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Min Woo Jo 6 Articles
The Decline of Health-Related Quality of Life Associated with Some Diseases in Korean Adults.
Seol Ryoung Kil, Sang Il Lee, Sung Cheol Yun, Hyung Mi An, Min Woo Jo
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(6):434-441.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.6.434
  • 5,790 View
  • 101 Download
  • 15 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was conducted to measure the decline in the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) associated with some diseases in South Korean adults. METHODS: The EQ-5D health states in the 2005 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHNES) and the Korean EQ-5D valuation set were used to obtain the EQ-5D indexes of the study subjects. Each disease group was defined when the subjects reported to the NHNES that they were diagnosed with the corresponding disease during the previous 1 year by physicians. Since the distributions of the EQ-5D indexes in each subgroup were negatively skewed, median regression analysis was used to estimate the effects of specific diseases on the HRQoL. Median regression analysis produced estimates that approximated the median of the EQ-5D indexes and there are more robust for analyzing data with many outliers. RESULTS: A total of 16,692 subjects (6,667 patients and 10,025 people without any disease) were included in the analysis. As a result of the median regression analysis, stroke had the strongest impact on the HRQoL for both males and females, followed by osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, rheumatic arthritis, and herniation of an intervertebral disc. While asthma had a significant impact on the HRQoL only in men, cataract, temporo-mandibular dysfunction, and peptic ulcer significantly affected the HRQoL only in women. CONCLUSIONS: Stroke and musculoskeletal diseases were associated with the largest losses of the HRQoL in Korean adults.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Health State Utility Values in People With Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta‐Analysis
    Raed A. Joundi, Joel Adekanye, Alexander A. Leung, Paul Ronksley, Eric E. Smith, Alexander D. Rebchuk, Thalia S. Field, Michael D. Hill, Stephen B. Wilton, Lauren C. Bresee
    Journal of the American Heart Association.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Factors Affecting Health-Related Quality of Life in Multimorbidity
    Eunmi Lee, Sunkyung Cha, Geun Myun Kim
    Healthcare.2021; 9(3): 334.     CrossRef
  • Factors Influencing on Health-Related Quality of Life among Men Osteoporosis Patients over 50 Years
    Ji Young Kim, Youngran Yang
    Korean Journal of Adult Nursing.2020; 32(2): 145.     CrossRef
  • Health-Related Quality of Life and Related Factors in Persons with Preserved Ratio Impaired Spirometry: Data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surve
    I Re Heo, Ho Cheol Kim, Tae Hoon Kim
    Medicina.2020; 57(1): 4.     CrossRef
  • Cancer site differences in the health‐related quality of life of Korean cancer survivors: Results from a Population‐based Survey
    Mikyung Ryu, Jee‐In Hwang
    Public Health Nursing.2019; 36(2): 144.     CrossRef
  • Factors affecting the health‐related quality of life in community‐dwelling elderly people
    Geun Myun Kim, Myung Sun Hong, Wonjung Noh
    Public Health Nursing.2018; 35(6): 482.     CrossRef
  • Health-related quality of life assessment according to socio-demographic characteristics and health behavior among Gyeonggi-do citizens: focused on gender difference
    Sun-Hee Joung, YeogSeon Hong, AeRee Sohn
    Korean Journal of Health Education and Promotion.2015; 32(3): 33.     CrossRef
  • Prediction Model for Health-Related Quality of Life of Elderly with Chronic Diseases using Machine Learning Techniques
    Soo-Kyoung Lee, Youn-Jung Son, Jeongeun Kim, Hong-Gee Kim, Jae-Il Lee, Bo-Yeong Kang, Hyeon-Sung Cho, Sungin Lee
    Healthcare Informatics Research.2014; 20(2): 125.     CrossRef
  • A Study on Factors in Quality of Life of Patients with Acute Cerebral Infarction One Year after Diagnosis
    Seung-Ok Shin, So Yeon Ryu
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2014; 15(1): 274.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Arthritis and Comorbid Chronic Conditions on Health-related Quality of Life in Korean Elderly
    Ji-Young No, Soon-Young Kim, In-Sun Kweon, Hae-Sung Nam
