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Volume 41(3); May 2008
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English Abstracts
Analysis of Willingness-to-Quit Cigarette Price among Korean Male Adults.
Woojin Chung, Sunmi Lee, Kayoung Shin, Seungji Lim, Kyungsook Cho
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(3):136-146.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.3.136
  • 4,410 View
  • 38 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this study was to estimate the willingness to quit cigarette price among Korean male adults, and to examine he factors affecting the willingness to quit cigarette price. METHODS: The data was collected by a random digit dial telephone survey. 702 samples were analyzed by using ttests, ANOVA and OLS regression analysis. To estimate the willingness to quit cigarette price, smokers were asked dichotomous questions with open-ended follow-up and the starting point of the price was randomized by one of 5 bid prices elicited from a pilot study. RESULTS: The mean of the willingness to quit cigarette price was 4,287 Won per package, which was about 2,000 Won higher than the mean of the actual price the smokers now paid. About 41% of respondents were willing to quit smoking if the price of cigarette would be increased by 3,000 Won, and if the price would be increased by 20,000 Won, all respondents were willing to quit smoking. The factors associated with the willingness to quit cigarette price were the place of residence, the amount of smoking and the degree of exposure to smoking through the mass media. CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that to get people to quit smoking, increasing the cigarette price would obviously be effective and much higher prices have a greater effect. Furthermore, to enlarge the effect of increased cigarette prices, providing more cessation programs to small towns, reducing the amount of smoking and decreasing or prohibiting advertisements of cigarettes and smoking in the mass media will be efficient.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Factors Associated with Intention to Quit Smoking in Community-dwelling Male Adult Smokers
    Hye-Ran Ahn
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2015; 26(4): 364.     CrossRef
  • Smoking Cessation Intention according to the Level of Cigarette Price Increase among Adolescent Smokers
    Jun Hyun Hwang, Soon-Woo Park
    Journal of the Korean Society of School Health.2014; 27(2): 59.     CrossRef
  • Cigarette Smoking Among Korean International College Students in the United States
    Jaesin Sa, Dong-Chul Seo, Toben F. Nelson, David K. Lohrmann
    Journal of American College Health.2013; 61(8): 454.     CrossRef
  • Secular trends in adult male smoking from 1992 to 2006 in South Korea: Age-specific changes with evolving tobacco-control policies
    E.J. Park, H.K. Koh, J.W. Kwon, M.K. Suh, H. Kim, S.I. Cho
    Public Health.2009; 123(10): 657.     CrossRef
Effects of Long-term Fluoride in Drinking Water on Risks of Hip Fracture of the Elderly: An Ecologic Study Based on Database of Hospitalization Episodes.
Eun Young Park, Seung Sik Hwang, Jai Yong Kim, Soo Hun Cho
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(3):147-152.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.3.147
  • 4,837 View
  • 59 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Fluoridation of drinking water is known to decrease dental caries, particularly in children. However, the effects of fluoridated water on bone over several decades are still in controversy. To assess the risk of hip fracture related to water fluoridation, we evaluated the hip fracture-related hospitalizations of the elderly between a fluoridated city and non-fluoridated cities in Korea. METHODS: Cheongju as a fluoridated area and Chungju, Chuncheon, Suwon, Wonju as non-fluoridated areas were chosen for the study. We established a database of hip fracture hospitalization episode based on the claims data submitted to the Health Insurance Review Agency from January 1995 to December 2002. The hip fracture hospitalization episodes that satisfied the conditions were those that occurred in patients over 65 years old, the injuries had a hip fracture code (ICD-9 820, ICD-10 S72) and the patients were hospitalized for at least 7days. A total of 80,558 cases of hip fracture hospitalization episodes were analyzed. RESULTS: The admission rates for hip fracture increased with the age of the men and women in both a fluoridated city and the non-fluoridated cities (p<0.01). The relative risk of hip fracture increased significantly both for men and women as their age increased. However, any difference in the hip fracture admission rates was not consistently observed between the fluoridated city and the nonfluoridated cities. CONCLUSIONS: We cannot conclude that fluoridation of drinking water increases the risk of hip fracture in the elderly.
