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3 "Beliefs"
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Brief Report
A Cross-sectional Study of Cancer Knowledge and Beliefs Among Faith-based Chinese in the USA Versus Taiwan
Su-I Hou, Xian Cao
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(1):60-65.   Published online January 20, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.051
  • 4,453 View
  • 115 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study examined cancer knowledge, beliefs, and practice among faith-based Chinese in the USA versus Taiwan to gain better understandings on how environment and culture might play a role for tailored cancer education programs.
Methods
A self-administered survey included a validated 10-item Cancer Screening Belief Scale (CSBS), an 8-item Cancer Screening Knowledge Test (CSKT), and a 14-item cancer Warning Signs Test (CWST) was administered. Participants were recruited from 9 Chinese churches (5 in the USA and 4 in Taiwan).
Results
A total of 372 Chinese participated, 50% lived in the USA and 50% in Taiwan. Mean age was 44.31 (standard deviation, 14.74), 60% males, and majority had college education (85%). Taiwan participants scored higher on both CSKT (6.13 vs. 5.52; p<0.001) and CWST (6.80 vs. 5.38; p<0.001). Although perceived screening benefits and barriers were similar, Taiwan participants endorsed higher on screening norms (11.67 vs. 10.82; p<0.001). Taiwan participants also indicated more doctor recommending cancer screenings (42.1% vs. 29.6%; p=0.015), USA participants were more likely to have had annual health exams (65.4% vs. 48.9%; p=0.002). Regression results showed that those resided in the USA were 2.38 times more likely to report annual health exams. Married status (odds ratio [OR], 2.85), college education (OR, 2.38), doctor’s recommendation (OR, 2.87), no family cancer history (OR, 2.47), and those with lower barriers were significant factors on annual health exams.
Conclusions
Taiwan participants scored higher on cancer knowledge and screening norms, while more USA participants reported annual health exams. Taiwan’s universal healthcare might play a role on the different healthcare seeking patterns.
Summary
Original Article
Cardiovascular Disease–related Health Beliefs and Lifestyle Issues Among Karen Refugees Resettled in the United States From the Thai-Myanmar (Burma) Border
Akiko Kamimura, Kai Sin, Mu Pye, Hsien-Wen Meng
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(6):386-392.   Published online November 2, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.098
  • 12,371 View
  • 228 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Refugees resettled in the US may be at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, little is known about CVD-related issues among Karen refugees who have migrated to the US from the Thai-Myanmar border. The purpose of this study was to examine CVD-related health beliefs and lifestyle issues among Karen refugees resettled in the US.
Methods
Karen refugees resettled in the US from the Thai-Myanmar border (n=195) participated in a survey study on health beliefs related to CVD, salt intake, physical activity (PA), and smoking in the fall of 2016.
Results
A high-salt diet, physical inactivity, and smoking were major lifestyle problems. Participants who adhered to a low-salt diet considered themselves to be susceptible to CVD. Most participants did not engage in regular PA. Regular PA was associated with less perceived susceptibility to CVD and greater perceived benefits of a healthy lifestyle for decreasing the likelihood of CVD.
Conclusions
Each refugee population may require individualized strategies to promote PA and a healthy diet. Future studies should develop health education programs that are specifically designed for Karen refugees and evaluate such programs. In addition to health education programs on healthy lifestyle choices, tobacco cessation programs seem to be necessary for Karen refugees. At the same time, it is important to foster strategies to increase the utilization of preventive care among this population by promoting free or reduced-fee resources in the community to further promote their health.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Health status and Healthcare Access of Southeast Asian refugees in the United States: An integrative review
    So Hyeon Bang, Ya‐Ching Huang, Hsuan‐Ju Kuo, Emma S. Cho, Alexandra A. García
    Public Health Nursing.2023; 40(2): 324.     CrossRef
  • Breaking the barriers: The impact of health information and cultural factors on immigrant health in the Nordic countries
    Hamed Ahmadinia
    Library & Information Science Research.2023; 45(3): 101253.     CrossRef
  • Long-Term Physical Health Outcomes of Resettled Refugee Populations in the United States: A Scoping Review
    Gayathri S. Kumar, Jenna A. Beeler, Emma E. Seagle, Emily S. Jentes
    Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health.2021; 23(4): 813.     CrossRef
  • BeWell: quality assurance health promotion pilot
    Linda A. Piwowarczyk, Fernando Ona
    International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance.2019; 32(2): 321.     CrossRef
  • Bibliometric analysis of global migration health research in peer-reviewed literature (2000–2016)
    Waleed M. Sweileh, Kolitha Wickramage, Kevin Pottie, Charles Hui, Bayard Roberts, Ansam F. Sawalha, Saed H. Zyoud
    BMC Public Health.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
Brief Report
Knowledge and Perceptions of Influenza Vaccinations Among College Students in Vietnam and the United States
