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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

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Min Kyung Lim 2 Articles
The Current Status of Utilization and Demand on Cancer Information in the Faculties of Medical School in Korea.
Min Kyung Lim, Sook Kyung Park, Jeong Hee Yang, Young Sung Lee
Korean J Prev Med. 2003;36(1):39-46.
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OBJECTIVES
To investigate the availability and demand for overall cancer-related information, and to establish a basic plan for the construction of a cancer database and information system based on the research results from Korea. METHODS: Postal and telephone surveys were carried out, between August 2001 and November 2001, of 323 affiliated faculty professors from medical universities and colleges in Korea. The data were analyzed with descriptive statistical methods, with regard to the present status and demand for health and cancer-related information. RESULTS: Most (over 80%) subjects studied utilized the health-related information provided on Internet website from foreign countries, such as Medline, but similar comprehensive information system lacked in Korea. The construction of a cancer-related database of domestic research results was revealed to be in a great demand. Information on registration and statistics (52.8%), study results (48.5%) and study resources (37.4%) were the major ingredients required in the database. In constructing a database of the cancer-related research results, a full-text service, continuous updating of data, and the development of standardized user-friendly searching tool were regarded as the necessary components. The formulation of an information sharing system, regarding cancer-related clinical trials, was investigated as being quite feasible. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated the great importance of cancer information systems, and much demand for an available cancer-related database based on Korean research results.
Summary
A Study on the Correlation between Categorization of the Individual Exposure Levels to Agent Orange and Serum Dioxin Levels Among the Korean Vietnam Veterans.
Joung Soon Kim, Han K Kang, Hyun Sul Lim, Hae Kwan Cheong, Min Kyung Lim
Korean J Prev Med. 2001;34(1):80-88.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
In an epidemiologic study on the health impact of Agent Orange exposure, the valid estimation of exposure level is the most important step. Based on recent studies, we examined the correlation between exposure levels categorized by personal exposure estimates and serum 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD, Dioxin), exploring the possibility of utilizing the exposure level as a surrogate for the estimate of exposure to agent orange. METHODS: During the study period (Jan 1996-Feb 1996), blood specimens of 745 subjects taken randomly among 1,329 persons and kept frozen, were analyzed for 2,3,7,8-TCDD and six other dioxin congeners. The serum dioxin and congeners were measured in 1998 by CDC ,adjusted for serum lipids. We categorized the total exposure scores into five groups based on Agent Orange exposure data collected by interview and military records. Pearson and Spearman's correlation coefficients & multiple regression analysis were used to identify the relationship of the exposure level categorized with serum concentration of 2,3,7,8-TCDD, and six other dioxin congeners. RESULTS: Dioxin and the other congeners, except 1,2,4,6,7,8-HpCDD, showed significant correlations to exposure categories (p<0.005); 2,3,7,8-TCDD and OCDD showed positive correlations, whereas the other congeners did negative. The values of 2,3,7,8-TCDD differed according to exposure category and proportionally increased from the low exposure group to the high, a dose-response relationship, even after other possible confounding variables were adjusted for. In multiple regression analysis, age(beta=0.033), dioxin(beta=0.433), 1,2,3,7,8-PeCDD(beta=0.998), 1,2,3,4,7,8-HxCDD(beta=0.773), 1,2,3,6,7,8-HxCDD(beta=0.255), 1,2,3,7,8,9-HxCDD(beta=3.468), 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDD(beta=0.109) were found to be significantly related to the total exposure score(p<0.005). CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that the use of such categorizations as a surrogate measure of agent orange exposure in identifying exposure degrees in a health impact study is valid.
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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health