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Sunmi Lee 9 Articles
Estimating the Socioeconomic Costs of Alcohol Drinking Among Adolescents in Korea.
Jaeyeun Kim, Woojin Chung, Sunmi Lee, Chongyon Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(4):341-351.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.4.341
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  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this study was to estimate the socioeconomic costs resulting from alcohol drinking among adolescents as of 2006 from a societal perspective. METHODS: The costs were classified into direct costs, indirect costs, and other costs. The direct costs consisted of direct medical costs and direct non-medical costs. The indirect costs were computed by future income losses from premature death, productivity losses from using medical services and reduction of productivity from drinking and hangover. The other costs consisted of property damage, public administrative expenses, and traffic accident compensation. RESULTS: The socioeconomic costs of alcohol drinking among adolescents as of 2006 were estimated to be 387.5 billion won (0.05% of GDP). In the case of the former, the amount included 48.25% for reduction of productivity from drinking and hangover, 39.38% for future income losses from premature death, and 6.71% for hangover costs. CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that the socioeconomic costs of alcohol drinking among adolescents in Korea were a serious as compared with that of the United States. Therefore, the active interventions such as a surveillance system and a prevention program to control adolescents drinking by government and preventive medicine specialist are needed.
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Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Disparity between Subjective Health Perception and Lifestyle Practices among Korean Adolescents: A National Representative Sample
    Aniceto Echalico Braza, Jinsoo Jason Kim, Sun Hee Kim
    Journal of Lifestyle Medicine.2022; 12(3): 153.     CrossRef
  • Maternal working hours and smoking and drinking in adolescent children: based on the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey VI and VII
    Tae-Hwi Park, Yong-Duk Ahn, Jeong-Bae Rhie
    Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impact of Public Health Policies on Alcohol‐Associated Liver Disease in Latin America: An Ecological Multinational Study
    Luis Antonio Díaz, Francisco Idalsoaga, Eduardo Fuentes‐López, Andrea Márquez‐Lomas, Carolina A. Ramírez, Juan Pablo Roblero, Roberta C. Araujo, Fátima Higuera‐de‐la‐Tijera, Luis Guillermo Toro, Galo Pazmiño, Pedro Montes, Nelia Hernandez, Manuel Mendizab
    Hepatology.2021; 74(5): 2478.     CrossRef
  • Economic burden of alcohol-related cancers in the Republic of Korea
    Minji Han, Binh Thang Tran, Heeyoun Cho, Jin-Kyoung Oh
    Drug and Alcohol Dependence.2020; 217: 108295.     CrossRef
  • An Item Response Theory Analysis of the Korean Version of the CRAFFT Scale for Alcohol Use Among Adolescents in Korea
    Youngshin Song, Hyerang Kim, So-Youn Park
    Asian Nursing Research.2019; 13(4): 249.     CrossRef
  • Development of Addiction Prevention Care Program for Nurses
    Sungjae Kim, Se-Jin Joo, Young Ok Song, Jin-Gyung Cha, Jeongwoon Yang
    STRESS.2019; 27(4): 389.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics of sauna deaths in Korea in relation to different blood alcohol concentrations
    Kyung-Moo Yang, Bong-Woo Lee, Jaeseong Oh, Seong Ho Yoo
    Forensic Science, Medicine and Pathology.2018; 14(3): 307.     CrossRef
  • High prevalence of sarcopenia among binge drinking elderly women: a nationwide population-based study
    Jun-Il Yoo, Yong-Chan Ha, Young-Kyun Lee, Hana-Choi, Moon-Jib Yoo, Kyung-Hoi Koo
    BMC Geriatrics.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • An effective hangover treatment: Friend or foe?
