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Volume 51(1); January 2018
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Special Article
Scientific Evidence for the Addictiveness of Tobacco and Smoking Cessation in Tobacco Litigation
Sungwon Roh
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(1):1-5.   Published online November 29, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.16.088
  • 7,401 View
  • 283 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Smokers keep smoking despite knowing that tobacco claims many lives, including their own and others’. What makes it hard for them to quit smoking nonetheless? Tobacco companies insist that smokers choose to smoke, according to their right to self-determination. Moreover, they insist that with motivation and willpower to quit smoking, smokers can easily stop smoking. Against this backdrop, this paper aims to discuss the addictive disease called tobacco use disorder, with an assessment of the addictiveness of tobacco and the reasons why smoking cessation is challenging, based on neuroscientific research. Nicotine that enters the body via smoking is rapidly transmitted to the central nervous system and causes various effects, including an arousal response. The changes in the nicotine receptors in the brain due to continuous smoking lead to addiction symptoms such as tolerance, craving, and withdrawal. Compared with other addictive substances, including alcohol and opioids, tobacco is more likely to cause dependence in smokers, and smokers are less likely to recover from their dependence. Moreover, the thinning of the cerebral cortex and the decrease in cognitive functions that occur with aging accelerate with smoking. Such changes occur in the structure and functions of the brain in proportion to the amount and period of smoking. In particular, abnormalities in the neural circuits that control cognition and decision-making cause loss of the ability to exert self-control and autonomy. This initiates nicotine dependence and the continuation of addictive behaviors. Therefore, smoking is considered to be a behavior that is repeated due to dependence on an addictive substance, nicotine, instead of one’s choice by free will.
Summary

Citations

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  • Psychological Therapies Used for the Reduction of Habitual Cigarette Smoking Cigarette Consumption: A Systematic Review
    Sandra-Milena Carrillo-Sierra, Lorena Cárdenas-Cáceres, John Anderson Cadrazco-Urquijo, Angie Natalia Salazar-Gómez, Diego Rivera-Porras, Valmore Bermúdez
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2024; 21(6): 753.     CrossRef
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    Apei Song, Zihan Zhang, Zixi Liu
    Healthcare.2023; 11(10): 1440.     CrossRef
  • Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Nicotine-Dependent Individuals and Its Correlation with Polymorphisms of Dopamine D Receptor Gene
    Hongfeng Liu, Lixin Guan, Ying Nie, Qi Li, Jiting Xue, Yong Yang, Shengzhong Rong, Jun Liang, Yanzhong Guan, Fengguo Zhai, Yanhai Ren, Ziyi An, Zesong Dong, Zhixue Han, Yuvaraja Teekaraman
    Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
  • The concept of “food addiction” helps inform the understanding of overeating and obesity: NO
    Johannes Hebebrand, Ashley N Gearhardt
    The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.2021; 113(2): 268.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge and Perception about Health Risks Associated with Tobacco Habit — A Survey
    Casilda Sushanthi L, Archana Santhanam, Herald J. Sherlin, Gifrina Jayaraj, Kanchi Ravi Don
    European Journal of General Dentistry.2020; 9(03): 163.     CrossRef
  • Trajectory of Smoking and Incidence of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease among Korean Young Adult Men
    Yongho Jee, Jooeun Jeon, Joung Hwan Back, Mikyung Ryu, Sung-il Cho
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2019; 16(12): 2219.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Concordance in the Health Behaviors of Couples by Age: A Cross-sectional Study
Seungmin Jeong, Sung-Il Cho
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(1):6-14.   Published online November 27, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.137
  • 10,448 View
  • 253 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
To investigate concordance in the health behaviors of women and their partners according to age and to investigate whether there was a stronger correlation between the health behaviors of housewives and those of their partners than between the health behaviors of non-housewives and those of their partners.
Methods
We used data obtained from women participants in the 2015 Korea Community Health Survey who were living with their partners. The outcome variables were 4 health behaviors: smoking, drinking, eating salty food, and physical activity. The main independent variables were the partners’ corresponding health behaviors. We categorized age into 4 groups (19-29, 30-49, 50-64, and ≥ 65 years) and utilized multivariate logistic regression analysis, stratifying by age group. Another logistic regression analysis was stratified by whether the participant identified as a housewife.
Results
Data from 64 971 women older than 18 years of age were analyzed. Of the 4 health behaviors, the risk of smoking (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 4.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.93 to 5.49) was highest when the participant’s partner was also a smoker. Similar results were found for an inactive lifestyle (aOR, 2.56; 95% CI, 2.45 to 2.66), eating salty food (aOR, 2.48; 95% CI, 2.36 to 2.62); and excessive drinking (aOR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.80 to 1.98). In comparison to non-housewives, housewives had higher odds of eating salty food.
Conclusions
The health behaviors of women were positively correlated with those of their partners. The magnitude of the concordance differed by age group.
Summary

