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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

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3 "Occupational injury"
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Original Articles
Transient Effects on the Risk of Occupational Injuries as an Acute Events: a Case-crossover Study.
Seon A Jeong, Jong Tae Lee, Jong Uk Won, Jaehoon Roh
Korean J Prev Med. 2001;34(1):35-40.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To elucidate the transient effects on the risk of occupational injuries as acute events and establish an alternative proposal. METHODS: The study population comprised a total of 302 workers randomly selected from applications for occupational injury compensation reported to the Inchon local labor office from January 1, 1999 to December 31. A case-crossover design, where each case serves its own control, was applied to this study. Through a telephone interview, workers provided useful data concerning five job related stressful events such as company transfer, work load change, overtime work, exchange duty, and work-part transfer. They were asked whether there were stressful events within a week of the occurrence of injury and the degree of stress. Exposure status from one year prior was used as control information. In the end, the data provided by 158 of selected persons was used for the analysis based on the quality of the data provided by the participants. A conditional logistic regression was used to discover the transient effects on the risk of occupational injuries as acute events. RESULTS: The effect of a company transfer and work load change on occupational injury was statistically significant on the risk of occupational injuries as an acute event(RR=5.5, 95% CI=2.501-12.428; RR=3.1, 95% CI=1.963-5.017, respectively). Other stressful events were found to elevate the risk factor for the occurrence of occupational injury, but were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggested that transient stressful events elevated the risk factor for the occurrence of occupational injury.
Summary
A Study on Safety Accidents Occurred for 5 Years at a Welding Material Manufacturing Factory.
Hyun Sul Lim
Korean J Prev Med. 1995;28(3):551-562.
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To assess the status of safety accidents, authors reviewed and analysed the records of safety accidents of a welding material manufacturing factory at pohang city from January 1989 to December 1993. The results are; 1. The total incidence of safety accidents was 295 spells for five years. 2. Average age of workers with accident was 35.7 years. Average duration of employment was 6.2 years and the duration of employment increased as the year increased. 3. There was no statistical significance on season, month, weekday and time by year in the incidence of safety accidents. The most frequent part of body injured was upper and the most frequent type of injury was abrasion. 4. Mean admission rate of safety accidents was 12.6% and the ratio of treated spells as occupational injury was 7.8%. 5. The most frequent cause of injury was worker's mistake and the most frequent action for the prevention of further accidents was safety education. 6. The incidence rate of safety accidents on 1993 was 116.2 spells per l,000 persons. Above results suggest that to prevent safety accidents, safety education should be done continuously, the environmental and human factors were controlled and more exact reporting system of safety accidents was needed.
Summary
A literature review on the health status of Korean workers under the Japanese colonialism.
Chang Yeop Kim, Ok Ryun Moon
Korean J Prev Med. 1991;24(1):45-56.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
The history of occupational health in Korea has covered the era of the Republic of Korea after the Liberation from Japanese colonialism. But the number of Korean workers exceeded about 2 millions at the times of liberation in 1945, so that it is expected that many occupational health problems inflicted Korean workers under the Japanese colonialism. The authors reviewed medical literatures, administrative documents, and other available data which were published under the colonial state, and collected things which had reference to the health status of Korean workers. The results were as follows; 1. Nutritional status of Korean workers was supposed to be inferior to of general population, some students, and poor inhabitants in a remote moutain villages. 2. It was supposed that the constitution of Korean workers was near lower limit of average build of contemporary Koreans. 3. The accidents rate in mines was significantly high but decreasing year after year, and the most importance cause of accidents was the fall of roof in the mine. The medical facilities and equipments for miners were supposed to be not sufficient in the mines and workshops. 4. Some occupational disease including silicosis, noise-induced hearing impairment, and decompression disease were known. But, overall incidence or prevalence of these diseases could not be identified. 5. On the whole, the fatalities of acute infectious diseases of Korean workers were higher than those of Japanese inhabitants in Korea and Korean inhabitants. The prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis of Korean workers was increasing with every passing year. 6. The medical personnels and facilities were so deficient that most Korean workers were out of adequate medical use. We discussed only a part of the health status of Korean workers under the Japanese colonialism, so it would be necessary to have a better grasp of details of occupational health policy and health status in the era of afflicting.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health