    Marlou Mackus, Marith van Schrojenstein Lantman, Aurora JAE van de Loo, David Nutt, Joris C Verster
    Drug Science, Policy and Law.2017; 3: 205032451774103.     CrossRef
  • Does the Severity of Hangovers Decline with Age? Survey of the Incidence of Hangover in Different Age Groups
    Janne S. Tolstrup, Richard Stephens, Morten Grønbaek
    Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.2014; 38(2): 466.     CrossRef
  • The economic burden of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza in Korea
    Yang-Woo Kim, Seok-Jun Yoon, In-Hwan Oh
    Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases.2013; 45(5): 390.     CrossRef
  • Consumer Satisfaction and Efficacy of the Hangover Cure After-Effect©
    J. C. Verster, O. Berthélemy
    Advances in Preventive Medicine.2012; 2012: 1.     CrossRef
  • Moderate drinking and motivational enhancement therapy
    Kang-Sook Lee
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2011; 54(10): 1047.     CrossRef
Association Between Socioeconomic Status and All-Cause Mortality After Breast Cancer Surgery: Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Study.
Mi Jin Park, Woojin Chung, Sunmi Lee, Jong Hyock Park, Hoo Sun Chang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(4):330-340.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.4.330
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  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study aims to evaluate and explain the socioeconomic inequalities of all-cause mortality after breast cancer surgery in South Korea. METHODS: This population based study included all 8868 females who underwent radical mastectomy for breast cancer between January 2002 and June 2003. Follow-up for mortality continued from January 2002 to June 2006. The patients were divided into 4 socioeconomic classes according to their socioeconomic status as defined by the National Health Insurance contribution rate. The relationship between socioeconomic status and all-cause mortality after breast cancer surgery was assessed using the Cox proportional hazards model with adjusting for age, the Charlson's index score, emergency hospitalization, the type of hospital and the hospital ownership. RESULTS: Those in the lowest socioeconomic status group had a significantly higher hazard ratio of 2.09 (95% CI =1.50 - 2.91) compared with those in the highest socioeconomic group after controlling for all the identifiable confounding variables. For all-cause mortality after radical mastectomy, all the other income groups showed significantly higher 3-year mortality rates than did the highest income group. CONCLUSIONS: The socioeconomic status of breast cancer patients should be considered as an independent prognostic factor that affects all-cause mortality after radical mastectomy, and this is possibly due to a delayed diagnosis, limited access or minimal treatment leading to higher mortality. This study may provide tangible support to intensify surveillance and treatment for breast cancer among low socioeconomic class women.
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  • Higher complication rates after management of lower extremity fractures in lower socioeconomic classes: Are risk adjustment models necessary?
    Jeffrey M Henstenburg, Alexander M Lieber, Anthony J Boniello, Yehuda E Kerbel, Mitesh Shah
    Trauma.2022; 24(2): 131.     CrossRef
  • Income Disparity in Breast Cancer Incidence and Stage at Presentation: A National Population Study of South Korea
    Seung-Ah Choe, Minji Roh, Hye Ri Kim, Soohyeon Lee, Myung Ki, Domyung Paek, Mia Son
    Journal of Breast Cancer.2022; 25(5): 415.     CrossRef
  • Pain-related Prescribing Patterns and Associated Factor in Breast Cancer Patients
    Jin Lee, Ie Byung Park, Hwa Jeong Seo
    Korean Journal of Clinical Pharmacy.2021; 31(2): 115.     CrossRef
  • Higher breast cancer prevalence associated with higher socioeconomic status in the South Korean population; Has it resulted from overdiagnosis?
    Seong-Woo Choi, So-Yeon Ryu, Mi-ah Han, Jong Park, Antonio Palazón-Bru
    PLOS ONE.2018; 13(7): e0200484.     CrossRef
  • Barriers to Cancer Care, Perceived Social Support, and Patient Navigation Services for Korean Breast Cancer Patients
    Jung-won Lim
    Social Work in Health Care.2015; 54(1): 47.     CrossRef
  • Equity in health care: current situation in South Korea
    Hong-Jun Cho
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2013; 56(3): 184.     CrossRef
  • Cancer Control and the Communication Innovation in South Korea: Implications for Cancer Disparities
    Minsoo Jung
    Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.2013; 14(6): 3411.     CrossRef
  • Performance of Papanicolaou Testing and Detection of Cervical Carcinoma In Situ in Participants of Organized Cervical Cancer Screening in South Korea
    Mi Ah Han, Kui Son Choi, Hoo-Yeon Lee, Jae Kwan Jun, Kyu Won Jung, Sokbom Kang, Eun-Cheol Park, Konradin Metze
    PLoS ONE.2012; 7(4): e35469.     CrossRef
Analysis of Willingness-to-Quit Cigarette Price among Korean Male Adults.