Citations

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  • Let’s Enjoy an Evening on the Couch? A Daily Life Investigation of Shared Problematic Behaviors in Three Couple Studies
    Theresa Pauly, Janina Lüscher, Corina Berli, Christiane A. Hoppmann, Rachel A. Murphy, Maureen C. Ashe, Wolfgang Linden, Kenneth M. Madden, Denis Gerstorf, Urte Scholz
    Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.2024; 50(5): 733.     CrossRef
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    Kazuhiro Harada, Kouhei Masumoto, Shuichi Okada
    International Journal of Behavioral Medicine.2024; 31(2): 215.     CrossRef
  • The refusal of COVID-19 vaccination and its associated factors: a meta-analysis
    Fredo Tamara, Jonny K. Fajar, Gatot Soegiarto, Laksmi Wulandari, Andy P. Kusuma, Erwin A. Pasaribu, Reza P. Putra, Muhammad Rizky, Tajul Anshor, Maya Novariza, Surya Wijaya, Guruh Prasetyo, Adelia Pradita, Qurrata Aini, Mario V.P.H. Mete, Rahmat Yusni, Ya
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  • The refusal of COVID-19 vaccination and its associated factors: a systematic review
    Fredo Tamara, Jonny K. Fajar, Gatot Soegiarto, Laksmi Wulandari, Andy P. Kusuma, Erwin A. Pasaribu, Reza P. Putra, Muhammad Rizky, Tajul Anshor, Maya Novariza, Surya Wijaya, Guruh Prasetyo, Adelia Pradita, Qurrata Aini, Mario V.P.H. Mete, Rahmat Yusni, Ya
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  • Human height: a model common complex trait
    Mitchell Conery, Struan F. A. Grant
    Annals of Human Biology.2023; 50(1): 258.     CrossRef
  • Evidence of correlations between human partners based on systematic reviews and meta-analyses of 22 traits and UK Biobank analysis of 133 traits
    Tanya B. Horwitz, Jared V. Balbona, Katie N. Paulich, Matthew C. Keller
    Nature Human Behaviour.2023; 7(9): 1568.     CrossRef
  • Similarities in cardiometabolic risk factors among random male-female pairs: a large observational study in Japan
    Naoki Nakaya, Kumi Nakaya, Naho Tsuchiya, Toshimasa Sone, Mana Kogure, Rieko Hatanaka, Ikumi kanno, Hirohito Metoki, Taku Obara, Mami Ishikuro, Atsushi Hozawa, Shinichi Kuriyama
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    Jessica K. Perrotte, Eric C. Shattuck, Colton L. Daniels, Xiaohe Xu, Thankam Sunil
    BMC Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Spousal similarities in cardiometabolic risk factors: A cross-sectional comparison between Dutch and Japanese data from two large biobank studies
    Naoki Nakaya, Tian Xie, Bart Scheerder, Naho Tsuchiya, Akira Narita, Tomohiro Nakamura, Hirohito Metoki, Taku Obara, Mami Ishikuro, Atsushi Hozawa, Harold Snieder, Shinichi Kuriyama
    Atherosclerosis.2021; 334: 85.     CrossRef
  • Spousal Concordance in Dietary Behaviors and Metabolic Components, and Their Association: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Dann-Pyng Shih, Chu-Ting Wen, Hsien-Wen Kuo, Wen-Miin Liang, Li-Fan Liu, Chien-Tien Su, Jong-Yi Wang
    Nutrients.2020; 12(11): 3332.     CrossRef
  • Determinants of successful lifestyle change during a 6-month preconception lifestyle intervention in women with obesity and infertility
    Matty D. A. Karsten, Anne M. van Oers, Henk Groen, Meike A. Q. Mutsaerts, Mireille N. M. van Poppel, Anouk Geelen, Cornelieke van de Beek, Rebecca C. Painter, Ben W. J. Mol, Tessa J. Roseboom, Annemieke Hoek
    European Journal of Nutrition.2019; 58(6): 2463.     CrossRef
Identifying Adverse Events Using International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision Y Codes in Korea: A Cross-sectional Study
Minsu Ock, Hwa Jung Kim, Bomin Jeon, Ye-Jee Kim, Hyun Mi Ryu, Moo-Song Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(1):15-22.   Published online January 4, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.118
  • 6,946 View
  • 196 Download
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
The use of administrative data is an affordable alternative to conducting a difficult large-scale medical-record review to estimate the scale of adverse events. We identified adverse events from 2002 to 2013 on the national level in Korea, using International Classification of Diseases, tenth revision (ICD-10) Y codes.
Methods
We used data from the National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort (NHIS-NSC). We relied on medical treatment databases to extract information on ICD-10 Y codes from each participant in the NHIS-NSC. We classified adverse events in the ICD-10 Y codes into 6 types: those related to drugs, transfusions, and fluids; those related to vaccines and immunoglobulin; those related to surgery and procedures; those related to infections; those related to devices; and others.
Results
Over 12 years, a total of 20 817 adverse events were identified using ICD-10 Y codes, and the estimated total adverse event rate was 0.20%. Between 2002 and 2013, the total number of such events increased by 131.3%, from 1366 in 2002 to 3159 in 2013. The total rate increased by 103.9%, from 0.17% in 2002 to 0.35% in 2013. Events related to drugs, transfusions, and fluids were the most common (19 446, 93.4%), followed by those related to surgery and procedures (1209, 5.8%) and those related to vaccines and immunoglobulin (72, 0.3%).
Conclusions
Based on a comparison with the results of other studies, the total adverse event rate in this study was significantly underestimated. Improving coding practices for ICD-10 Y codes is necessary to precisely monitor the scale of adverse events in Korea.
Summary