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2014; 15(6): 3751.     CrossRef
  • Impact of Post-Stroke Cognitive Impairment with No Dementia on Health-Related Quality of Life
    Jung Hyun Park, Beom Joon Kim, Hee-Joon Bae, Jisung Lee, Juneyoung Lee, Moon-Ku Han, Kyung Yoon O, Seong Ho Park, Yeonwook Kang, Kyung-Ho Yu, Byung-Chul Lee
    Journal of Stroke.2013; 15(1): 49.     CrossRef
  • Difference in Health-related Quality of Life among Social Classes and Related Factors in Korea
    Gyeong-Tae Lim, In-Sun Kwon, Soon-Young Kim, Young-Chae Cho, Hea-Sung Nam
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2012; 13(5): 2189.     CrossRef
  • Relationship between Low Back Pain and Health-Related Quality of Life among Some Elderly
    Kyeong-Ae Oh, Jong Park, Dae-Jung Jeon, Mi-Ah Han, Seong-Woo Choi
    Journal of agricultural medicine and community health.2012; 37(3): 156.     CrossRef
  • Regional differences in health status in China: Population health-related quality of life results from the National Health Services Survey 2008
    Sun Sun, Jiaying Chen, Magnus Johannesson, Paul Kind, Ling Xu, Yaoguang Zhang, Kristina Burström
    Health & Place.2011; 17(2): 671.     CrossRef
  • Population health status in China: EQ-5D results, by age, sex and socio-economic status, from the National Health Services Survey 2008
    Sun Sun, Jiaying Chen, Magnus Johannesson, Paul Kind, Ling Xu, Yaoguang Zhang, Kristina Burström
    Quality of Life Research.2011; 20(3): 309.     CrossRef
General Population Time Trade-off Values for 42 EQ-5D Health States in South Korea.
Min Woo Jo, Sang Il Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(2):169-176.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.2.169
  • 4,891 View
  • 69 Download
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was conducted to elicit quality weights for 42 EQ-5D health states with the time trade-off (TTO) method from the general population of South Korea. METHODS: We selected the same EQ-5D health states as those in the UK MVH study. The Korean version of EQ-5D questionnaire and TTO method were used for the valuation process. We interviewed 500 people as a representative sample of the general population in Seoul and Gyeonggido. The result was compared with those from UK, Japan, and USA by Spearman's rank correlation and t-test. RESULTS: TTO values for 42 EQ-5D health states and 'unconscious' state were obtained from the general South Korean population. The best one was '11112' state and the worst one was 'unconscious' state. The states worse than death were '33323', '33333', and 'unconscious' states, which had negative TTO values. There was a strong correlation between TTO values of the EQ-5D health states and those of their corresponding states from UK, Japan, and USA (Spearman's correlation coefficient: 0.885, 0.882, and 0.944, respectively, p <0.001). However, absolute TTO values of most EQ-5D health states were significantly different from those of their corresponding states in other foreign studies (UK: 41/42, USA: 32/42, Japan: 15/17). CONCLUSIONS: We found that the Korean general population TTO values for EQ-5D health states were different from those of other foreign studies, suggesting that a specific Korean valuation set should be developed and used for economic evaluation studies in South Korea.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association Between Hearing Level and Mental Health and Quality of Life in Adults Aged >40 Years
    Yeonjoo Choi, Junyong Go, Jong Woo Chung
    Journal of Audiology and Otology.2024; 28(1): 52.     CrossRef
  • Health-Related Quality of Life of Post-Stroke Patients in a Public Hospital
    Mijung Jang, Heedong Park, Miyoung Kim, Galam Kang, Hayan Shin, Donghyun Shin, KyooSang Kim
    Brain & Neurorehabilitation.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Factors Affecting the Health-related Quality of Life of Older Adults with Unmet Healthcare Needs Based on the 2018 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Su-Jin Seo, Ju-Hee Nho
    Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursing.2022; 29(2): 258.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Combined Exercise and Far-Infrared Radiation Therapy on The Body Composition, Blood Level, Cortisol, Range of Motion (ROM) and Chronic Pain Level in Elderly Women with Chronic Diseases
    Sang-ho Kim, Bog-ja Jeoung
    Journal of Korean Association of Physical Education and Sport for Girls and Women.2021; 35(1): 127.     CrossRef