Summary

Citations

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  • The Association between Community Water Fluoridation and Bone Diseases: A Natural Experiment in Cheongju, Korea
    Naae Lee, Sungchan Kang, Woojoo Lee, Seung-sik Hwang
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(24): 9170.     CrossRef
  • Community water fluoridation and health outcomes in England: a cross‐sectional study
    Nicholas Young, John Newton, John Morris, Joan Morris, John Langford, Jonathan Iloya, Diane Edwards, Semina Makhani, Julia Verne
    Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology.2015; 43(6): 550.     CrossRef
  • Exposure to Fluoride in Drinking Water and Hip Fracture Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies
    Xin-Hai Yin, Guang-Lei Huang, Du-Ren Lin, Cheng-Cheng Wan, Ya-Dong Wang, Ju-Kun Song, Ping Xu, Yi-Hsiang Hsu
    PLOS ONE.2015; 10(5): e0126488.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Life-long Fluoride Intake on Bone Measures of Adolescents
    S.M. Levy, J.J. Warren, K. Phipps, E. Letuchy, B. Broffitt, J. Eichenberger-Gilmore, T.L. Burns, G. Kavand, K.F. Janz, J.C. Torner, C.A. Pauley
    Journal of Dental Research.2014; 93(4): 353.     CrossRef
Epidemiological Investigation of a Measles Outbreak in a Preschool in Incheon, Korea, 2006.
Jae Sung So, Un Yeong Go, Dong Han Lee, Koang Suk Park, Jong Koo Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(3):153-158.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.3.153
  • 5,129 View
  • 62 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study describes a plan that was designed to prevent a measles outbreak that showed a changed outbreak pattern. This study is based on the epidemiological investigation of a measles outbreak in a preschool in Incheon, Korea, 2006. METHODS: The subjects were 152 students at a preschool where a measles outbreak occurred. A questionnaire survey was conducted and serological testing for measlesspecific IgM was preformed. RESULTS: Of the fifteen confirmed, identified cases, eleven patients had been vaccinated with one dose, one patient had received two doses and three patients were unvaccinated. The three unvaccinated cases consisted of one 5-year-old child, one 3-year-old child and one 16-month-old infant. For the cases with one dose of the vaccination, there were 11 cases, which consisted of six 5-year-old children, two 4-year-old children, two 3-year-old children and one 2-year-old child. The case with two doses of the vaccination was one 4-year-old child. The attack rate of measles was 100% in the 0-dose group, 11.2% in the 1-dose group and 2.0% in the 2-dose group. The vaccine's efficacy was 88.8% in the 1-dose group and 98.0% in the 2-dose group. The vaccine effectiveness for the 2-dose group was higher than that of the 1-dose group. CONCLUSIONS: High coverage with a 2-dose vaccination should be maintained, and the vaccination should be given at the suitable time to prevent a measles outbreak with a changed outbreak pattern.
Summary

Citations

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  • Vaccines for measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella in children
    Carlo Di Pietrantonj, Alessandro Rivetti, Pasquale Marchione, Maria Grazia Debalini, Vittorio Demicheli
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Vaccines for measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella in children
    Carlo Di Pietrantonj, Alessandro Rivetti, Pasquale Marchione, Maria Grazia Debalini, Vittorio Demicheli
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Measles Elimination Activities in the Western Pacific Region: Experience from the Republic of Korea
    Young June Choe, Youngmee Jee, Myoung-don Oh, Jong-Koo Lee
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2015; 30(Suppl 2): S115.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological Investigation of a Measles Outbreak in Seoul, 2013~2014
    Heejin Ham, Jungim Jang, Changho Han
    Journal of Bacteriology and Virology.2015; 45(4): 372.     CrossRef
  • Vaccines for measles, mumps and rubella in children
    Vittorio Demicheli, Alessandro Rivetti, Maria Grazia Debalini, Carlo Di Pietrantonj
    Evidence-Based Child Health: A Cochrane Review Journal.2013; 8(6): 2076.     CrossRef
  • Reemergence of Measles in South Korea: Implications for Immunization and Surveillance Programs
    Young-Joon Park, Hye Suk Eom, Eun Seong Kim, Young June Choe, Geun-Ryang Bae, Duk-Hyoung Lee
    Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases.2013; 66(1): 6.     CrossRef
  • Assessment of Serologic Immunity to Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis After Treatment of Korean Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Patients