Citations

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  • Accuracy assessment of patient safety incident (PSI) codes and present-on-admission (POA) indicators: a cross-sectional analysis using the Patient Safety Incidents Inquiry (PSII) in Korea
    Jeehee Pyo, Eun Young Choi, Seung Gyeong Jang, Won Lee, Minsu Ock
    BMC Health Services Research.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Eun Young Choi, Jeehee Pyo, Young-Kwon Park, Minsu Ock, Sukyeong Kim
    Journal of Patient Safety.2023; 19(1): 8.     CrossRef
  • Use of a hospital administrative database to identify and characterize community-acquired, hospital-acquired and drug-induced acute kidney injury
    Amayelle Rey, Valérie Gras-Champel, Thibaut Balcaen, Gabriel Choukroun, Kamel Masmoudi, Sophie Liabeuf
    Journal of Nephrology.2022; 35(3): 955.     CrossRef
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    Eunkyeong Choi, Siin Kim, Hae Sun Suh
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2022; 11(21): 6248.     CrossRef
  • Feasibility of Capturing Adverse Events From Insurance Claims Data Using International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Codes Coupled to Present on Admission Indicators
    Juyoung Kim, Eun Young Choi, Won Lee, Hae Mi Oh, Jeehee Pyo, Minsu Ock, So Yoon Kim, Sang-il Lee
    Journal of Patient Safety.2022; 18(5): 404.     CrossRef
  • The Korea National Patient Safety Incidents Inquiry Survey: Characteristics of Adverse Events Identified Through Medical Records Review in Regional Public Hospitals
    Min Ji Kim, Hee Jung Seo, Hong Mo Koo, Minsu Ock, Jee-In Hwang, Sang-Il Lee
    Journal of Patient Safety.2022; 18(5): 382.     CrossRef
  • Use of ICD‐10‐CM T codes in hospital claims data to identify adverse drug events in Taiwan
    Ya‐Fang Cheng, Chi‐Yuan Cheng, Szu‐Hsuan Wang, Yu‐Ting Lin, Tzu‐Cheng Tsai
    Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics.2021; 46(2): 476.     CrossRef
  • Perceptions of Hospital Health Information Managers Regarding Present on Admission Indicators in Korea: A Qualitative Study
    Jee-Hee Pyo, Eun-Young Choi, Hae-Mi Oh, Won Lee, Ju-Young Kim, Min-Su Ock, So-Yoon Kim, Sang-Il Lee
    Quality Improvement in Health Care.2020; 26(1): 23.     CrossRef
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    Sukyeong Kim, Ho Gyun Shin, A E Jeong Jo, Ari Min, Minsu Ock, Jee-In Hwang, Youngjin Jeong, Moon Sung Park, Jong Bouk Lee, Tae I K Chang, Eunhyang Song, Heungseon Kim, Sang-Il Lee
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Associations of the Neighborhood Environment With Substance Use: A Cross-sectional Investigation Among Patients in Compulsory Drug Detention Centers in Thailand
Suneerat Yangyuen, Manop Kanato, Udomsak Mahaweerawat
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(1):23-32.   Published online January 4, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.141
  • 8,155 View
  • 201 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
To identify the associations of characteristics of the neighborhood environment with substance abuse among clients receiving treatment for drug abuse in Thailand.
Methods
A cross-sectional study was conducted of 1128 drug addicts from 28 neighborhoods who were receiving treatment at all 7 compulsory drug detention centers in Thailand. A trained interviewer conducted structured interviews with the subjects about substance use and the perceived neighborhood environment in their community. A multilevel logistic regression model was applied to estimate the effects of the neighborhood environment on substance use.
Results