  • Effects of the elderly's oral health status and dental care utilization on their health-related quality of life
    Seong Hyeon Chae, Chun-Bae Kim
    Oral Biology Research.2019; 43(1): 88.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics of the Elderly that Influence the Efficient Provision of Healthcare Web Services
    Eun-Young Jung, Hyung-Wook Kang, Dong-Kyun Park
    International Journal of Contents.2016; 12(1): 14.     CrossRef
  • Health-Related Quality of Life in Korean Adults with Hearing Impairment: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2010 to 2012
    Min Kwan Baek, Young Saing Kim, Eun Young Kim, Ae Jin Kim, Won-Jun Choi, Pietro Cipresso
    PLOS ONE.2016; 11(10): e0163999.     CrossRef
  • The Incidence and Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome in Rural Area
    Hee-Jung Yoon, Sung-Kook Lee
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2015; 16(6): 3934.     CrossRef
  • Health-related quality of life according to breakfast in elderly
    Ji-Yeon Kim
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2015; 16(7): 4668.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Staged Education Program for Hypertension, Diabetes Patients in a Community (Assessment of Quality of Life Using EQ-5D)
    Jung Jeung Lee, Hye Jin Lee, Eun Jin Park
    Journal of agricultural medicine and community health.2014; 39(1): 37.     CrossRef
  • Levels of Health-related Quality of Life (EQ-5D) and Its Related Factors among Vulnerable Elders Receiving Home Visiting Health Care Services in Some Rural Areas
    Jong Im Kim
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2013; 24(1): 99.     CrossRef
  • Estimating Quality Weights for EQ-5D Health States with the Time Trade-Off Method in South Korea
    Min-Woo Jo, Sung-Cheol Yun, Sang-Il Lee
    Value in Health.2008; 11(7): 1186.     CrossRef
Changes in Mortality Inequality in Relation to the South Korean Economic Crisis: Use of Area-based Socioeconomic Position.
Young Ho Khang, Sung Cheol Yun, In A Hwang, Moo Song Lee, Sang Il Lee, Min Woo Jo, Min Jung Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2005;38(3):359-365.
  • 2,200 View
  • 61 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVE
An abrupt economic decline may widen the socioeconomic differences in health between the advantaged and disadvantaged in a society. The aim of this study was to examine whether the South Korean economic crisis of 1997-98 affected the socioeconomic inequality from all-causes and from cause-specific mortality between 1995 and 2001. METHODS: Population denominators were obtained from the registration population data, with the number of death (numerators) calculated from raw death certificate data. The indicator used to assess the geographic socioeconomic position was the per capita regional tax revenue. Administrative districts (Si-Gun-Gu) were ranked according to this socioeconomic measure, and divided into equal population size quintiles on the basis of this ranking. The sex- and 5-year age-specific numbers of the population and deaths were used to compute the sex- and age-adjusted mortality rates (via direct standardization method), standardized mortality ratios (via indirect standardization methods) and relative indices of inequality (RII) (via Poisson regression). RESULTS: Geographic inequalities from all-causes of mortality, as measured by RII, did not increase as a result of the economic crisis (from 1998-2001). This was true for both sexes and all age groups. However, the cause-specific analyses showed that socioeconomic inequalities in mortalities from external causes were affected by South Korean economic crisis. For males, the RIIs for mortalities from transport accidents and intentional self-harm increased between 1995 and 2001. For females, the RII for mortality from intentional self-harm increased during the same period. CONCLUSIONS: The South Korean economic crisis widened the geographic inequality in mortalities from major external causes. This increased inequality requires social discourse and counter policies with respect to the rising health inequalities in the South Korean society.
Summary
Census Population vs. Registration Population: Which Population Denominator Should be used to Calculate Geographical Mortality.
Young Ho Khang, In A Hwang, Sung Cheol Yun, Moo Song Lee, Sang Il Lee, Min Woo Jo, Min Jung Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2005;38(2):147-153.