Woojin Chung, Sunmi Lee, Kayoung Shin, Seungji Lim, Kyungsook Cho
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(3):136-146.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.3.136
  • 4,407 View
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  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this study was to estimate the willingness to quit cigarette price among Korean male adults, and to examine he factors affecting the willingness to quit cigarette price. METHODS: The data was collected by a random digit dial telephone survey. 702 samples were analyzed by using ttests, ANOVA and OLS regression analysis. To estimate the willingness to quit cigarette price, smokers were asked dichotomous questions with open-ended follow-up and the starting point of the price was randomized by one of 5 bid prices elicited from a pilot study. RESULTS: The mean of the willingness to quit cigarette price was 4,287 Won per package, which was about 2,000 Won higher than the mean of the actual price the smokers now paid. About 41% of respondents were willing to quit smoking if the price of cigarette would be increased by 3,000 Won, and if the price would be increased by 20,000 Won, all respondents were willing to quit smoking. The factors associated with the willingness to quit cigarette price were the place of residence, the amount of smoking and the degree of exposure to smoking through the mass media. CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that to get people to quit smoking, increasing the cigarette price would obviously be effective and much higher prices have a greater effect. Furthermore, to enlarge the effect of increased cigarette prices, providing more cessation programs to small towns, reducing the amount of smoking and decreasing or prohibiting advertisements of cigarettes and smoking in the mass media will be efficient.
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Citations

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  • Factors Associated with Intention to Quit Smoking in Community-dwelling Male Adult Smokers
    Hye-Ran Ahn
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2015; 26(4): 364.     CrossRef
  • Smoking Cessation Intention according to the Level of Cigarette Price Increase among Adolescent Smokers
    Jun Hyun Hwang, Soon-Woo Park
    Journal of the Korean Society of School Health.2014; 27(2): 59.     CrossRef
  • Cigarette Smoking Among Korean International College Students in the United States
    Jaesin Sa, Dong-Chul Seo, Toben F. Nelson, David K. Lohrmann
    Journal of American College Health.2013; 61(8): 454.     CrossRef
  • Secular trends in adult male smoking from 1992 to 2006 in South Korea: Age-specific changes with evolving tobacco-control policies
    E.J. Park, H.K. Koh, J.W. Kwon, M.K. Suh, H. Kim, S.I. Cho
    Public Health.2009; 123(10): 657.     CrossRef
Determinants of Sterilization among Married Couples in Korea.
Ju Hee Kim, Woojin Chung, Sunmi Lee, Moonhee Suh, Dae Ryong Kang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(6):461-466.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.6.461
  • 3,554 View
  • 25 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this study was to examine the determinants of sterilization in South Korea. METHODS: This study was based on the data from the Korea National Fertility Survey carried out in the year 2000 by the Korea Institute of Health and Social Affairs. The subjects of the analysis were 4,604 women and their husbands who were in their first marriage, in the age group of 15-49 years. The data were analyzed by multiple logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Consistent with the findings of previous studies, the woman's age and the number of total children increased the likelihood of sterilization. In addition, the year of marriage had a strong positive association with sterilization. Interestingly, the number of surviving sons tended to increase the likelihood of sterilization, whereas the woman's education level and age at the time of marriage showed a negative association with sterilization. Religion, place of residence, son preference, and the husband's education level, age and type of occupation were not significant determinants of sterilization. CONCLUSIONS: The sex of previous children and lower level of education are distinct determinants of sterilization among women in South Korea. More studies are needed in order to determine the associations between sterilization rate and decreased fertility.
Summary
The Effect of Cigarette Price on Smoking Behavior in Korea.
