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Yong Jun Choi 7 Articles
Factors Associated with Gastric Cancer Screening of Koreans Based on a Socio-ecological Model.
Sang Soo Bae, Heui Sug Jo, Dong Hyun Kim, Yong Jun Choi, Hun Jae Lee, Tae Jin Lee, Hye Jean Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(2):100-106.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.2.100
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  • 18 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
We measured behavioral factors associated with Koreans receiving gastric cancer screening based on a socio-ecological model, in part to develop strategies to improve cancer screening rates. METHODS: A telephone survey was conducted with 2,576 people chosen through stratified random sampling from April 1- May 31, 2004. Collected information included gastric cancer screening, socio-demographic factors, and socio-ecological factors at intrapersonal, interpersonal, community, and public policy levels. RESULTS: Among 985 survey respondents (380 men and 605 women), 402 had received gastric cancer screening. Logistic analysis was performed to compare those screened and unscreened. 'Age' was the only demographic factor that showed a statistically significant association with getting screening. People in their fifties (OR=1.731, 95% CI=1.190-2.520) and sixties (OR=2.098, 95% CI=1.301-3.385) showed a higher likelihood of getting screened, compared to those in the forties. 'Accessibility to a medical institution' was a significant factor related to having gastric cancer screening at the intrapersonal level. At the interpersonal level, recommendations by family members to be screened and a family practice of routine cancer screening were significantly related. People with frequent education about cancer screening or with stronger social feelings that cancer screening is necessary also demonstrated significantly higher tendencies to be screened. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, a socio-ecological model seems appropriate for explaining gastric cancer screening behavior and associated factors. Health planners should develop integrated strategies to improve cancer screening rates based on socio-ecological factors, especially at the interpersonal and community levels.
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  • Current Status and Associated Factors of Emotional Distress Due to COVID-19 Among People with Physical Disabilities Living in the Community: Secondary Data Analysis using the 2020 National Survey of Disabled Persons
    Bohye Kim, Ju Young Yoon
    Research in Community and Public Health Nursing.2024; 35: 37.     CrossRef
  • Intentions to undergo primary screening with colonoscopy under the National Cancer Screening Program in Korea
    Kyeongmin Lee, Haejoo Seo, Sunho Choe, Seung-Yong Jeong, Ji Won Park, Mina Suh, Aesun Shin, Kui Son Choi, Filipe Prazeres
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(2): e0247252.     CrossRef
  • Perspectives on Underlying Factors for Unhealthy Diet and Sedentary Lifestyle of Adolescents at a Kenyan Coastal Setting
    Derrick Ssewanyana, Amina Abubakar, Anneloes van Baar, Patrick N. Mwangala, Charles R. Newton
    Frontiers in Public Health.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Acculturation and Arab immigrant health in Colorado: a socio-ecological perspective
    Dana El Hajj, Paul F. Cook
    Nutrition & Food Science.2018; 48(5): 795.     CrossRef
  • Cervical Cancer: Barriers to Screening in the Somali Community in Minnesota
    Rahel G. Ghebre, Barrett Sewali, Sirad Osman, Amira Adawe, Hai T. Nguyen, Kolawole S. Okuyemi, Anne Joseph
    Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health.2015; 17(3): 722.     CrossRef
  • The Factors Related to the Non-Practice of Cancer Screening in Cancer Survivors: Based on the 2007-2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Song-Ei Yang, Nam-Kyung Han, Sun-Mi Lee, Tae-Hyun Kim, Woojin Chung
    Health Policy and Management.2015; 25(3): 162.     CrossRef
  • Study on the Factors Related With Intention of Cancer Screening Among Korean Residents
    Bong Ki Kim, Heui Sug Jo, Hey Jean Lee
    Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health.2015; 27(2): NP2133.     CrossRef
