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4 "Bioterrorism"
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Education of Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response in Healthcare-associated Colleges - Current Status and Learning Objectives Development.
Hagyung Lee, Byung Chul Chun, Sung Eun Yi, Hyang Soon Oh, Sun Ju Wang, Jang Wook Sohn, Jee Hee Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(4):225-231.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.4.225
  • 3,990 View
  • 71 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Bioterrorism (BT) preparedness and response plans are particularly important among healthcare workers who will be among the first involved in the outbreak situations. This study was conducted to evaluate the current status of education for BT preparedness and response in healthcare-related colleges/junior colleges and to develop learning objectives for use in their regular curricula. METHODS: We surveyed all medical colleges/schools, colleges/junior colleges that train nurses, emergency medical technicians or clinical pathologists, and 10% (randomly selected) of them that train general hygienists in Korea. The survey was conducted via mail from March to July of 2007. We surveyed 35 experts to determine if there was a consensus of learning objectives among healthcare workers. RESULTS: Only 31.3% of medical colleges/schools and 13.3% of nursing colleges/junior colleges had education programs that included BT preparedness and responses in their curricula. The most common reason given for the lack of BT educational programs was 'There is not much need for education regarding BT preparedness and response in Korea'. None of the colleges/junior colleges that train clinical pathologists, or general hygienists had an education program for BT response. After evaluating the expert opinions, we developed individual learning objectives designed specifically for educational institutions. CONCLUSIONS: There were only a few colleges/junior colleges that enforce the requirement to provide education for BT preparedness and response in curricula. It is necessary to raise the perception of BT preparedness and response to induce the schools to provide such programs.
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Citations

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  • Predictors of bioterrorism preparedness among clinical nurses: A cross-sectional study
    Suhyun Lee, Yujeong Kim
    Nurse Education Today.2023; 122: 105727.     CrossRef
  • An Assessment of Knowledge and Attitude of Iranian Nurses Towards Bioterrorism
    Hasan Abolghasem Gorji, Noureddin Niknam, Nahid Aghaei, Tahereh Yaghoubi
    Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
Syndromic Surveillances based on the Emergency Department.
Joon Pil Cho, Young Gi Min, Sang Cheon Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(4):219-224.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.4.219
  • 4,618 View
  • 48 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Due to heightened concerns regarding possible bioterrorist attacks, the Korea Center for Disease Control and Prevention introduced syndromic surveillance systems, which have been run by emergency departments in hospitals throughout Korea since 2002. These systems are designed to identify illness clusters before diagnoses are confirmed and reported to public health agencies, to mobilize a rapid response, and thereby to reduce morbidity and mortality. The Korea Center for Disease Control and Prevention performed drop-in syndromic surveillance successfully during the World Cup Football Games in 2002, the Universiad games in 2004, and the Asian Pacific Economic Cooperation meeting in 2005. In addition, sustainable syndromic surveillance system involving the collaborative efforts of 125 sentinel hospitals has been in operation nationwide since 2002. Because active data collection can bias decisions a physician makes, there is a need to generate an automatic and passive data collection system. Therefore, the Korea Center for Disease Control and Prevention plans to establish computerized automatic data collection systems in the near future. These systems will be used not only for the early detection of bioterrorism but also for more effective public health responses to disease.
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Citations