Woojin Chung, Seungji Lim, Sunmi Lee, Sungjoo Choi, Kayoung Shin, Kyungsook Cho
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(5):371-380.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.5.371
  • 5,482 View
  • 84 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To determine the impact of cigarette prices on the decision to initiate and quit smoking by taking into account the interdependence of smoking and other behavioral risk factors. METHODS: The study population consisted of 3,000 male Koreans aged > or =20. A survey by telephone interview was undertaken to collect information on cigarette price, smoking and other behavioral risk factors. A two-part model was used to examine separately the effect of price on the decision to be a smoker, and on the amount of cigarettes smoked. RESULTS: The overall price elasticity of cigarettes was estimated at -0.66, with a price elasticity of -0.02 for smoking participation and -0.64 for the amount of cigarettes consumed by smokers. The inclusion of other behavioral risk factors reduced the estimated price elasticity for smoking participation substantially, but had no effect on the conditional price elasticity for the quantity of cigarettes smoked. CONCLUSIONS: From the public health and financial perspectives, an increase in cigarette price would significantly reduce smoking prevalence as well as cigarette consumption by smokers in Korea.
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Citations

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  • The Economics of Tobacco Regulation: A Comprehensive Review
    Philip DeCicca, Donald Kenkel, Michael F. Lovenheim
    Journal of Economic Literature.2022; 60(3): 883.     CrossRef
  • Decrease in Smoking and Related Factor after the Price Raise of Tobacco in Hypertension Patients: Using 2015 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Mi Hyun Joo, Mi Ah Han, Jong Park, Seong Woo Choi, So Yeon Ryu, Jun Ho Shin
    Journal of Health Informatics and Statistics.2019; 44(1): 83.     CrossRef
  • Smoking After Age 65 Years and Mortality: The Kangwha Cohort Study
    Byung Heon Cha, Bayasgalan Gombojav, Jae Woong Sull, Heechoul Ohrr
    International Journal of Gerontology.2012; 6(2): 127.     CrossRef
  • SimSmoke Model Evaluation of the Effect of Tobacco Control Policies in Korea: The Unknown Success Story
    David T. Levy, Sung-il Cho, Young-Mee Kim, Susan Park, Mee-Kyung Suh, Sin Kam
    American Journal of Public Health.2010; 100(7): 1267.     CrossRef
  • A Longitudinal Study on the Causal Association Between Smoking and Depression
    Eunjeong Kang, Jaehee Lee
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2010; 43(3): 193.     CrossRef
  • Factors influencing cigarette smoking and quantified implications for anti-smoking policy: evidence from South Korea
    Woojin Chung, Hanjoong Kim, Seungji Lim, Sunmi Lee, Kyungsook Cho
    International Journal of Public Health.2009; 54(6): 409.     CrossRef
Effects of the Late Marriage of Korean Women on the First-birth Interval.
Woojin Chung, Kyoungae Lee, Sunmi Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(3):213-220.
  • 2,210 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of women's late age of marriage on the interval between marriage and their first birth. METHODS: Data from Year 2000 Korea National Fertility Survey was collected through direct interview questionings, and the data was analyzed based on randomly selected sampling. In particular, the married women (N=5,648) were analyzed for the factors that determined the first-birth interval by performing Cox's proportional hazard model survival analysis. RESULTS: Unlike previous findings, the woman whose age of marriage was 30 or more was more likely to delay the birth of her first baby than were the other women who married earlier. Further, a woman's age at marriage, a woman's residence before marriage, her husband's religion, her husband's level of education and the difference in age between the woman and her husband significantly influenced the first-birth interval. In contrast, for a married woman, her age, level of education, current residence and religion were not significant predictors of her first birth interval. CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed that women who married at the age of 30 years or more tend to postpone their first birth in Korea. When facing the increasing number of women who marry at a late age, the Korean government should implement population and social policies to encourage married women have their first child as early as possible.
Summary
Estimating the Cost Saving Due to the Effect of Kremezin in Delaying the Initiation of Dialysis Treatments among Patients with Chronic Renal Failure.
Hye Young Kang, Woohyun Cho, Sunmi Lee, Hyung Jong Kim, Ho Yong Lee, Tae Wook Woo
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(2):149-158.