  • Colorectal Cancer Screening in Korean Workers
    Su Ho Park, Gwang Suk Kim
    Cancer Nursing.2014; 37(4): 278.     CrossRef
  • Socioecological Perspectives on Cervical Cancer and Cervical Cancer Screening Among Asian American Women
    Jongwon Lee, Mauricio Carvallo
    Journal of Community Health.2014; 39(5): 863.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of Interventions to Increase Screening for Gastric and Colorectal Cancer in Korea
    Nam Soo Hong, Sin Kam
    Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.2014; 15(21): 9147.     CrossRef
  • The Relationship between Socioeconomic Status and Gastric Cancer Screening in the Population of a Metropolitan Area
    Hyun-Suk Oh, Sun A Kim, Sun-Seog Kweon, Jung-Ae Rhee, So-Yeon Ryu, Min-Ho Shin
    Journal of agricultural medicine and community health.2013; 38(3): 174.     CrossRef
  • Factors Affecting Diabetic Screening Behavior of Korean Adults: A Multilevel Analysis
    Hyeongsu Kim, Minjung Lee, Haejoon Kim, Kunsei Lee, Sounghoon Chang, Vitna Kim, Jun Pyo Myong, Soyoun Jeon
    Asian Nursing Research.2013; 7(2): 67.     CrossRef
  • Multilevel Analysis of Health Care Service Utilization among Medical Aid Beneficiaries in Korea
    Yang Heui Ahn, Ok Kyung Ham, Soo Hyun Kim, Chang Gi Park
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing.2012; 42(7): 928.     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated with the Use of Gastric Cancer Screening Services in Korea: The Fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008 (KNHANES IV)
    Ji-Yeon Shin, Duk-Hee Lee
    Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.2012; 13(8): 3773.     CrossRef
  • Relationships between Knowledge about Early Detection, Cancer Risk Perception and Cancer Screening Tests in the General Public Aged 40 and Over
    Young Hee Yang
    Asian Oncology Nursing.2012; 12(1): 52.     CrossRef
  • Behavioral risk factors and use of preventive screening services among spousal caregivers of cancer patients
    Ki Young Son, Sang Min Park, Chi Hoon Lee, Geum Jeong Choi, DaeGeun Lee, SeoungHee Jo, Se Hoon Lee, BeLong Cho
    Supportive Care in Cancer.2011; 19(7): 919.     CrossRef
  • The Effects of Daughter's Breast Health Education on Mother's Breast Cancer Screening Attitude
    Hee Sun Kang, Myung-Sun Hyun, Mijong Kim
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2010; 21(3): 273.     CrossRef
  • Factors associated with use of gastric cancer screening services in Korea
    Young Min Kwon, Hyung Taek Lim, Kiheon Lee, Be Long Cho, Min Sun Park, Ki Young Son, Sang Min Park
    World Journal of Gastroenterology.2009; 15(29): 3653.     CrossRef
A Review on Socioeconomic Position Indicators in Health Inequality Research.
Yong Jun Choi, Baek Geun Jeong, Sung Il Cho, Kyunghee Jung-Choi, Soong Nang Jang, Minah Kang, Young Ho Khang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(6):475-486.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.6.475
  • 5,563 View
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  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Socioeconomic position (SEP) refers to the socioeconomic factors that influence which position an individual or group of people will hold within the structure of a society. In this study, we provide a comprehensive review of various indicators of SEP, including education level, occupation-based SEP, income and wealth, area SEP, lifecourse SEP, and SEP indicators for women, elderly and youth. METHODS AND RESULTS: This report provides a brief theoretical background and discusses the measurement, interpretation issues, advantages and limitations associated with the use of each SEP indicator. We also describe some problems that arise when selecting SEP indicators and highlight the indicators that appear to be appropriate for health inequality research. Some practical information for use in health inequality research in South Korea is also presented. CONCLUSIONS: Investigation into the associations between various SEP indicators and health outcomes can provide a more complete understanding of mechanisms between SEP and health. The relationship between specific SEP indicators and specific health outcomes can vary by country due to the differences in the historical, socioeconomic, and cultural contexts of the SEP indicators.