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  • ISS-An Electronic Syndromic Surveillance System for Infectious Disease in Rural China
    Weirong Yan, Lars Palm, Xin Lu, Shaofa Nie, Biao Xu, Qi Zhao, Tao Tao, Liwei Cheng, Li Tan, Hengjin Dong, Vinod K. Diwan, Alessandro Vespignani
    PLoS ONE.2013; 8(4): e62749.     CrossRef
  • Analysis of the Korean Emergency Department Syndromic Surveillance System: Mass Type Acute Diarrheal Syndrome
    Shin Ahn, Jae Ho Lee, Won Kim, Kyung Soo Lim
    Healthcare Informatics Research.2010; 16(3): 177.     CrossRef
Analysis of Policies in Activating the Infectious Disease Specialist Network (IDSN) for Bioterrorism Events.
Yang Soo Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(4):214-218.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.4.214
  • 4,020 View
  • 42 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Bioterrorism events have worldwide impacts, not only in terms of security and public health policy, but also in other related sectors. Many countries, including Korea, have set up new administrative and operational structures and adapted their preparedness and response plans in order to deal with new kinds of threats. Korea has dual surveillance systems for the early detection of bioterrorism. The first is syndromic surveillance that typically monitors non-specific clinical information that may indicate possible bioterrorismassociated diseases before specific diagnoses are made. The other is infectious disease specialist network that diagnoses and responds to specific illnesses caused by intentional release of biologic agents. Infectious disease physicians, clinical microbiologists, and infection control professionals play critical and complementary roles in these networks. Infectious disease specialists should develop practical and realistic response plans for their institutions in partnership with local and state health departments, in preparation for a real or suspected bioterrorism attack.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Current Status of Bioterrorism Education in Health-related Colleges -In the Professors of the Health-related Colleges-
    Byung-Chul Chun, Kyeong-Uoon Kim, Jee-Hee Kim, Jin-Woo Kim, Sang-Gyun Roh
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2012; 13(2): 710.     CrossRef
  • Preparedness of Young Male Physicians for Biological Terrorism and Warfare in South Korea
    JH Ahn, JW Chung, CW Kim, DH Lee
    Hong Kong Journal of Emergency Medicine.2012; 19(1): 18.     CrossRef
The Strategic Plan for Preparedness and Response to Bioterrorism in Korea.
Hyun Soon Hwang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(4):209-213.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.4.209
  • 5,453 View
  • 86 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Following the Anthrax bioterrorism attacks in the US in 2001, the Korean government established comprehensive countermeasures against bioterrorism. These measures included the government assuming management of all infectious agents that cause diseases, including smallpox, anthrax, plaque, botulism, and the causative agents of viral hemorrhagic fevers (ebola fever, marburg fever, and lassa fever) for national security. In addition, the Korean government is reinforcing the ability to prepare and respond to bioterrorism. Some of the measures being implemented include revising the laws and guidelines that apply to the use of infectious agents, the construction and operation of dual surveillance systems for bioterrorism, stockpiling and managing products necessary to respond to an emergency (smallpox vaccine, antibiotics, etc.) and vigorously training emergency room staff and heath workers to ensure they can respond appropriately. In addition, the government's measures include improved public relations, building and maintaining international cooperation, and developing new vaccines and drugs for treatments of infectious agents used to create bioweapons.
Summary

Citations

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    Johanna Thelaus, Anna Lindberg, Susanne Thisted Lambertz, Mona Byström, Mats Forsman, Hans Lindmark, Rickard Knutsson, Viveca Båverud, Andreas Bråve, Pontus Jureen, Annelie Lundin Zumpe, Öjar Melefors
    Health Security.2017; 15(4): 384.     CrossRef
  • Pre-PCR Processing in Bioterrorism Preparedness: Improved Diagnostic Capabilities for Laboratory Response Networks
    Johannes Hedman, Rickard Knutsson, Ricky Ansell, Peter Rådström, Birgitta Rasmusson
    Biosecurity and Bioterrorism: Biodefense Strategy, Practice, and Science.2013; 11(S1): S87.     CrossRef
  • Harmonization of European Laboratory Response Networks by Implementing CWA 15793: Use of a Gap Analysis and an “Insider” Exercise as Tools
    Bo Sundqvist, Ulrika Allard Bengtsson, Henk J. Wisselink, Ben P. H. Peeters, Bart van Rotterdam, Evelien Kampert, Sándor Bereczky, N. G. Johan Olsson, Åsa Szekely Björndal, Sylvie Zini, Sébastien Allix, Rickard Knutsson
    Biosecurity and Bioterrorism: Biodefense Strategy, Practice, and Science.2013; 11(S1): S36.     CrossRef
  • Shelf-Life Extension Program (SLEP) as a Significant Contributor to Strategic National Stockpile Maintenance: The Israeli Experience with Ciprofloxacin
    Moran Bodas, Landschaft Yuval, Ron Zadok, Zippora Hess, Batya Haran, Mimi Kaplan, Arik Eisenkraft
    Biosecurity and Bioterrorism: Biodefense Strategy, Practice, and Science.2012; 10(2): 182.     CrossRef
  • The Current Status of Bioterrorism Education in Health-related Colleges -In the Professors of the Health-related Colleges-
    Byung-Chul Chun, Kyeong-Uoon Kim, Jee-Hee Kim, Jin-Woo Kim, Sang-Gyun Roh
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2012; 13(2): 710.     CrossRef
  • Preparedness of Young Male Physicians for Biological Terrorism and Warfare in South Korea
    JH Ahn, JW Chung, CW Kim, DH Lee
    Hong Kong Journal of Emergency Medicine.2012; 19(1): 18.     CrossRef
  • A mouse-based assay for the pre-clinical neurovirulence assessment of vaccinia virus-based smallpox vaccines
    Cheryl X. Zhang, Christian Sauder, Tahir Malik, Steven A. Rubin
    Biologicals.2010; 38(2): 278.     CrossRef

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health