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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

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3 "Respiratory symptoms"
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Original Articles
Respiratory symptoms of workers exposed to the fume containing manganese.
Sun Hee Yu, Doo Hie Kim, Hyun Sul Lim, Ji Yong Kim, Byung Soon Choi
Korean J Prev Med. 1997;30(4):752-763.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
To evaluate the effect of manganese on the respiratory system, we investigated the respiratory symptoms of 63 male workers exposed to fume containing manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), and silica (Si), and compared them with those of 66 male workers not exposed to the fume in a manganese alloy smelting factory. The prevalence ratios of the seven respiratory symptoms were not different between two groups. The presence of any respiratory symptom was not related with the age, duration of employment, smoking status of workers, and exposure to fume. In furnace workers, it was not related with the airborne Mn, Fe, and Si concentration in the total or respirable fume. Airborne Mn concentrations of all 4 furnaces in the respirable fume were below 1 mg/m(3). There were two suspicious cases of pneumoconiosis among furnace workers and one definite case(1/2) among casting workers who were not exposed to fume. The above results suggest that the exposure to the low airborne Mn concentration is not related with respiratory symptoms and pneumoconiosis. However, it is necessary to study the respiratory effects of Mn using the symptom questionnaire with consideration of the severity and persistence of symptoms and the time interval from exposure.
Summary
Normal Predicted Values of Pulmonary Function of the Primary School Children in Rural Area and Sensitive Index of Respiratory Symptoms.
Byung Sun Choi, Jung Duck Park, Yeon Pyo Hong, Im Won Chang
Korean J Prev Med. 1995;28(3):690-705.
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Pulmonary function tests were conducted on 815 healthy primary school children (390 males and 425 female) in rural area using Collins Survey Spirometer (warren E. collins, Inc, U. S. A.) with X-Y Recorder. Respiratory symptoms(cough, sputum, sore throat, chest pain, chest tightness, dyspnea, coryza) were surveyed by the interviews. Multiple regression analysis and regression diagnostics were done for prediction equations of FVC, FEV1, PEFR and FEF25-75% . FVC, FEV1, PEFR and FEF25-75% values in 3 groups of children classified by the number of symptom were compared each other through standard variable value. FVC, FEV1, PEFR and FEF25-75% showed highly significant correlation with age, height and weight. Prediction equations for FVC, FEV1, PEER, FEF25-75% are functions of height only in both male and female children aged between 6 and 12 years old. PEFR showed a significant difference related with the number of symptom in female. These results suggest that the PEFR is sensitive PFT parameter in this study.
Summary
English Abstract
Air Pollution and Respiratory Symptoms of School Children in a Panel Study in Seoul.
Bo Eun Lee, Eun Hee Ha, Hye sook Park, Ho Kim, Hyun Jung Lee, Yeon Kyoung Lee, Seung Joo Lee, Yun Chul Hong
J Prev Med Public Health. 2005;38(4):465-472.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The aim of this study was to assess the effect of air pollution on the daily respiratory symptoms of elementary school children in Seoul. METHODS: Using the panel study design, we collected diary data for the children's respiratory symptoms during the 1st day~15th day of April, July, October and December in 2003 among the 2nd and 3rd grade elementary school students. We merged the respiratory symptom data with the ambient air pollution data that was monitored by Ministry of Environment. Using a generalized estimate equation, we evaluated the relationship between the daily symptoms of the subjects and the exposure to air pollution after controlling for various potential confounders. RESULTS: The nitrogen dioxide (NO2) exposure of the current day significantly increased the upper respiratory symptoms (adjusted odds ratio=1.12, 95% CI=1.01-1.24) and the lower respiratory symptoms (adjusted odds ratio=1.18, 95% CI=1.06-1.31) in the elementary school children. The sulfur dioxide (SO2) and carbon monoxide (CO) exposure in the current day was associated with the lower respiratory symptoms (adjusted odds ratio=1.12, 95% CI=1.01-1.25 for SO2; adjusted odds ratio=1.16, 95% CI=1.02-1.32 for CO). CONCLUSIONS: We found that exposure to air pollution affects the daily respiratory symptoms in children. This study suggests that the effect on children's health? due to the short term changes in air pollution levels needs to be considered as an important public health problem.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health