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  • How does subjective social status at school at the age of 15 affect the risk of depressive symptoms at the ages of 18, 21, and 28? A longitudinal study
    Marie Kjærgaard Lange, Vivi Just-Nørregaard, Trine Nøhr Winding, Chung-Ying Lin
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(12): e0296349.     CrossRef
  • Educational level and colorectal cancer risk: the mediating roles of lifestyle and dietary factors
    Lei Li, Yu-Jing Fang, Alinuer Abulimiti, Chu-Yi Huang, Kai-Yan Liu, Yu-Ming Chen, Cai-Xia Zhang
    European Journal of Cancer Prevention.2022; 31(2): 137.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic disparities in self-rated health in two East Asian countries: Comparative study between Japan and Korea
    Shiho Kino, Soong-nang Jang, Shuko Takahashi, Daniel K. Ebner, Ichiro Kawachi
    Social Science & Medicine.2020; 253: 112945.     CrossRef
  • Income Difference in Attitudes towards Cancer in General Population: Findings from a National Survey
    Hye Sook Min, Jinsil Park, Young Ae Kim, Hyung Kook Yang, Keeho Park
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Place of death and associated gender difference in Korea 2006–2014: Evidence from exit interviews of the Korean Longitudinal Study of Ageing
    Ja-kyung Lee, Soong-nang Jang
    Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics.2018; 78: 196.     CrossRef
  • The mediation effect of individual eating behaviours on the relationship between socioeconomic status and dietary quality in children: the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Hye Ah Lee, Hyesook Park
    European Journal of Nutrition.2017; 56(3): 1339.     CrossRef
  • Domestic Civil Support Missions Can Aggravate Negative Mental Health Outcomes Among National Guardsmen: The Moderating Role of Economic Difficulties
    Dale W. Russell, Josh B. Kazman, David M. Benedek, Robert J. Ursano, Cristel A. Russell
    Journal of Traumatic Stress.2017; 30(2): 195.     CrossRef
  • Household and area income levels are associated with smoking status in the Korean adult population
    Woo-Jun Yun, Jung-Ae Rhee, Sun A Kim, Sun-Seog Kweon, Young-Hoon Lee, So-Yeon Ryu, Soon-Woo Park, Dong Hyun Kim, Min-Ho Shin
    BMC Public Health.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic disparities of periodontitis in Koreans based on the KNHANES IV
    D‐W Kim, J‐C Park, TH‐T Rim, U‐W Jung, C‐S Kim, N Donos, I‐H Cha, S‐H Choi
    Oral Diseases.2014; 20(6): 551.     CrossRef
  • Children's Mental Health in the Area Affected by the Hebei Spirit Oil Spill Accident
    Mina Ha, Woo-Chul Jeong, Myungho Lim, Hojang Kwon, Yeyong Choi, Seung-Jin Yoo, Su Ryun Noh, Hae-Kwan Cheong
    Environmental Health and Toxicology.2013; 28: e2013010.     CrossRef
  • The Relationship between Smoking, Alcohol Drinking, and Parenting Behavior Perceived by Adolescents
    Yun Ho Roh, Eun Joo Kim
    Korean Journal of Health Education and Promotion.2013; 30(2): 71.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic Indicators Associated with Initiation and Cessation of Smoking among Women in Seoul
    Yu-Na Kim, Young-Gyu Cho, Cheol-Hwan Kim, Jae-Heon Kang, Hyun-Ah Park, Kyoung-Woo Kim, Yang-Im Hur, Su-Hyun Lee, Yun-Min Na, No-Yai Park
    Korean Journal of Family Medicine.2012; 33(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Association between Household Income and Asthma Symptoms among Elementary School Children in Seoul
    Won-Jun Choi, In-Yong Um, Soyoung Hong, Hye Yung Yum, Hyunjung Kim, Hojang Kwon
    Environmental Health and Toxicology.2012; 27: e2012020.     CrossRef
  • Socio-economic disparities in behavioural risk factors for cancer and use of cancer screening services in Korean adults aged 30 years and older: The Third Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005 (KNHANES III)
    K. Lee, H.T. Lim, S.-S. Hwang, D.W. Chae, S.M. Park
    Public Health.2010; 124(12): 698.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic Inequity in Self-Rated Health Status and Contribution of Health Behavioral Factors in Korea
    Minkyung Kim, Woojin Chung, Seungji Lim, Soojin Yoon, Jakyoung Lee, Eunkyung Kim, Lanju Ko
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2010; 43(1): 50.     CrossRef
  • Associations of Income and Wealth with Health Status in the Korean Elderly
    Bo-Hyun Park, Minsoo Jung, Tae-Jin Lee
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2009; 42(5): 275.     CrossRef
Awareness, Treatment, and Control Rates of Hypertension and Related Factors of Awareness among Middle Aged Adult and Elderly in Chuncheon: Hallym Aging Study(HAS).
