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Jong Han Leem 4 Articles
The Association of Central Obesity with Type 2 Diabetes among Koreans according to the Serum Gamma-Glutamyltransferase Level: Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study.
Ji Yeon Shin, Jun Hyun Hwang, Jin Young Jeong, Sung Hi Kim, Jai Dong Moon, Sang Chul Roh, Young Wook Kim, Yangho Kim, Jong Han Leem, Young Su Ju, Young Seoub Hong, Eun Hee Ha, Yong Hwan Lee, Duk Hee Lee, Dong Hyun Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(6):386-391.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.6.386
  • 5,456 View
  • 64 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This cross-sectional study was performed to examine if the serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) level that is within its normal range is associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes and if the association between the waist hip ratio (WHR) and type 2 diabetes is different depending on the serum GGT levels. METHODS: The study subjects were 23,436 persons aged 40 years or older and who participated in regular health check-ups at 11 hospitals (males: 5,821, females: 17,615). The gender-specific quintiles of the serum GGT and WHR were used to examine the associations with type 2 diabetes. RESULTS: The serum GGT levels within their normal range were positively associated with type 2 diabetes only in women. The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were 1.0, 1.0, 1.4, 2.1, and 2.5 according to the quintiles of the serum GGT (p(trend)<0.01). The WHR was more strongly associated with the prevalence of diabetes among the women with a high-normal serum GGT level as compared with those with a low-normal serum GGT level (p for interaction=0.02). For example, the adjusted ORs for women with a low normal serum GGT level were 1.0, 1.2, 1.5, 2.2, and 2.4 according to the quintiles of the WHR, while those figures were 1.0, 2.4, 3.6, 5.0, and 8.3 among the women with a high normal serum GGT level. However, in men, the serum GGT was very weakly associated with type 2 diabetes and the association between the WHR and type 2 diabetes was not different depending on the serum GGT level. CONCLUSIONS: Serum GGT within its normal range was positively associated with type 2 diabetes, and central obesity was more strongly associated with the prevalence of type 2 diabetes when the serum GGT level was high-normal. However, these associations were observed only in women, which is different from the previous findings. The stronger relation between central obesity and type 2 diabetes among women with a high-normal serum GGT level can be useful for selecting a group that is at high risk for type 2 diabetes irregardless of whatever the underlying mechanism is.
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  • Serum gamma-glutamyl transferase and risk of type 2 diabetes in the general Korean population: a Mendelian randomization study
    Youn Sue Lee, Yoonsu Cho, Stephen Burgess, George Davey Smith, Caroline L. Relton, So-Youn Shin, Min-Jeong Shin
    Human Molecular Genetics.2016; 25(17): 3877.     CrossRef
  • Different associations between obesity and impaired fasting glucose depending on serum gamma-glutamyltransferase levels within normal range: a cross-sectional study
    Nam Soo Hong, Jeong-Gook Kim, Yu-Mi Lee, Hyun-Woo Kim, Sin Kam, Keon-Yeop Kim, Ki-Su Kim, Duk-Hee Lee
    BMC Endocrine Disorders.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Endobiogeny: A Global Approach to Systems Biology (Part 1 of 2)
    Jean-Claude, Lapraz, Kamyar M. Hedayat
    Global Advances in Health and Medicine.2013; 2(1): 64.     CrossRef
The Effect of Smoking Status upon Occurrence of Impaired Fasting Glucose or Type 2 Diabetes in Korean Men.
Chang Hae Park, Hyuk Ga, Jong Han Leem, Seung Min Kwak, Hwan Cheol Kim, Ji Ho Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(4):249-254.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.4.249
  • 5,202 View
  • 69 Download
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To investigate whether smoking and the smoking status are predictors of the incident impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or type 2 diabetes in Korean men. METHODS: A cohort of 1,717 Korean men without IFG or diabetes, who underwent annual periodic health examinations for 4 years (2002-2006), were retrospectively investigated. IFG and diabetes were defined as a serum fasting glucose concentration of 100-125 mg/dL and more than 126 mg/dL, respectively. Cox's proportional hazards model was used to evaluate the association between smoking and development of IFG or type 2 diabetes. RESULTS: A total of 558 cases (32.5%) of incident IFG and 50 cases (2.9%) of diabetes occurred. After controlling for the potential predictors of diabetes, the relative risk for IFG, compared with the never smokers, was 1.02 (95% CI=0.88 to 1.19) for the ever-smokers, 0.96 (95% CI=0.79-1.16) for those who smoked 1-9 cigarettes/d, 1.15 (95% CI=1.01 to 1.30) for those who smoked 10-19 cigarettes/d, and 1.31 (95% CI=1.10 to 1.57) for those who smoked 20 or more cigarettes/d (the P value for the current smokers was only p<0.002). The respective multivariate adjusted relative risks for type 2 diabetes, compared with the neversmokers, were 1.07 (95% CI=0.64 to 1.92), 1.47 (95% CI=0.71 to 3.04), 1.84 (95% CI=0.92-3.04), and 1.87 (95% CI=1.13-3.67), respectively (the P value for the current smokers was only p=0.004). CONCLUSIONS: The smoking status and the number of cigarettes smoked daily are associated with an increased risk for developing IFG or type 2 diabetes in Korean men.
