CI, 1.61 to 2.42) for men and 1.41 (95% CI, 1.03 to 1.95) for women. Similar trends were found for CRP evaluated as a continuous variable and for cardiovascular mortality.
Conclusions
Higher CRP concentrations were associated with higher mortality in a rural Korean population, and this association was more prominent in men than in women.
Summary

Citations

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  • Binary cutpoint and the combined effect of systolic and diastolic blood pressure on cardiovascular disease mortality: A community-based cohort study
    Ju-Yeun Lee, Ji Hoon Hong, Sangjun Lee, Seokyung An, Aesun Shin, Sue K. Park, Tariq Jamal Siddiqi
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(6): e0270510.     CrossRef
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    Sang-Ah Lee, Sung Ok Kwon, Hyerim Park, Xiao-Ou Shu, Jong-Koo Lee, Daehee Kang
    BMJ Open.2022; 12(7): e052630.     CrossRef
  • Associations of C-reactive protein and fibrinogen with mortality from all-causes, cardiovascular disease and cancer among U.S. adults
    Junxiu Liu, Yanan Zhang, Carl J. Lavie, Fred K. Tabung, Jiting Xu, Qingwei Hu, Lixia He, Yunxiang Zhang
    Preventive Medicine.2020; 139: 106044.     CrossRef
  • Sex differences in the association between self-rated health and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in Koreans: a cross-sectional study using data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Se-Won Park, Seong-Sik Park, Eun-Jung Kim, Won-Suk Sung, In-Hyuk Ha, Boyoung Jung
    Health and Quality of Life Outcomes.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Association between Snoring and Hypertension in a Rural Population.
Hee Young Shin, Jin Su Choi, Jung Ae Rhee
Korean J Prev Med. 2001;34(3):284-290.
  • 2,100 View
  • 20 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To evaluate the association of snoring and hypertension in a rural population. METHODS: A population-based sample of 1,763 adults in Chonnam, Korea was investigated with questionnaires and height, weight, and blood pressure measurements. Information on the demographic characteristics, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, hypertension and snoring was collected through a person-to-person interview using a structured questionnaire. The level of obesity was measured by the body mass index (BMI). Hypertension was considered to be present if the average of two blood pressure measurements was greater than 140mmHg systolic or 90mmHg diastolic, or if they were currently on antihypertensive treatments. RESULTS: The prevalence of snoring was 42.7% in men and 39.8% in women. With regard to age, snoring prevalence was 44.3% in the middle-aged group (45 to 64 years), greater than 33.9% in the younger (<45 years) group or 38.7% in the elderly(> or =65 years) group. The snoring prevalence increased progressively with increasing BMI, but cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption was not associated with snoring. Hypertension occurred more frequently in snorers than in non-snorers (Odds ratio: 1.25, 95% confidence interval = 1.01-1.55). However after adjusting for sex, age, obesity, smoking, and alcohol use, an effect of snoring on hypertension was no longer present (Odds ratio: 1.13, 95% confidence interval = 0.90-1.41). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that snoring might not be associated with hypertension.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health