Jin Young Jeong, Yong Jun Choi, Soong Nang Jang, Kyung soon Hong, Young ho Choi, Moon ki Choi, Dong Hyun Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(4):305-312.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.4.305
  • 4,912 View
  • 39 Download
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To estimate the awareness, treatment and control rate, as well as to identify the awareness-related factors for hypertension. METHODS: The study participants were 482 adults (men 206, women 276), aged 45 or over, diagnosed with hypertension and living in Chuncheon. The awareness rate was defined as the proportion of persons among those with hypertension who had previously been diagnosed by a physician. The treatment rate was defined as the proportion of persons who had used anti-hypertensive medication, among those who were aware of their hypertension. The control rate was defined as the proportion of persons who kept blood pressure normal, among those who had been treated for their hypertension. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was carried out for the awarenessrelated factors using SAS VER 8.1. RESULTS: The awareness, treatment, and control rate were 55.8% (53.4% for men; 57.6% for women), 89.6% (87.2% for men; 91.2% for women), and 34.4% (28.1% for men; 38.6% for women), respectively. The awarenessrelated factors included a family history of hypertension (odds ratio[OR], 5.63; 95% confidence interval[95% CI]=1.53-20.72), smoking([Ex; OR 0.38, 95% CI= 0.15- 0.96)], [Current; OR 0.28, 95% CI=0.10-0.80]), and alcohol intake ([Ex; OR 3.22, 95% CI 1.03-10.09],[Current; OR 3.36, 95% CI=1.30-8.71]) for men, and education(OR 2.23, 95% CI=1.10-4.53), body mass index(OR 2.72, 95% CI=1.13-6.53), and self-rated health(OR 2.38, 95% CI=1.07-5.30) for women. CONCLUSIONS: The awareness rate of hypertension among the middle aged and elderly in Chuncheon was 55.8%. The related factors of awareness were gender specific. Further studies are needed to elucidate the putative reasons for these gender differences.
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    Mirae Jo, Heeyoung Oh
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2018; 29(3): 290.     CrossRef
  • Effects of an empowerment program for self‐management among rural older adults with hypertension in South Korea
    Dong‐Soo Shin, Chun‐Ja Kim, Yong‐jun Choi
    Australian Journal of Rural Health.2016; 24(3): 213.     CrossRef
  • Accuracy of Self-reported Hypertension, Diabetes, and Hypercholesterolemia: Analysis of a Representative Sample of Korean Older Adults
    Heeran Chun, Il-Ho Kim, Kyung-Duk Min
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2016; 7(2): 108.     CrossRef
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    Heeran Chun, Il-Ho Kim
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    Hee Kyoung Hyoung, Hyo-Soon Jang
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The Effects of the Parents' Social Class on Infant and Child Death among 1995-2004 Birth Cohort in Korea.
Mia Son, Juhwan Oh, Yong Jun Choi, Jeong Ok Kong, Jisook Choi, Eunjeong Jin, Sung Tae Jung, Se Jin Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(6):469-476.
  • 2,392 View
  • 43 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To investigate the effect of parents' social class on infant and child mortality rates among the birth cohort, for the period of transition to and from the Koran economic crisis 1995-2004. METHODS: All births reported to between 1995 and 2004 (n=5,711,337) were analyzed using a Cox regression model, to study the role of the social determinants of parents in infant and child mortality. The results were adjusted for the parents' age, education and occupation, together with mother's obstetrical history. RESULTS: The crude death rate among those under 10 was 3.71 per 1000 births (21,217 deaths among 5,711,337 births) between 1995 and 2004. The birth cohorts from lower educated parents less than elementary school showed higher mortality rates compared with those from higher educated parents over university level (HR:3.0 (95%CI:2.8-3.7) for father and HR:3.4 (95%CI:3.3-4.5) for mother). The mother's education level showed a stronger relationship with mortality among the birth cohort than that of the fathers'. The gaps in infant mortality rates by parents' social class, and educational level became wider from 1995 to 2004. In particular, the breadth of the existing gap between higher and lower parents' social class groups has dramatically widened since the economic crisis of 1998. DISCUSSIONS: This study shows that social differences exist in infant and child mortality rates. Also, the gap for the infant mortality due to social class has become wider since the economic crisis of 1998.
Summary
Prevalence and Associated Factors of Osteoporosis among Postmenopausal Women in Chuncheon: Hallym Aging Study(HAS).
Soong Nang Jang, Young Ho Choi, Moon Gi Choi, Sung Hyun Kang, Jin Young Jeong, Yong Jun Choi, Dong Hyun Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(5):389-396.