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  • Health effects associated with smoking: a Burden of Proof study
    Xiaochen Dai, Gabriela F. Gil, Marissa B. Reitsma, Noah S. Ahmad, Jason A. Anderson, Catherine Bisignano, Sinclair Carr, Rachel Feldman, Simon I. Hay, Jiawei He, Vincent Iannucci, Hilary R. Lawlor, Matthew J. Malloy, Laurie B. Marczak, Susan A. McLaughlin
    Nature Medicine.2022; 28(10): 2045.     CrossRef
  • Systematic review with meta-analysis of the epidemiological evidence relating smoking to type 2 diabetes
    Peter N Lee, Katharine J Coombs
    World Journal of Meta-Analysis.2020; 8(2): 119.     CrossRef
  • The 2016 global and national burden of diabetes mellitus attributable to PM 2·5 air pollution
    Benjamin Bowe, Yan Xie, Tingting Li, Yan Yan, Hong Xian, Ziyad Al-Aly
    The Lancet Planetary Health.2018; 2(7): e301.     CrossRef
  • The impact of smoking on the development of diabetes and its complications
    Mariola Śliwińska-Mossoń, Halina Milnerowicz
    Diabetes and Vascular Disease Research.2017; 14(4): 265.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Nutrition Education on Improvement of Blood Glucose in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Low Income
    Eun-Jin Lim, Mi Jeong Kim, Ji-Sook Han
    Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition.2014; 43(1): 141.     CrossRef
  • Associated Factors of Impaired Fasting Glucose in Some Korean Rural Adults
    Hye Eun Yun, Mi-ah Han, Ki Soon Kim, Jong Park, Myeng Guen Kang, So Yeon Ryu
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2010; 43(4): 309.     CrossRef
  • Association of passive and active smoking with incident type 2 diabetes mellitus in the elderly population: the KORA S4/F4 cohort study
    Bernd Kowall, Wolfgang Rathmann, Klaus Strassburger, Margit Heier, Rolf Holle, Barbara Thorand, Guido Giani, Annette Peters, Christine Meisinger
    European Journal of Epidemiology.2010; 25(6): 393.     CrossRef
  • Diabetes and impaired fasting glucose in Mongolian population, Inner Mongolia, China
    Shaoyan Zhang, Weijun Tong, Tan Xu, Burenbatu Wu, Yonghong Zhang
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice.2009; 86(2): 124.     CrossRef
Environmental Health Surveillance of Low Birth Weight in Seoul using Air Monitoring and Birth Data.
Ju Hee Seo, Eun Hee Ha, Ok Jin Kim, Byung Mi Kim, Hye Sook Park, Jong Han Leem, Yun Chul Hong, Young Ju Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(5):363-370.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.5.363
  • 4,405 View
  • 46 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The principal objective of this study was to determine the relationship between maternal exposure to air pollution and low birth weight and to propose a possible environmental health surveillance system for low birth weight. METHODS: We acquired air monitoring data for Seoul from the Ministry of Environment, the meteorological data from the Korean Meteorological Administration, the exposure assessments from the National Institute of Environmental Research, and the birth data from the Korean National Statistical Office between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2003. The final birth data were limited to singletons within 37~44 weeks of gestational age. We defined the Low Birth Weight (LBW) group as infants with birth weights of less than 2500g and calculated the annual LBW rate by district. The air monitoring data were measured for CO, SO2, NO2, and PM10 concentrations at 27 monitoring stations in Seoul. We utilized two models to evaluate the effects of air pollution on low birth weight: the first was the relationship between the annual concentration of air pollution and low birth weight (LBW) by individual and district, and the second involved a GIS exposure model constructed by Arc View 3.1. RESULTS: LBW risk (by Gu, or district) was significantly increased to 1.113(95% CI=1.111~1.116) for CO, 1.004 (95% CI=1.003~1.005) for NO2, 1.202(95% CI=1.199~ 1.206) for SO2, and 1.077(95% CI=1.075~1.078) for PM10 with each interquartile range change. Personal LBW risk was significantly increased to 1.081(95% CI=1.002~1.166) for CO, 1.145(95% CI=1.036~1.267) for SO2, and 1.053(95% CI=1.002~1.108) for PM10 with each interquartile range change. Personal LBW risk was increased to 1.003(95% CI=0.954~1.055) for NO2, but this was not statistically significant. The air pollution concentrations predicted by GIS positively correlated with the numbers of low birth weights, particularly in highly polluted regions. CONCLUSIONS: Environmental health surveillance is a systemic, ongoing collection effort including the analysis of data correlated with environmentally-associated diseases and exposures. In addition, environmental health surveillance allows for a timely dissemination of information to those who require that information in order to take effective action. GIS modeling is crucially important for this purpose, and thus we attempted to develop a GIS-based environmental surveillance system for low birth weight.