  • 2,725 View
  • 64 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
We wanted to evaluate the economic value of a pharmaceutical product, Kremezin, for treating patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) by estimating the amount of cost savings due to its effect for delaying the initiation of dialysis treatments. METHODS: We defined a conventional treatment for CRF accompanied by Kremezin therapy as 'the treatment group' and only conventional treatment as 'the alternative group.' The types of costs included were direct medical and nonmedical costs and costs of productivity loss. The information on the effect of Kremezin was obtained from the results of earlier clinical studies. Cost information was derived from the administrative data for 20 hemodialysis and 20 peritoneal dialysis patients from one tertiary care hospital, and also from the administrative data of 10 hemodialysis patients from one free-standing dialysis center. Per-capita cost savings resulting from Kremezin therapy were separately estimated for the cases with delay for the onset of hemodialysis and the cases with immediate performance of peritoneal dialysis. By computing the weighted average for the cases of hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, the expected per-capita cost savings of a patient with CRF was obtained. Using a discount rate of 5%, future cost savings were converted to the present value. RESULTS: The present value of cumulative cost savings per patient with CRF from the societal perspective would be 18,555,000~29,410,000 Won or 72,104,000~112,523,000 Won if Kremezin delays the initiation of dialysis by 1 or 4 years. CONCLUSIONS: The estimated amount of cost savings resulting from treating CRF patients with Kremezin confirms that its effect for delaying the onset of dialysis treatments has a considerable economic value.
Summary
Type of Alcoholic Beverage and High Risk Drinking for Acute Harm.
Woojin Chung, Taiwoo Yoo, Sunmi Lee
Korean J Prev Med. 2003;36(4):383-389.
  • 5,071 View
  • 23 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVE
Studies have suggested that beer is associated with a high risk of mortality and morbidity. The purpose of this study was to investigate how types of alcoholic beverage are related to high risk acute harm. METHODS: Data from the 1997 Korea's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey, collected through telephone questionings, were analyzed based on multi-stage stratified random sampling (N=1, 045). Among those who had drunk at least one type of alcoholic beverage in the last month, one episode where the drinker had consumed the highest level of ethanol was selected, and the alcohol consumption per drinking day categorized into four risk levels of short-term, 'acute' harm, according to the WHO guidelines. Employing ordered logistic regression analyses, as the explanatory variables, types of alcoholic beverage, with and without socioeconomic characteristics, were considered. RESULTS: Spirits and soju were more than ten and three times, respectively, more likely than beer, while makkolli and wine were almost as likely as beer, to involve high risk drinking, irrespective of controlling for the socioeconomic characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: Unlike most Western countries, in Korea, beer, rather than spirits or soju, is generally less likely to be associated with high risk drinking for acute harm. The influence of beverage types on high risk drinking for acute harm appears to vary between countries.
Summary
Smoking-attributable Mortality in Korea, 2020: A Meta-analysis of Four Databases
Eunsil Cheon, Yeun Soo Yang, Suyoung Jo, Jieun Hwang, Keum Ji Jung, Sunmi Lee, Seong Yong Park, Kyoungin Na, Soyeon Kim, Sun Ha Jee, Sung-il Cho
Received October 23, 2023  Accepted May 3, 2024  Published online July 3, 2024  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.471    [Accepted]
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Estimating the number of deaths caused by smoking is crucial for developing and evaluating tobacco control and smoking cessation policies. This study aimed to determine smoking-attributable mortality (SAM) in Korea in 2020.
Methods
Four large-scale cohorts from Korea were analyzed. A Cox proportional-hazards model was used to determine the hazard ratios (HRs) of smoking-related death. By conducting a meta-analysis of these HRs, the pooled HRs of smoking-related death for 41 diseases were estimated. Population-attributable fractions (PAFs) were calculated based on the smoking prevalence for 1995 in conjunction with the pooled HRs. Subsequently, SAM was derived using the PAF and the number of deaths recorded for each disease in 2020.
Results
The pooled HR for all-cause mortality attributable to smoking was 1.73 for current male smokers (95% CI, 1.532-1.954) and 1.631 for current female smokers (95% CI, 1.371-1.94). Smoking accounted for 33.2% of all-cause deaths in men and 4.6% in women. Additionally, it was a factor in 71.8% of male lung cancer deaths and 11.9% of female lung cancer deaths. In 2020, smoking was responsible for 53,930 male deaths and 6,283 female deaths, totaling 60,213 deaths.
Conclusions
Cigarette smoking was responsible for a significant number of deaths in Korea in 2020. Monitoring the impact and societal burden of smoking is essential for effective tobacco control and harm prevention policies.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health