  • 3,856 View
  • 104 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
A community-based, cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine theprevalence of osteoporosis and to evaluate the effects of body composition, health behaviors and reproductive history on bone density in postmenopausal women. METHODS: The study subjects were 362 postmenopausal women, aged 45 years old or over, who were invited to the hospital. Information on their socio-demographic characteristics and the potential risk factors such as their past medical history, smoking, alcohol intake, exercise, diet and menstrual/reproductive histories were collected by trained interviewers. Weight, height, the body mass index (kg/m2), and body composition variables were measured. Bone mineral density of the lumbar spine was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). RESULTS: The prevalence of osteoporosis was 30.6% in the 45~64 years old women, 52.5% in the elderly women aged 65~74, and 68.7% in the women aged 75 years or over. After adjustment for the effect of potential covariates, those women in the highest 25% (4th quartile) of the lean body mass are less likely to have osteoporosis (aOR=0.31, 95% CI=0.12-0.76), compared with the lowest quartile group. More parity also had significantly detrimental effects on osteoporosis. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the prevalence of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women increased with age from 46.3% of those aged 45-64 to 68.7% fo those aged 75 and over. Lean body mass and parity appeared significant contributor to bone mineral density in postmenopausal women in this population.
Summary
Measuring the Burden of Major Cancers in Korea Using Healthy Life-Year (HeaLY).
Yong Jun Choi, Seok Jun Yoon, Chang Yup Kim, Youngsoo Shin
Korean J Prev Med. 2001;34(4):372-378.
  • 2,365 View
  • 38 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study introduced the healthy life-year(HeaLY), a composite indicator of disease burden, and used it to estimate the burden of major cancers in Korea. METHODS: We collected data from the national death certificate database, the national health insurance claims database and the abridged life table. This data was used to create a spreadsheet and estimate the burden of major cancers by sex in terms of HeaLYs. RESULTS: The burden of 10 major cancers for males was 2,248.97 person-year in terms of HeaLYs. Stomach cancer, liver cancer, and lung cancer were responsible for 75.2% of the burden of 10 major cancers The disease burden of 10 major cancers for females was estimated to be 1,567.58 person-years. About two thirds of HeaLYs lost were from stomach cancer, liver cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and breast cancer. The rankings among 10 major cancers were somewhat different in terms of both HeaLYs and deaths as the HeaLY method considers both mortality and morbidity. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the limitations of the data sources, we conclude that HeaLY can aid in setting policy priorities concerning major cancers by estimating the disease burden of these cancers. Time-series analysis of the disease burden using HeaLY and DALY will elucidate the strengths and weaknesses of both methods.
Summary
Health Behaviors Related to Hypertension in Rural Population of Korea.
Chang Yup Kim, Kun Sei Lee, Young Ho Khang, Jun Yim, Yong Jun Choi, Hae Kook Lee, Kyung Ho Lee, Yong Ik Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 2000;33(1):56-68.
  • 2,538 View
  • 44 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To describe health behaviors related to hypertension in rural population of Korea and focused to identify inappropriate awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension. METHODS: We surveyed 5,517 adults (2,288 males, 3,229 females) older than 30 years in 58 rural areas, purposely sampled nationwide from December 1996 to February 1997. Blood pressure was checked twice at the time of the first visit. For those who showed high blood pressure using the JNC-6 criteria at their initial visit, we followed up their blood pressure one week later. Also information on the health behavior related to hypertension was collected through the person-to-person interview using structured questionnaire at the first visit. RESULTS: For the past one year, females had more experiences of checking their blood pressure than males (77.3% versus 69.5%, p=0.001). Through the results of consecutively checked blood pressure, only 51.7% of the hypertensives were aware of their condition. Of the hypertensives who aware of their condition, 44.4% did not receive any medication and/or recommendation. And 50.4% of the hypertensives who had anti-hypertensive medication were classified as still having hypertensive blood pressure by 160/95 mmHg criteria. Of the medicated, 54.8% were found to take medication regularly for the past six months. Among the medicated, only 11.4% knew the name of anti-hypertensive drug they had. CONCLUSIONS: 'Rule of halves', which works in the situation of no special efforts for hypertension control, was identified. This study showed that much efforts to control hypertension would be required in the rural population of Korea.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health