The majority of participants, 53.8% only used methamphetamine pills, 31.3% used other illicit drugs as well as methamphetamine pills, and 14.9% used an illicit drug other than methamphetamine. Three neighborhood characteristics were associated with substance use. A 1-unit increase in the perceived neighborhood cohesion score was associated with a 15% reduction in methamphetamine pill use and an 11% reduction of the use of both methamphetamine pills and another illicit drug. Conversely, a 1-unit increase in perceived neighborhood crime predicted 19 and 14% increases in the use of methamphetamine pills and the use of both methamphetamine pills and another illicit drug, respectively. In addition, a 1-unit increase in the scores for stigma surrounding addiction corresponded to a 25% increase of the use of methamphetamine pills and a 12% increase in the use of both methamphetamine pills and another illicit drug.
Conclusions
Substance use among drug addicts was influenced by characteristics of the neighborhood environment. Therefore, prevention and intervention strategies should be designed based on a consideration of the impact of neighborhood context on substance use behaviors.
Summary

Citations

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    Journal of Women's Health.2024; 33(5): 584.     CrossRef
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    Paranee Ninkron, Shamsudeen Yau, Narongsak Noosorn
    Tobacco Induced Diseases.2022; 20(February): 1.     CrossRef
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Spatial Inequalities in the Incidence of Colorectal Cancer and Associated Factors in the Neighborhoods of Tehran, Iran: Bayesian Spatial Models
Kamyar Mansori, Masoud Solaymani-Dodaran, Alireza Mosavi-Jarrahi, Ali Ganbary Motlagh, Masoud Salehi, Alireza Delavari, Mohsen Asadi-Lari
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(1):33-40.   Published online January 2, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.167
  • 6,662 View
  • 238 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The aim of this study was to determine the factors associated with the spatial distribution of the incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the neighborhoods of Tehran, Iran using Bayesian spatial models.
Methods
This ecological study was implemented in Tehran on the neighborhood level. Socioeconomic variables, risk factors, and health costs were extracted from the Equity Assessment Study conducted in Tehran. The data on CRC incidence were extracted from the Iranian population-based cancer registry. The Besag-York-Mollié (BYM) model was used to identify factors associated with the spatial distribution of CRC incidence. The software programs OpenBUGS version 3.2.3, ArcGIS 10.3, and GeoDa were used for the analysis.
Results
The Moran index was statistically significant for all the variables studied (p<0.05). The BYM model showed that having a women head of household (median standardized incidence ratio [SIR], 1.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06 to 2.53), living in a rental house (median SIR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.71 to 0.96), not consuming milk daily (median SIR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.55 to 0.94) and having greater household health expenditures (median SIR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.68) were associated with a statistically significant elevation in the SIR of CRC. The median (interquartile range) and mean (standard deviation) values of the SIR of CRC, with the inclusion of all the variables studied in the model, were 0.57 (1.01) and 1.05 (1.31), respectively.
Conclusions
Inequality was found in the spatial distribution of CRC incidence in Tehran on the neighborhood level. Paying attention to this inequality and the factors associated with it may be useful for resource allocation and developing preventive strategies in atrisk areas.
Summary

