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Original Articles
A New Disability-related Health Care Needs Assessment Tool for Persons With Brain Disorders
Yoon Kim, Sang June Eun, Wan Ho Kim, Bum-Suk Lee, Ja-Ho Leigh, Jung-Eun Kim, Jin Yong Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(5):282-290.   Published online September 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.5.282
  • 65,535 View
  • 107 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study aimed to develop a health needs assessment (HNA) tool for persons with brain disorders and to assess the unmet needs of persons with brain disorders using the developed tool.

Methods

The authors used consensus methods to develop a HNA tool. Using a randomized stratified systematic sampling method adjusted for sex, age, and districts, 57 registered persons (27 severe and 30 mild cases) with brain disorders dwelling in Seoul, South Korea were chosen and medical specialists investigated all of the subjects with the developed tools.

Results

The HNA tool for brain disorders we developed included four categories: 1) medical interventions and operations, 2) assistive devices, 3) rehabilitation therapy, and 4) regular follow-up. This study also found that 71.9% of the subjects did not receive appropriate medical care, which implies that the severity of their disability is likely to be exacerbated and permanent, and the loss irrecoverable.

Conclusions

Our results showed that the HNA tool for persons with brain disorders based on unmet needs defined by physicians can be a useful method for evaluating the appropriateness and necessity of medical services offered to the disabled, and it can serve as the norm for providing health care services for disabled persons. Further studies should be undertaken to increase validity and reliability of the tool. Fundamental research investigating the factors generating or affecting the unmet needs is necessary; its results could serve as basis for developing policies to eliminate or alleviate these factors.

Summary
Differences in Obesity Rates Between People With and Without Disabilities and the Association of Disability and Obesity: A Nationwide Population Study in South Korea
Moo-Kyung Oh, Hyeongap Jang, Yong-Ik Kim, Belong Jo, Yoon Kim, Jong-Heon Park, Jin-Seok Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(4):211-218.   Published online July 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.4.211
  • 9,225 View
  • 70 Download
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The objective of this study was to identify the differences in obesity rates among people with and without disabilities, and evaluate the relationship between obesity rates and the existence of disabilities or characteristics of disabilities.

Methods

Mass screening data from 2008 from the National Disability Registry and National Health Insurance (NHI) are used. For analysis, we classified physical disability into three subtypes: upper limb disability, lower limb disability, and spinal cord injury. For a control group, we extracted people without disabilities by each subtype. To adjust for the participation rate in the NHI mass screening, we calculated and adopted the weight stratified by sex, age, and grade of disability. Differences in obesity rates between people with and without disabilities were examined by a chi-squared test. In addition, the effect of the existence of disabilities and grade of disabilities on obesity was examined by multiple logistic regression analysis.

Results

People with disabilities were found to have a higher obesity rate than those without disabilities. The obesity rates were 35.2% and 35.0% (people with disabilities vs. without disabilities) in the upper limb disability, 44.5% and 34.8% in the lower limb disability, 43.4% and 34.6% in the spinal cord injury. The odds for existence of physical disability and grade of disability are higher than the non-disabilities.

