Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Author index

Page Path
HOME > Browse Articles > Author index
Search
Young Sun Ro 1 Article
Prevalence of Positive Carriage of Tuberculosis, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and Vancomycin-resistant Enterococci in Patients Transported by Ambulance: A Single Center Observational Study
Young Sun Ro, Sang Do Shin, Hyun Noh, Sung-Il Cho
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(3):174-180.   Published online May 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.3.174
  • 8,702 View
  • 82 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

An ambulance can be a potential source of contagious or droplet infection of a community. We estimated the prevalence of positive carriage of tuberculosis (TB), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) in patients transported by ambulance.

Methods

This was a retrospective observational study. We enrolled all patients who visited a tertiary teaching hospital emergency department (ED). Blood, sputum, urine, body fluid, and rectal swab samples were taken from patients when they were suspected of TB, MRSA, or VRE in the ED. The patients were categorized into three groups: pre-hospital ambulance (PA) group; inter-facility ambulance (IA) group; and non-ambulance (NA) group. Adjusted odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using a multivariable logistic regression model for the prevalence of each infection.

Results

The total number of patients was 89206. Of these, 9378 (10.5%) and 4799 (5.4%) were in the PA and IA group, respectively. The prevalence of TB, MRSA, and VRE infection were 0.3%, 1.1%, and 0.3%, respectively. In the PA group, the prevalence of TB, MRSA, and VRE were 0.3%, 1.8%, and 0.4%. In the IA group, the prevalence of TB, MRSA, and VRE were 0.7%, 4.6%, and 1.5%, respectively. The adjusted ORs (95% CI) of the PA and IA compared to the NA group were 1.02 (0.69 to 1.53) and 1.83 (1.24 to 2.71) for TB, 2.24 (1.87 to 2.69) and 5.47 (4.63 to 6.46) for MRSA, 2.59 (1.78 to 3.77) and 8.90 (6.52 to 12.14) for VRE, respectively.

Conclusions

A high prevalence of positive carriage of TB, MRSA, and VRE in patients transported by metropolitan ambulances was found.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • ドクターヘリの機内環境でMRSAを認めるか?(Can methicillin–resistant Staphylococcus aureus be found in the environment of a physician–staffed helicopter emergency medical service?)
    高橋 治郎, 世良 紳語, 井上 貴博, 宮本 聡美, 上野 太輔, 稲吉 祐樹, 椎野 泰和
    Nihon Kyukyu Igakukai Zasshi: Journal of Japanese Association for Acute Medicine.2023; 34(2): 67.     CrossRef
  • Medical transport-associated infection: Review and commentary making a case for its legitimacy
    Diego Schaps, Anjni Patel Joiner, Deverick J. Anderson
    Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.2022; 43(4): 497.     CrossRef
  • Risk of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) acquisition during ambulance transport: A retrospective propensity-score–matched cohort analysis
    Diego Schaps, Andrew W. Godfrey, Deverick J. Anderson
    Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.2022; 43(4): 442.     CrossRef
  • Hand Hygiene in Emergency Medical Services
    Jonathan Teter, Michael G. Millin, Rick Bissell
    Prehospital Emergency Care.2015; 19(2): 313.     CrossRef
  • Empfehlungen zur Prävention und Kontrolle von Methicillin-resistenten Staphylococcus aureus-Stämmen (MRSA) in medizinischen und pflegerischen Einrichtungen
    C. Ruscher
    Bundesgesundheitsblatt - Gesundheitsforschung - Gesundheitsschutz.2014; 57(6): 695.     CrossRef
  • Infection Prevention in the Emergency Department
    Stephen Y. Liang, Daniel L. Theodoro, Jeremiah D. Schuur, Jonas Marschall
    Annals of Emergency Medicine.2014; 64(3): 299.     CrossRef

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health