    Hyo Jin Kwon, Jae-Wook Lee, Nak-Gyun Chung, Bin Cho, Hack-Ki Kim, Jin Han Kang
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2012; 27(1): 78.     CrossRef
  • Current status of measles in the Republic of Korea: an overview of case-based and seroepidemiological surveillance scheme
    Young June Choe, Geun-Ryang Bae
    Korean Journal of Pediatrics.2012; 55(12): 455.     CrossRef
  • Seroprevalence of measles among children affected by national measles elimination program in Korea, 2010
    Eun Seong Kim, Young June Choe, Heeyeon Cho, You-Jin Kim, Hee Sook Yoon, Jeong-Sun Yang, Kisoon Kim, Geun-Ryang Bae, Duk-hyoung Lee
    Vaccine.2012; 30(23): 3355.     CrossRef
  • Vaccines for measles, mumps and rubella in children
    Vittorio Demicheli, Alessandro Rivetti, Maria Grazia Debalini, Carlo Di Pietrantonj
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2012;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of an Expanded Case Definition for Vaccine-Modified Measles in a School Outbreak in South Korea in 2010
    Young June Choe, Jae Kyung Hu, Kyung Min Song, Heeyeon Cho, Hee Sook Yoon, Seung Tae Kim, Han Jung Lee, Kisoon Kim, Geun-Ryang Bae, Jong-Koo Lee
    Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases.2012; 65(5): 371.     CrossRef
Review
Citrus Fruits Intake and Prostate Cancer Risk: A Quantitative Systematic Review.
Jong Myon Bae, Eun Ja Lee, Gordon Guyatt
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(3):159-164.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.3.159
  • 5,534 View
  • 59 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the association between dietary intake of citrus fruits and prostate cancer risk. METHODS: Authors searched electronic databases and the reference lists of publications of diet and prostate cancer studies until August 2007. All of the epidemiological studies that obtained individual data on dietary intake of citrus fruits and presented risk estimates of the association between intake of citrus fruits and risk of prostate cancer were identified and included. Using general variance-based methods, study-specific odds ratios (OR)/ relative risk (RR) and associated confidence interval (CI)/ standard error (SE) for highest versus lowest intake of citrus fruits level were extracted from each paper. RESULTS: Eleven articles including six case-control studies, one nested case-control study and four cohort studies, proved eligible. Overall summary OR using random effect model did not show an association in risk of prostate caner with intake of citrus fruits (summary OR=1.03, 95% CI=0.89-1.19) with large heterogeneity across studies that we were unable to explain (I(2)=67.88%). The summary ORs in case-control studies and cohort studies were 1.10 (95% CI=0.97-1.22) and 1.05 (95% CI=0.96-1.14), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Pooled results from observational studies did not show an association between intake of citrus fruits and the risk of prostate cancer, although results vary substantially across studies.
Summary

Citations

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  • A review of citrus plants as functional foods and dietary supplements for human health, with an emphasis on meta-analyses, clinical trials, and their chemical composition
    Ardalan Pasdaran, Azar Hamedi, Sara Shiehzadeh, Azadeh Hamedi
    Clinical Nutrition ESPEN.2023; 54: 311.     CrossRef
  • Association of Serum Carotenoids and Retinoids with Intraprostatic Inflammation in Men without Prostate Cancer or Clinical Indication for Biopsy in the Placebo Arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial
    Susan Chadid, Xiaoling Song, Jeannette M. Schenk, Bora Gurel, M. Scott Lucia, Ian M. Thompson, Marian L. Neuhouser, Phyllis J. Goodman, Howard L. Parnes, Scott M. Lippman, William G. Nelson, Angelo M. De Marzo, Elizabeth A. Platz
    Nutrition and Cancer.2022; 74(1): 141.     CrossRef
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    Jie Wang, Jing Gao, Hong-li Xu, Ying Qian, Li Xie, Herbert Yu, Bi-yun Qian
    Pharmacological Research.2021; 166: 105430.     CrossRef
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    Santa Cirmi, Michele Navarra, Jayne V. Woodside, Marie M. Cantwell
    Pharmacological Research.2018; 133: 187.     CrossRef
  • Citrus Fruit Intake Substantially Reduces the Risk of Esophageal Cancer
    Anqiang Wang, Chengpei Zhu, Lilan Fu, Xueshuai Wan, Xiaobo Yang, Haohai Zhang, Ruoyu Miao, Lian He, Xinting Sang, Haitao Zhao
    Medicine.2015; 94(39): e1390.     CrossRef
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    Jong-Myon Bae
    Epidemiology and Health.2015; 37: e2015005.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Citrus bergamia juice on human neuroblastoma cells in vitro and in metastatic xenograft models