  • 2,447 View
  • 46 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Studies on the geographical differences in mortality tend to use a census population, rather than a registration population, as the denominator of mortality rates in South Korea. However, an administratively determined registration population would be the logical denominator, as the geographical areas for death certificates (numerator) have been determined by the administratively registered residence of the deceased, rather than the actual residence at the time of death. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in the total number of a district population, and the associated district-specific mortality indicators, when two different measures as a population denominator (census and registration) were used. METHODS: Population denominators were obtained from census and registration population data, and the numbers of deaths (numerators) were calculated from raw death certificate data. Sex- and 5-year age-specific numbers for the populations and deaths were used to compute sex- and age-standardized mortality rates (by direct standardization methods) and standardized mortality ratios (by indirect standardization methods). Bland-Altman tests were used to compare district populations and district-specific mortality indicators according to the two different population denominators. RESULTS: In 1995, 9 of 232 (3.9%) districts were not included in the 95% confidence interval (CI) of the population differences. A total of 8 (3.4%) among 234 districts had large differences between their census and registration populations in 2000, which exceeded the 95% CI of the population differences. Most districts (13 of 17) exceeding the 95% CI were rural. The results of the sexand age-standardized mortality rates showed 15 (6.5%) and 16 (6.8%) districts in 1995 and 2000, respectively, were not included in the 95% CI of the differences in their rates. In addition, the differences in the standardized mortality ratios using the two different population denominators were significantly greater among 14 districts in 1995 and 11 districts in 2002 than the 95% CI. Geographical variations in the mortality indicators, using a registration population, were greater than when using a census population. CONCLUSION: The use of census population denominators may provide biased geographical mortality indicators. The geographical mortality rates when using registration population denominators are logical, but do not necessarily represent the exact mortality rate of a certain district. The removal of districts with large differences between their census and registration populations or associated mortality indicators should be considered to monitor geographical mortality rates in South Korea.
Summary
Proportion of Death Certificates Issued by Physicians and Associated Factors in Korea, 1990-2002.
Min Woo Jo, Young Ho Khang, Sungcheol Yun, Jin Yong Lee, Moo Song Lee, Sang Il Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2004;37(4):345-352.   Published online November 30, 2004
  • 2,250 View
  • 59 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Previous studies showed that death certification by physicians was an important predictor to improve the quality of death certificate data in South Korea. This study was conducted to examine the proportion of death certificates issued by physicians and associated factors in South Korea from 1990 to 2002. METHODS: Data from 3, 110, 883 death certificates issued between 1990 and 2002, available to the public from the National Statistical Office of Korea, were used to calculate the proportion of death certificates issued by physicians and to examine associated factors with logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: The overall proportion of death certificates issued by physicians increased from 44.6% in 1990 to 77.6% in 2002 (mean: 63.5%). However, the proportion was greatly influenced by the deceased's age. In 2002, more than 90% of the deceased aged 51 or less were certified by physicians. A higher proportion was found among deceased who had tertiary education (college or higher) living in more developed urban areas. CONCLUSION: The information regarding the cause of death for younger, well-educated deceased in urban areas of South Korea may show a higher level of accuracy. Epidemiologic research using information on causes of death may well benefit from the continually increasing proportion of death certificates issued by physicians in the future in South Korea.
Summary
Efficient DRG Fraud Candidate Detection Method Using Data Mining Techniques.
Duho Hong, Jung Kyu Lee, Min Woo Jo, Kidong Park, Sang Il Lee, Moo Song Lee, Chang Yup Kim, Yong Ik Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 2003;36(2):147-152.
  • 21,212 View
  • 30 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To develop a Diagnosis-Related Group (DRG) fraud candidate detection method, using data mining techniques, and to examine the efficiency of the developed method. METHODS: The study included 79, 790 DRGs and their related claims of 8 disease groups (Lens procedures, with or without, vitrectomy, tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy only, appendectomy, Cesarean section, vaginal delivery, anal and/or perianal procedures, inguinal and/or femoral hernia procedures, uterine and/or adnexa procedures for nonmalignancy), which were examined manually during a 32 months period. To construct an optimal prediction model, 38 variables were applied, and the correction rate and lift value of 3 models (decision tree, logistic regression, neural network) compared. The analyses were performed separately by disease group. RESULTS: The correction rates of the developed method, using data mining techniques, were 15.4 to 81.9%, according to disease groups, with an overall correction rate of 60.7%. The lift values were 1.9 to 7.3 according to disease groups, with an overall lift value of 4.1. CONCLUSIONS: The above findings suggested that the applying of data mining techniques is necessary to improve the efficiency of DRG fraud candidate detection.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health