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  • Colorectal cancer spatial pattern in the northeast region of São Paulo, Brazil
    Adeylson Guimarães Ribeiro, Allini Mafra da Costa, Talita Fernanda Pereira, Denise Peixoto Guimarães, José Humberto Tavares Guerreiro Fregnani
    Global Epidemiology.2023; 5: 100097.     CrossRef
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    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(19): 10486.     CrossRef
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Perceptions About Alcohol Harm and Alcohol-control Strategies Among People With High Risk of Alcohol Consumption in Alberta, Canada and Queensland, Australia
Diana C. Sanchez-Ramirez, Richard C. Franklin, Donald Voaklander
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(1):41-50.   Published online December 30, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.112
  • 7,462 View
  • 205 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
To explore alcohol perceptions and their association hazardous alcohol use in the populations of Alberta, Canada and Queensland, Australia.
Methods
Data from 2500 participants of the 2013 Alberta Survey and the 2013 Queensland Social Survey was analyzed. Regression analyses were used to explore the association between alcohol perceptions and its association with hazardous alcohol use.
Results
Greater hazardous alcohol use was found in Queenslanders than Albertans (p<0.001). Overall, people with hazardous alcohol were less likely to believe that alcohol use contributes to health problems (odds ratio [OR], 0.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27 to 0.78; p<0.01) and to a higher risk of injuries (OR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.33 to 0.90; p<0.05). Albertans with hazardous alcohol use were less likely to believe that alcohol contributes to health problems (OR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.26 to 0.92; p<0.05) and were also less likely to choose a highly effective strategy as the best way for the government to reduce alcohol problems (OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.43 to 0.91; p=0.01). Queenslanders with hazardous alcohol use were less likely to believe that alcohol was a major contributor to injury (OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.20 to 0.77; p<0.01).
Conclusions
Our results suggest that people with hazardous alcohol use tend to underestimate the negative effect of alcohol consumption on health and its contribution to injuries. In addition, Albertans with hazardous alcohol use were less in favor of strategies considered highly effective to reduce alcohol harm, probably because they perceive them as a potential threat to their own alcohol consumption. These findings represent valuable sources of information for local health authorities and policymakers when designing suitable strategies to target alcohol-related problems.
Summary

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Peer Smoking and Smoking-related Beliefs Among College Students in Bangladesh
Akiko Kamimura, Zobayer Ahmmad, Mu Pye, Bethany Gull
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(1):51-58.   Published online January 22, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.146
  • 8,212 View
  • 234 Download
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Smoking is a significant public health issue in Bangladesh. The purpose of this study was to examine peer smoking and smoking-related beliefs among college students in Bangladesh.
Methods
College students at two universities in Dhaka, Bangladesh participated in a self-administered survey in May and June 2017.
Results
First, being a current or former smoker is associated with lower levels of beliefs among respondents that they would not smoke even with smoker friends or nervousness, and lower levels of intentions that they would not smoke, while current smokers and former smokers have different smoking-related beliefs. Second, having smoker friends is associated with lower levels of intentions that they would not smoke. Third, higher levels of normative beliefs that it is important not to smoke are associated with higher levels of beliefs that they would not smoke even with smoker friends or nervousness, higher levels of intentions that they would not smoke, and higher levels of avoidance of smoking.
Conclusions
Smoking-related beliefs and perceived norms in individuals’ social networks are important components in promoting tobacco cessation in Bangladesh. But it is challenging to prevent or intervene in smoking because of the high rates of smoking in this country and the high prevalence of smokers in individuals’ social networks. Future studies should examine the most effective interventions to combat smoking in high-smoking social networks, such as using mobile apps or social media, and evaluate the effectiveness of such interventions.
Summary

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Correspondence
The Role of Risk-sharing Mechanisms in Finance Health Care and Towards Universal Health Coverage in Low-and Middle-income Countries of World Health Organization Regions
Ali Ahangar, Ali Mohammad Ahmadi, Amir Hossein Mozayani, Sajjad Faraji Dizaji
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(1):59-61.   Published online January 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.199
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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health