Akiko Kamimura, Ha N. Trinh, Shannon Weaver, Alla Chernenko, Maziar M. Nourian, Nushean Assasnik, Hanh Nguyen
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(4):268-273.   Published online May 25, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.061
  • 10,623 View
  • 230 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Influenza is a significant worldwide public health issue. Knowledge and perceptions regarding the flu vaccination are associated with whether individuals obtain the vaccination. The purpose of this study was to examine how such perceptions were related to knowledge and self-efficacy regarding influenza and the flu vaccination in Vietnam and the US. Methods: College students (n=932) in Vietnam (n=495) and the US (n=437) completed a self-administered survey regarding knowledge and perceptions of influenza vaccinations in September and October 2016. Results: Vietnamese participants reported significantly lower levels of awareness about flu risk, higher levels of negative attitudes toward flu vaccination, lower levels of knowledge about the flu and vaccination, and lower levels of self-efficacy than US participants. Higher levels of flu and flu vaccination knowledge and self-efficacy regarding general responsible health practices were associated with lower levels of negative perceptions of flu risk and attitudes toward vaccination. At the same time, self-efficacy regarding responsible health practices was associated with higher levels of awareness of flu risk and lower levels of negative attitudes toward vaccination. Self-efficacy regarding exercise was associated with lower levels of perceptions of flu risk and higher levels of negative attitudes toward vaccination. Conclusions: Vietnam could benefit from influenza education based on this comparison with the US. In both countries, knowledge and self-efficacy were found to be important factors influencing perceptions of influenza risk and vaccination.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Effects of Vaccine Literacy, Health Beliefs, and Flu Vaccination on Perceived Physical Health Status among Under/Graduate Students
    En-Jung Shon, Lena Lee
    Vaccines.2023; 11(4): 765.     CrossRef
  • Seasonal influenza vaccination among cancer patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis of the determinants
    George N. Okoli, Otto L.T. Lam, Tiba Abdulwahid, Christine J. Neilson, Salaheddin M. Mahmud, Ahmed M. Abou-Setta
    Current Problems in Cancer.2021; 45(2): 100646.     CrossRef
  • Influenza Vaccination Among U.S. College or University Students: A Systematic Review
    En-Jung Shon, Siyoung Choe, Lena Lee, Youn Ki
    American Journal of Health Promotion.2021; 35(5): 708.     CrossRef
  • Sociodemographic and health‐related determinants of seasonal influenza vaccination in pregnancy: A systematic review and meta‐analysis of the evidence since 2000
    George N. Okoli, Viraj K. Reddy, Yahya Al‐Yousif, Christine J. Neilson, Salaheddin M. Mahmud, Ahmed M. Abou‐Setta
    Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica.2021; 100(6): 997.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Health Beliefs on Flu Vaccination and Physical Health among Under/Graduate Students in the U.S.: Racial Differences (Whites, African Americans, Hispanics, and Asians)
    En-Jung Shon, Youn Ki, Lena Lee
    Social Work in Public Health.2021; 36(3): 377.     CrossRef
  • Factors influencing nursing students' intention to accept COVID-19 vaccination: A pooled analysis of seven European countries
    Evridiki Patelarou, Petros Galanis, Enkeleint A. Mechili, Agathi Argyriadi, Alexandros Argyriadis, Evanthia Asimakopoulou, Stiliana Brokaj, Jorgjia Bucaj, Juan Manuel Carmona-Torres, Ana Isabel Cobo-Cuenca, Jakub Doležel, Stefano Finotto, Darja Jarošová,
    Nurse Education Today.2021; 104: 105010.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Seasonal Influenza and Influenza Vaccination among Patients and Their Companions in North Palestine Hospitals
    Issa Alawneh, Hamza Al-Sayeh, Mahdi Zaid, Maysa Alawneh, Hossam Al-Tatari, Carol J. Burns
    Advances in Public Health.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • Seasonal influenza vaccination in older people: A systematic review and meta-analysis of the determining factors
    George N. Okoli, Otto L. T. Lam, Florentin Racovitan, Viraj K. Reddy, Christiaan H. Righolt, Christine Neilson, Ayman Chit, Edward Thommes, Ahmed M. Abou-Setta, Salaheddin M. Mahmud, Hajo Zeeb
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(6): e0234702.     CrossRef
  • College Students’ Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs about the 2017–2018 H3N2 Influenza Virus and Vaccination
    Alexander P. Oliver, M. Allison Ford, Martha A. Bass, Marie Barnard
    Southern Medical Journal.2020; 113(10): 524.     CrossRef
  • Determinants of Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Uptake Among the Elderly in the United States: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    George N. Okoli, Ahmed M. Abou-Setta, Christine J. Neilson, Ayman Chit, Edward Thommes, Salaheddin M. Mahmud
    Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine.2019; 5: 233372141987034.     CrossRef
  • Seasonal influenza vaccination: knowledge, attitude and practice in Varna, Bulgaria
    Neli M. Ermenlieva, Gabriela S. Tsankova, Tatina T. Todorova
    Therapeutic Advances in Vaccines and Immunotherapy.2019; 7: 251513551986815.     CrossRef

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health