Conclusions

These results show that people with physical disability have a higher vulnerability to obesity.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Weight history of individuals with and without physical disability in the International Weight Control Registry
    Julianne G. Clina, R. Drew Sayer, Anna M. Gorczyca, Sai Krupa Das, James E. Friedman, Tsz Kiu Chui, Susan B. Roberts, James O. Hill
    Obesity Science & Practice.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Health-related Physical Fitness, Blood Pressure, and Body Mass Index among People with Intellectual Disability, Visual Impairment, and Hearing Impairment
    Young Hoon Kim, Su Hyun Kim, Taegyu Kim, Rui Ma
    Exercise Science.2024; 33(1): 93.     CrossRef
  • Pilot evaluation of a behavioral weight loss program for adults with physical disabilities: State of Slim Everybody usability and feasibility
    Julianne G. Clina, Holly R. Wyatt, James O. Hill, Christine C. Ferguson, Hui‐Ju Young, James H. Rimmer
    Obesity Science & Practice.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Adapting an evidence-based physical activity questionnaire for people with physical disabilities: A methodological process
    Julianne G. Clina, Cassandra Herman, Christine C. Ferguson, James H. Rimmer
    Disability and Health Journal.2023; 16(3): 101447.     CrossRef
  • Investigation of the Relationship Between Psychiatry Visit and Suicide After Deliberate Self-harm: Longitudinal National Cohort Study
    Hye Hyeon Kim, Chanyoung Ko, Ji Ae Park, In Han Song, Yu Rang Park
    JMIR Public Health and Surveillance.2023; 9: e41261.     CrossRef
  • A cross‐sectional study on the use of big data for the past H1N1 influenza epidemic in obesity after COVID‐19: Focused on the body slimming cream and leptin via DTC gene test
    Jinkyung Lee, Ki Han Kwon
    Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology.2022; 21(11): 5321.     CrossRef
  • A Study on the Research Trends on Obese People with Disabilities: Focused on Domestic Journal
    Jung-Sik Park, Yun-Kyung Song
    Journal of Korean Medicine for Obesity Research.2019; 19(1): 68.     CrossRef
  • Association of employment status and income with self-rated health among waged workers with disabilities in South Korea: population-based panel study
    Jae Woo Choi, Juyeong Kim, Euna Han, Tae Hyun Kim
    BMJ Open.2019; 9(11): e032174.     CrossRef
  • The complexity of reaching and maintaining a healthy body weight – the experience from adults with a mobility disability
    Marianne Holmgren, Magnus Sandberg, Gerd Ahlström
    BMC Obesity.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The bidirectional association between body weight and mobility disability: A population-based cohort
    Jeroen S. de Munter, Per Tynelius, Gerd Ahlström, Finn Rasmussen
    Disability and Health Journal.2016; 9(4): 632.     CrossRef
  • Effects of a walking exercise program for obese individuals with intellectual disability staying in a residential care facility
    Sungmin Son, Byoungjin Jeon, Heejung Kim
    Journal of Physical Therapy Science.2016; 28(3): 788.     CrossRef
  • Impacts of mobility disability and high and increasing body mass index on health-related quality of life and participation in society: a population-based cohort study from Sweden
    Marianne Holmgren, Anna Lindgren, Jeroen de Munter, Finn Rasmussen, Gerd Ahlström
    BMC Public Health.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparison of sarcopenic status between elderly leprosy survivors and general population
    Won Kim, Hee Won Park, Byung Kwan Hwang, Soon Ook Bae, In Kwon Kim, Sun G. Chung
    Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics.2014; 58(1): 134.     CrossRef
  • Recent Developments in Obesity Research: Linkages between Obesity, Disability, and Physical Functioning
    Sandra L. Reynolds
    Current Obesity Reports.2013; 2(3): 267.     CrossRef
English Abstract
Antihypertensive Drug Medication Adherence of People with Disabilities and its Affecting Factors in Korea.
Jong Hyock Park, Youngsoo Shin, Sang Yi Lee, Jae Hyun Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(3):249-258.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.3.249
  • 4,731 View
  • 66 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The aims of this study were to estimate the antihypertensive medication adherence in people with a disability and a history of taking antihypertensive medication, and to identify the factors affecting medication adherence. METHODS: The National Health Insurance claims data were linked with the National Disability Registry. People with a disability, who received a prescription of antihypertensives, were identified from a total of 85,098 cases. Cumulative medication adherence (CMA) was used as an indicator of medication adherence. A CMA > 80% was defined as appropriate medication adherence. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors affecting medication adherence. RESULTS: The average CMA in a total of 85,098 patients was 79.5%. The appropriate adherence (CMA > or =80%) rate was 54.5% and 20.5% of patients had a CMA < 50%. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the probability of appropriate adherence decreased with decreasing number of prescription days per visit, increasing number of providers, the patients' residential area moving from urban to rural areas, and when patients have an internal organ disability, auditory impairment, mobility impairment. CONCLUSIONS: The adherence to antihypertensive medication in people with a disability is influenced by various socio-economic, clinical and regional factors. In particular, the disabled who have locomotive and communication disabilities and internal organ impairments have a higher probability of under-adherence to antihypertensive medication adherence in Korea.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Correlation between Usual Source of Care and Medication Adherence in Patients with Hypertension
    Han-Kil Kang, Nak-Jin Sung
    Korean Journal of Family Medicine.2024; 45(2): 82.     CrossRef
  • Risk Factors and the Usual Source of Care on Non-Adherence to Antihypertensive Drugs in Immigrants with Hypertension