    M. Navarra, M.R. Ursino, N. Ferlazzo, M. Russo, U. Schumacher, U. Valentiner
    Fitoterapia.2014; 95: 83.     CrossRef
  • Fruit and Vegetable Intake in Relation to Prostate Cancer in Iranian Men: A Case-Control Study
    Faezeh Askari, Mehdi Kardoust Parizi, Mahsa Jessri, Bahram Rashidkhani
    Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.2014; 15(13): 5223.     CrossRef
  • Citrus fruit and cancer risk in a network of case–control studies
    Roberto Foschi, Claudio Pelucchi, Luigino Dal Maso, Marta Rossi, Fabio Levi, Renato Talamini, Cristina Bosetti, Eva Negri, Diego Serraino, Attilio Giacosa, Silvia Franceschi, Carlo La Vecchia
    Cancer Causes & Control.2010; 21(2): 237.     CrossRef
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    Jong-Myon Bae
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2009; 42(1): 67.     CrossRef
English Abstracts
Health Inequality Measurement in Korea Using EuroQol-5 Dimension Valuation Weights.
Hosung Shin, Dongjin Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(3):165-172.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.3.165
  • 4,910 View
  • 65 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Despite various government initiatives, including the expansion of national health insurance coverage, health inequality has been a key health policy issue in South Korea during the past decade. This study describes and compares the extent of the total health inequality and the income-related health inequality over time among Korean adults. METHODS: This study employs the 1998, 2001 and 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANESs). The self-assessed health (SAH) ordinal responses, measured on a five-point scale, rescaled to cardinal values to measure the health inequalities with using interval regression. The boundaries of each threshold for the interval regression analysis were obtained from the empirical distribution of the EuroQol-5 Dimension (EQ-5D) valuation weights estimated from the 2005 KNHANES. The final model predicting the individuals' health status included age, gender, educational attainment, occupation, income, and the regional prosperity index. The concentration index was used to measure and analyze the health inequality. RESULTS: The KNHANES data showed an unequal distribution of the total health inequality in favor of the higher income groups, and this is getting worse over time (0.0327 in 1998, 0.0393 in 2001 and 0.0924 in 2005). The income-related health inequality in 2005 was 0.0278, indicating that 30.1% of the total health inequality can be attributed to income. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate there are health inequalities across the sociodemographic and income groups despite the recent government's efforts. Further research is warranted to investigate what potential policy actions are necessary to decrease the health inequality in Korea.
Summary

Citations

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  • Medical cost trends under national health insurance benefit extension in Republic of Korea
    Jinha An, Sukil Kim
    The International Journal of Health Planning and Management.2020; 35(6): 1351.     CrossRef
  • Head-to-head comparison between the EQ-5D-5L and the EQ-5D-3L in general population health surveys
    Marc Martí-Pastor, Angels Pont, Mónica Ávila, Olatz Garin, Gemma Vilagut, Carlos G. Forero, Yolanda Pardo, Ricard Tresserras, Antonia Medina-Bustos, Oriol Garcia-Codina, Juan Cabasés, Luis Rajmil, Jordi Alonso, Montse Ferrer
    Population Health Metrics.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Hun-Hee Lee, Jung-Seo Lee, Gyeong-Nam Lee
    Journal of the Korea Society of Computer and Information.2016; 21(8): 117.     CrossRef
  • The Association between Economic Status and Depressive Symptoms: An Individual and Community Level Approach
    Sun-Jin Jo, Hyeon Woo Yim, Myeong Hee Bang, Mi Ok Lee, Tae-Youn Jun, Jin-Sook Choi, Myung-Soo Lee, Won-Chul Lee, Yong-Moon Park
    Psychiatry Investigation.2011; 8(3): 194.     CrossRef
  • Gender, Socioeconomic Status, and Self-Rated Health in a Transitional Middle-Income Setting
    Sam-ang Seubsman, Matthew James Kelly, Vasoontara Yiengprugsawan, Adrian C. Sleigh
    Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health.2011; 23(5): 754.     CrossRef
  • Discriminative capacity of the EQ-5D, SF-6D, and SF-12 as measures of health status in population health survey
    Oriol Cunillera, Ricard Tresserras, Luis Rajmil, Gemma Vilagut, Pilar Brugulat, Mike Herdman, Anna Mompart, Antonia Medina, Yolanda Pardo, Jordi Alonso, John Brazier, Montse Ferrer
    Quality of Life Research.2010; 19(6): 853.     CrossRef
Health-related Quality of Life Assessment by the EuroQol-5D in Some Rural Adults.