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  • Spatiotemporal association of low birth weight with Cs-137 deposition at the prefecture level in Japan after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accidents: an analytical-ecologic epidemiological study
    Hagen Scherb, Keiji Hayashi
    Environmental Health.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Current State of Research on the Risk of Morbidity and Mortality Associated with Air Pollution in Korea
    Sanghyuk Bae, Ho-jang Kwon
    Yonsei Medical Journal.2019; 60(3): 243.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Nitric Oxide Pollution on Oxidative Stress in Pregnant Women Living in Durban, South Africa
    Samantha M. Anderson, Rajen N. Naidoo, Prithiksha Ramkaran, Alisa Phulukdaree, Sheena Muttoo, Kareshma Asharam, Anil A. Chuturgoon
    Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology.2018; 74(2): 228.     CrossRef
  • HIV induced nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation, influences neonatal birthweight in a South African population
    Samantha M. Anderson, Rajen N. Naidoo, Yashodani Pillay, Charlette Tiloke, Sheena Muttoo, Kareshma Asharam, Anil A. Chuturgoon
    Environment International.2018; 121: 1.     CrossRef
  • Outdoor Air Pollution, Preterm Birth, and Low Birth Weight: Analysis of the World Health Organization Global Survey on Maternal and Perinatal Health
    Nancy L. Fleischer, Mario Merialdi, Aaron van Donkelaar, Felipe Vadillo-Ortega, Randall V. Martin, Ana Pilar Betran, João Paulo Souza
    Environmental Health Perspectives.2014; 122(4): 425.     CrossRef
  • Burden of Disease Due to Outdoor Air Pollution in Korea: Based on PM10
    Hyun-Jin Kim, Seok-Jun Yoon, Hyeong-Su Kim, Kun-Sei Lee, Eun-Jung Kim, Min-Woo Jo, In-Hwan Oh
    Korean Journal of Environmental Health Sciences.2011; 37(5): 387.     CrossRef
Exposure Assessment of PCDD/Fs and Monitoring of Health Effects on Workers and Residents near the Waste Incinerators in Korea.
Jong Han Leem, Yun Chul Hong, Kwan Hee Lee, Ho Jang Kwon, Jae Yeon Jang
Korean J Prev Med. 2003;36(4):314-322.
  • 46,811 View
  • 36 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
In this study, the exposure status of the hazardous substances from incinerators, such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), were studied, and the relationship between the exposure of these hazardous substances and their heath effects on the workers and residents near municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerators and an industrial incinerator investigated. METHODS: Between July 2001 and June 2002, 13 workers at two MSW incinerators, 16 residents from the area around the two MSW incinerators, 6 residents from the control area, and further 10 residents near an industrial incinerator, estimated to emit higher levels of hazardous substances, were interviewed. Information, including sociodemographic information, personal habits, and work history, detailed gynecologic and other medical history were collected through interviews. Blood samples were also collected from 45 subjects, and analyzed for PCDD/DFs, by high resolution gas chromatography - high resolution mass spectrometry, using the US EPA 1613 method. In addition to the questionnaire survey, urinary concentrations of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured as oxidative injury biomarkers. The urinary concentrations of 8-OH-dG were determined by in vitro ELISA, and the MDA by HPLC, using an adduct with thiobarbituric acid. RESULTS: The PCDD/DFs concentrations in the residents near the industrial incinerator were higher than those in the controls, workers and residents near the MSW incinerators. The average TEQ (Toxic Equivalencies) concentrations of the PCDD/DFs in residents near the industrial incinerator were 53.4pg I-TEQs/g lipid. The estimated daily intakes were within the tolerable daily intake range (1-4 pg I-TEQ/Kg bw/day) suggested by WHO (1997) in only 30% to the people near the industrial incinerator. Animal studies have already shown that even a low body burden of PCDD/DFs, such as 10ng TEQ/kg bw, can cause oxidative damage in laboratory animals. Our study also showed that the same body burden of PCDD/DFs can cause oxidative damage to humans. CONCLUSIONS: The exposures to PCDD/DFs and the oxidative stress of residents near the industrial incinerator, were higher than those in the controls, workers and residents near the MSW incinerators. Proper protection strategies against these hazardous chemicals are needed. Because a lower body burden of PCDD/Fs, such as 10ng TEQ/kg bw, can cause oxidative damage, the tolerable daily intake range should be restrictedly limited to 1pg I-TEQ/kg bw/day.
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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health