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Young Bong Kim 2 Articles
Epidemiological characteristics of HIV infected homosexuals in Korea(1992).
Young Keol Cho, Yung Oh Shin, Young Bong Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 1993;26(4):541-550.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
In order to investigate psychological and behavioral characteristics homosexuals and to present evidence that homosexuals are in danger of HIV infection in Korea, this study was done by self-administered questionnaire and then direct interview with the 28(35%) HIV infected homosexual/bisexuals of 79 HIV infected persons reported in 1992. Homosexuals without heterosexual activity were 9 and the others were bisexuals. Sixty-five percent of respondents had a guilty conscience for their homosexual activity. Twenty(71%) were in twenties and 5(18%) in thirties. Twelve(43%) were detected via health card checking by health office, 21% by blood donation, 18% by hospital visit, and 7% by partner notification. Motivations for homosexual activity were curiosity(36%), temptation or recommendation(14%) and compulsion(11%). Eighteen(72%) never used condom on anal sex. Nine of 26 respondents had experience for anal sex with foreigners. Fourteen(54%) of 26 respondents had history for sexually transmitted diseases. Fightly percent did not have sexual contact after HIV infection and the others usually used condom. It was confirmed that over 57% of the respondents were infected within 1 year before HIV diagnosis and over 82% within 2 years. These data suggest that HIV infection among homosexual group is rapidly spreading.
Summary
Study on Changes of Attitude toward Ideal Number of Children and Value System for Children.
Young Bong Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 1974;7(1):203-209.
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  • 21 Download
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This study is intended to comparison of the recent ideal number of children and artal approach for analyzing value system for children that form attitude affecting birth affecting birth control with earlier study conducted 10 years ago. In general the traditional fertility pattern of Korea may be considered as "early marriage and high fertility" backed by the confucian value system of a farming-oriented country. A selective attitude favoring sons contributes substantially to fertility. But Korea is now moving toward late marriage and fertility pattern. This has been due to the rapid introduction of western culture and a partial acceptance of western value systems, a relative weakening of traditional value systems, a gradual increase in infant and child survival rates through medicines, and a desire to avoid having too many children because of economic poverty. This study showed following results: Ideal number of sons and daughters in urban area was decreased by 0.2 respectively compared to earlier study. In rural area, the number of decrease of sons and daughters was 0.5 and 0.2 respectively. The conception concerning Happiness has changed to wealth from health in previous opinion. Regarding attitude toward having sons, 98 percent of them wanted to have sons positively, moreover 10 percent of them wanted two or more sons. Regarding reasons for the wanting sons, we see that line, are a principle concern of about 56 percent in both areas. The rate of dependence in old age was decreased conspicuously compare to previous study while the rate of holding rituals was increased remarkably in rural area. Among reasons for limiting family size, "for better living and for better education for their children were main reasons rated 46 percent in urban, 51 percent in rural area. The rates were not changed compare to previous study. Regarding attitude of those who have no son of children, the rate of re-marriage with second wife was decreased remarkably in rural area and the rate of living without special behavior for having son was increased compare to previous study.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health