Mi Ah Han, So Yeon Ryu, Jong Park, Myung Geun Kang, Jong Ku Park, Ki Soon Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(3):173-180.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.3.173
  • 5,850 View
  • 70 Download
  • 36 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purposes of this study were to examine the health-related quality of life(HRQoL) and to identify its related factors for a group of rural adults. METHODS: The study subjects were 1,901 adults who were aged 40-70 years and who were living in Naju City, Jeollanamdo. The sociodemographic characteristics, health-related behavior, health status and global self-rated health were collected for statistical analysis. The healthrelated quality of life was measured by the Euroqol EQ-5D instrument. The differences on the EQ-5D index between the groups were assessed with t-test, ANOVA and hierarchical multiple regression analysis. RESULTS: Overall, the mean value of the EQ-5D index was 0.884+/-0.140 and this score was significantly different according to the socioeconomic characteristics, the healthrelated behavior, the health status and the global self-rated health. According to the results from the hierarchical multiple regression analysis, the HRQoL was significantly reduced for females, older subjects, and other subjects with no spouse and the subjects with osteoporosis, obesity, mental distress or poorer global self-rated health. CONCLUSIONS: The HRQoL for rural adults was related to the socioeconomic characteristics, the health status and the global self-rated health. A better understanding of the factors related to the HRQoL would help to improve the rural adults' quality of life.
Summary

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    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2019; 10(6): 368.     CrossRef
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    Keung-Mi Shin, Young-Sil Bae
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2019; 30(4): 437.     CrossRef
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    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2019; 30(4): 518.     CrossRef
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    Woun-Jong Choi, Kyeong-Su Kim, Hyeon-Gyeong Lee, Hyo-Cher Kim, Hye-seon Chae, Kyung-Suk Lee, Dong-Phil Choi
    The Korean Journal of Community Living Science.2018; 29(3): 399.     CrossRef
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    Suk Jeong Lee, Heesook Son
    Japan Journal of Nursing Science.2016; 13(1): 166.     CrossRef
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    Ye Hwang Kim, Jung Hwa Lee
    Journal of Korean Academy of Oral Health.2016; 40(3): 165.     CrossRef
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    Eun-Ju Lee, Myung-Gwan Kim
    The Korean Journal of Health Service Management.2016; 10(2): 99.     CrossRef
  • Quality of life in patients with diabetes mellitus compared with non-diabetic subjects in Korea: The 5th Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Hwan Ho Shin, Mi Ah Han, Jong Park, So Yeon Ryu, Seong Woo Choi, Seon Mi Park, Hyo Ju Kim
    Journal of agricultural medicine and community health.2015; 40(1): 21.     CrossRef
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    Ye Hwang Kim, Jung Hwa Lee
    Journal of Korean Academy of Oral Health.2015; 39(3): 180.     CrossRef
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    Sun-Hee Joung, YeogSeon Hong, AeRee Sohn
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    Mee Sook Lee
    Korean Journal of Community Nutrition.2015; 20(6): 423.     CrossRef
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    Hye-Sun Shin, Hyun-Duck Kim
    Journal of Korean Academy of Oral Health.2015; 39(4): 303.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Regular and Temporary Employment on Health-related Quality of Life
    Shin-Young Sohn
    The Korean Journal of Health Service Management.2015; 9(4): 171.     CrossRef
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    Yoo Park, Youngho Kim
    International Journal of Health Geographics.2014; 13(1): 6.     CrossRef
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    Jung Jeung Lee, Hye Jin Lee, Eun Jin Park
    Journal of agricultural medicine and community health.2014; 39(1): 37.     CrossRef