    Hyemin Cho, Sohyun Jeong, Cinoo Kang, Hee-Jin Kang, Suhyun Jang, Sunmee Jang
    Patient Preference and Adherence.2020; Volume 14: 2123.     CrossRef
  • Control of hypertension and diabetes among adults aged over 40 years with or without physical disabilities
    Jung-A Lee, Jong Heon Park
    International Journal on Disability and Human Development.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of antihypertensive medication adherence on hospitalization for cardiovascular disease and mortality in hypertensive patients
    Sukyoun Shin, Hyunjong Song, Sang-Kwon Oh, Kyung Eob Choi, Ho Kim, Sunmee Jang
    Hypertension Research.2013; 36(11): 1000.     CrossRef
  • Equity in health care: current situation in South Korea
    Hong-Jun Cho
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2013; 56(3): 184.     CrossRef
  • Predictors of Current Smoking among Male Students in a Technical High School: A Prospective Study
    Jong-Yeon Kim, Soon-Woo Park
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2009; 42(1): 59.     CrossRef
  • Antihypertensive Drug Medication Adherence of People with Disabilities and its Affecting Factors in Korea
    Jong-Hyock Park, Youngsoo Shin, Sang Yi Lee, Jae-Hyun Park
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2007; 40(3): 249.     CrossRef
Comparative Study
Differences in Medical Care Utilization Rates of the Disabled and the Non-disabled with Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions.
Sang Jun Eun, Jee Young Hong, Jin Yong Lee, Jin Seok Lee, Yoon Kim, Yong Ik Kim, Youngsoo Shin
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(5):411-418.
  • 2,366 View
  • 62 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this study was to determine whether the disabled have worse access to primary care than the non-disabled. METHODS: We used the National Disability Registry data and the National Health Insurance data for the calendar year 2003, and we analyzed 807,380 disabled persons who had been registered until December 2001 and we also analyzed 1,614,760 non-disabled persons for nine ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs). The rates of physician visits and hospitalizations for the patients with ACSCs were compared between the disabled and the nondisabled. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between medical care utilization and disability and to assess the association between hospitalization and the number of physician visits while controlling for potential confounders. RESULTS: The numbers of physician visits per 100 patients were 0.78~0.97 times lower for the disabled than that for the non-disabled with five of nine ACSCs. The numbers of hospitalizations per 100 patients were 1.16~1.77 times higher for the disabled than that for the non-disabled with all the ACSCs. While the ORs of a physician visit for the disabled were significantly lower than that for the non-disabled with all the ACSCs (OR: 0.44~0.70), and the ORs of hospitalization for the disabled were significantly higher (OR: 1.16~1.89). The lower physician visit group (number of physician visits < or =1) was more likely to be hospitalized than the higher physician visit group (number of physician visits > or =2) (OR: 1.69~19.77). The effect of the physician visit rate on hospitalization was larger than the effect of disability on hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the disabled were more likely to be hospitalized for ACSCs due to their lower access to primary care.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health