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Young Ok Kim 3 Articles
Prevalence Estimation of Several Chronic Diseases through Community Based Health Examination Survey.
Soon Young Lee, Geun Shik Han, Young Ok Kim, Hae Kyung Kim, Byoung Hyun Min
Korean J Prev Med. 1999;32(1):40-47.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The health examination survey was conducted in order to estimate the prevalence of major chronic diseases in a community. METHODS: A multi-stage stratified probability sample of 1,656 persons, aged from 20 to 69 years, was drawn out from Kuri City. All sampled persons were personally informed of the purpose, content and procedures of the survey and mobile examination center was run between 6 AM and 9 PM for the convenience of the participants. RESULTS: 854 persons (339 males and 515 females) completed this survey with a response rate of 53.4%. Prevalent diseases in male were hypertension(19.0%), HBs Ag carrier(9.8%), impaired glucose tolerance(8.7%), diabetes mellitus(6.3%), hypercholesterolemia(3.4%), anemia(2.7%) and degenerative arthritis(2.6%) in order of prevalence rate. Prevalent diseases in female were osteoporosis(22.5%), impaired glucose tolerance(17.3%), anemia(12.8%), hypertension(12.4%), degenerative arthritis (6.6%), HBs Ag carrier(5.8%), diabetes mellitus(5.4%) and hypercholesterolemia(3.5%) in order of prevalence rate. CONCLUSIONS: This results suggest that hypertension was most prevalent in adult male whereas diabetes mellitus including IGT, osteoporosis were most prevalent in adult female, in Kuri City.
Summary
Changes in blood pressure and determinants of blood pressure level and change in Korean adolescents.
Il Suh, Chung Mo Nam, Sun Ha Jee, Suk Il Kim, Young Ok Kim, Sung Soon Kim, Won Heum Shim, Chun Bae Kim, Kang Hee Lee, Jong Won Ha, Hyung Gon Kang, Kyung Won Oh
Korean J Prev Med. 1997;30(2):308-326.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Many studies have led to the notion that essential hypertension in adults is the result of a process that starts early in life: investigation of blood pressure(BP) in children and adolescents can therefore contribute to knowledge of the etiology of the condition. a A unique longitudinal study on BP in Korea, known as Kangwha Children's Blood Pressure(KCBP) Study was initiated in 1986 to investigate changes in BP in children. This study is a part of the KCBP study. The purposes of this study are to show changes in BP and to determine factors affecting to BP level and change in Korean adolescents during age period 12 to 16 years. A total of 710 students(335 males, 375 females) who were in the first grade at junior high school(12 years old) in 1992 in Kangwha County, Korea have been followed to measure BP and related factors(anthropometric, serologic and dietary factors) annually up to 1996. A total of 562 students(242 males, 320 females) completed all five annual examinations. The main results are as follows: 1. For males, mean systolic diastolic BP at age 12 and 16 years old were 108.7 mmHg & 118.1 mmHg(systolic), and 69.5 mmHg & 73.4 mmHg(diastolic), respectively. BP level was the highest when students were at 15 years old. For females, mean systolic and diastolic BP at age 12 and 16 years were 114.4 mmHg & 113.5 mmHg(systolic) and 75.2 mmHg & 72.1 mmHg(diastolic), respectively. BP level reached the highest point when they were 13-14 years old. 2. Anthropometric variables(height, weight and body mass index etc) increased consitantly during the study period for males. However, the rate of increase was decreased for females after age 15 years. Serum total cholesterol decreased and triglyceride increased according to age for males, but they did not show any significant trend for females. Total fat intake increased at age 16 years compared with that at age 14 years. Composition of carbohydrate, protein and fat among total energy intake was 65:15:20 at age 14 and 16 years. 3. Most of anthropometric measures, especially, height, body mass index(BMI) and triceps skinfold thickness, showed a significant correlation with BP level in both sexes. When BMI was adjusted, serum total cholesterol showed a significant negative correlation with systolic BP at age 12 years in males, but at age 14 years the direction of correlation changed to positive. In females serum total cholesterol was negatively correlated with diastolic BP at age 15 and 16 years. Triglyceride and creatine showed positive correlation with systolic and diastolic BP in males, but they did not show any correlation in females. There was no consistent findings between nutrient intake and BP level. However, protein intake correlated positively with diastolic BP level in males. 4. Blood pressure change was positively associated with changes in BMI and serum total cholesterol in both sexes. Change in creatine was associated with BP change positively in males and negatively in females. Students whose sodium intake was high showed higher systolic and diastolic BP in males, and students whose total fat intake was high maintained lower level of BP in females. The major determinants on BP change was BMI in both sexes.
Summary
A study on improvement of school lunch program in a demonstration school (II).
Myung Ho Kim, Won Duck Lee, Young Ok Kim, Moon Shik Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 1976;9(1):95-108.
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It is obvious that adequate nutrition is essential for growth and development of school children, and many elementary schools in this country have already practiced it. Therefore, it would seem apparent that the school feeding program would have a significant effect on the growth and development of school children. This paper presents a two-year experimental school-feeding program from 1973 to 1974, and attempts to evaluate its effects by before-and-after nutrition surveys conducted in two elementary schools, one experimental and the other as a control. The two schools are both located in the same county (Yongin-Kun, Kyunggi-Do), and the families of their students are presumed to share the same socio-economic level. To assess the effect of school-feeding, we measured height, weight, chest circumference and grasping power. Physical examination was done foresigns of nutritional deficiency. A stool examination for parasites and blood examinations for hemoglobin, hematocrit and serum protein were included. Analysis were done for 150 students selected randomly at the beginning of the program. These students attended the school throughout the program period. Results are as follows: 1. The amount of increase of height, weight, chest circumference and grasping power were greater in the experimental school than in the control school, but the differences are not statistically significant. 2. Signs of vitamin deficiency decreased in both experimental and control schools during the two-year program period. 3. At the time of the 1974 post-survey, values of Hb. & Hct. revealed no significant differences between the two schools, but serum protein level was a little higher than that of general Korean rural children of the same age. 4. Infestation rate of parasites had increased in both schools during the two-year program period. 5. Each student of the two schools was classified into three major classes, according to the level of economic condition of his or her parents, namely higher, middle and lower. The results of each class of the experimental school was compared with that of the corresponding class of the control school, expecting the relative magnitude of change largest in the lower economic class of the experimental school. However, change was greatest in the middle class, still not being statistically significant. Finally, the authors concluded that the two-year period for such a program is not sufficiently long for its beneficial effects to be demonstrated and measured. As long as the growth and development of children are concerned, planning with a more distant perspective is required, as well as the development of new methods of evaluation.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health