  • The Relationship Between the Social Network of Community-living Elders and Their Health-related Quality of Life in Korean Province
    Jun Tae Lim, Jong-Heon Park, Jin-Seok Lee, Juhwan Oh, Yoon Kim
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2013; 46(1): 28.     CrossRef
  • Psychometric properties of the EQ-5D-5L in the general population of South Korea
    Tae Hyup Kim, Min-Woo Jo, Sang-il Lee, Seon Ha Kim, Son Mi Chung
    Quality of Life Research.2013; 22(8): 2245.     CrossRef
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    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2013; 24(1): 99.     CrossRef
  • The Relationship between Metabolic Syndrome and Quality of Life in Korean Adult Women
    Hyung-Su Park, Jong Park
    The Journal of the Korea institute of electronic communication sciences.2013; 8(4): 639.     CrossRef
  • Relationship between Low Back Pain and Health-Related Quality of Life among Some Elderly
    Kyeong-Ae Oh, Jong Park, Dae-Jung Jeon, Mi-Ah Han, Seong-Woo Choi
    Journal of agricultural medicine and community health.2012; 37(3): 156.     CrossRef
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    Korean Journal of Community Nutrition.2012; 17(6): 772.     CrossRef
  • Factors Affecting the Mental Health related Quality of Life in Adults across the Lifespan
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    The Korean Journal of Rehabilitation Nursing.2012; 15(2): 73.     CrossRef
  • Impact of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Depression on Health-Related Quality of Life in Older Adults
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    International Neurourology Journal.2012; 16(3): 132.     CrossRef
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  • The Effects of Tele-care Case Management Services for Medical Aid Beneficiaries
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    Aeyoung So, Kyung-Sook Lee, Jung Sook Choi, Eun Hee Lee
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Validation Studies
Reliability of a Questionnaire for Women's Reproductive History.
Kwang Pil Ko, Sue Kyung Park, Yeonju Kim, Jisuk Bae, Jae kwan Jun, Jin Gwack, Keun Young Yoo
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(3):181-185.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.3.181
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was performed to evaluate the reproducibility of a questionnaire concerned with reproductive history and to ascertain which characteristics of the subjects (age, the visit-revisit intervals, education and chronic disease) are associated with good reliability in the Korean Multi-Center Cancer Cohort (KMCC) study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 19,688 participants were enrolled between 1993 and 2004. Among them, we selected 386 participants who were aged 40 or more and who re-visited within 8 years after the first visit. Reliability was measured by the percent agreement according to error range for the continuous variables and the percent agreement and kappa statistics for the categorical variables. RESULTS: The pregnancy histories were reliable (kappa=0.67) and the reasons for being menopausal among the postmenopausal women were also reliable (kappa=0.92). The percent agreement of the breast-feeding history was high (96.1%), although the kappa statistic was low. For the continuous variables, when the error range of one variable was considered to be reliable, the percent agreement of the age at menarche and the age at the first full term pregnancy was good (69.4% and 83.6%), whereas that of the age at menopause was low (51.5%). The factors associated with high reliability were a younger age, the presence of chronic disease and a short visit-revisit time interval. CONCLUSIONS: The agreements for parity, the reasons for menopause, and the breastfeeding history in the reproductive history questionnaire used in the KMCC were relatively good. The questionnaire for the menarche age and the menopausal age might have lower reliability due to the difference between Korean age and American age. To obtain reliable information, more attention should be given to the items in questionnaire-based surveys, and especially for surveying old-aged women.
Summary

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Original Article
Socioeconomic Disparities in Breast Cancer Screening among US Women: Trends from 2000 to 2005.
Jaeyoung Kim, Soong Nang Jang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(3):186-194.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.3.186
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  • 86 Download
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study describes trends in the socioeconomic disparities in breast cancer screening among US women aged 40 or over, from 2000 to 2005. We assessed 1) the disparities in each socioeconomic dimension; 2) the changes in screening mammography rates over time according to income, education, and race; and 3) the sizes and trends of the disparities over time. METHODS: Using data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) from 2000 to 2005, we calculated the age-adjusted screening rate according to relative household income, education level, health insurance, and race. Odds ratios and the relative inequality index (RII) were also calculated, controlling for age. RESULTS: Women in their 40s and those with lower relative incomes were less likely to undergo screening mammography. The disparity based on relative income was greater than that based on education or race (the RII among low-income women across the survey years was 3.00 to 3.48). The overall participation rate and absolute differences among socioeconomic groups changed little or decreased slightly across the survey years. However, the degree of each socioeconomic disparity and the relative inequality among socioeconomic positions remained quite consistent. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the trend of the disparity in breast cancer screening varied by socioeconomic dimension. ontinued differences in breast cancer screening rates related to income level should be considered in future efforts to decrease the disparities in breast cancer among socioeconomic groups. More focused interventions, as well as the monitoring of trends in cancer screening participation by income and education, are needed in different social settings.
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Evaluation Studies
Stability and Intra-Individual Variation of Urinary Malondialdehyde and 2-Naphthol.
Kyoung Ho Lee, Daehee Kang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(3):195-199.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.3.195
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Malondialdehyde (MDA), a lipid peroxidation by-product, has been widely used as an indicator of oxidative stress. Urinary 2-naphthol, a urinary PAH metabolite, is used as a marker of ambient particulate exposure and is associated with lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the stability and intra-individual variation associated with urinary MDA and 2-naphthol have not been thoroughly addressed. The objective of this study was to assess the stability and intraindividual variation associated with urinary MDA and 2-naphthol. METHODS: Urine samples were collected from 10 healthy volunteers (mean age 34, range 27~42 years old). Each sample was divided into three aliquots and stored under three different conditions. The levels of urinary MDA and 2-naphthol were analyzed 1) just after sampling, 2) after storage at room temperature (21degrees C) for 16 hours, and 3) after storage in a -20degrees C freezer for 16 hours. In addition, an epidemiological study was conducted in 44 Chinese subjects over a period of 3 weeks. The urinary MDA and 2-naphthol were measured by HPLC three times. RESULTS: There was no difference in the levels of urinary MDA and 2-naphthol between the triplicate measurements (n=10, p=0.84 and p=0.83, respectively). The intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) for urinary MDA and 2-naphthol were 0.74 and 0.42, respectively. However, the levels of PM2.5 in the air were well correlated with the levels of both MDA and 2-naphthol in the epidemiological study. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that urinary MDA and 2-naphthol remain stable under variable storage conditions, even at room temperature for 16 hours, and indicate that these markers can be used in epidemiological studies involving various sample storage conditions. The intra-CC of urinary 2-naphthol and MDA were acceptable for application to epidemiological studies.
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Original Article
Psychological Distress and Occupational Injury: Findings from the National Health Interview Survey 2000-2003.
Jaeyoung Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(3):200-207.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.3.200
  • 4,829 View
  • 67 Download
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study examined whether serious psychological distress (SPD) is associated with occupational injury among US employees. METHODS: The employed population aged 18-64 years was examined (n=101,855) using data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) 2000-2003. SPD was measured using the Kessler 6-item Psychological Distress Scale (K-6), a screening scale designed to identify persons with serious mental illness. The predicted marginal prevalence of psychological distress and occupational injury with the adjusted odds ratio were estimated using multiple logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: The age-adjusted 3-month prevalence of occupational injury was 0.80+/-0.12% in workers with SPD, which was 37% greater than in workers without SPD (0.58+/-0.03%). The odds of occupational injury in workers with SPD were higher compared to workers without SPD (OR=1.34, 95% CI=0.93-1.92), after controlling for sex, age, race, education, occupation, and activity limitation by at least one medical condition. Male, service and blue collar occupation, and activity limiation by co-morbidity showed significantly higher odds of occupational injury for workers with SPD. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that SPD accounts for an increased likelihood of occupational injury among US employees. A further longitudinal study is needed to differentiate the mechanism or causal pathways linking individual injury risk at the workplace, SPD, and socioeconomic factors.
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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health