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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

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Jae Heon Kang 4 Articles
Mortality among Medical Doctors Based on the Registered Cause of Death in Korea 1992-2002.
You Cheol Shin, Jae Heon Kang, Cheol Hwan Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2005;38(1):38-44.
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  • 69 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVE
To compare the mortality rate of Korean medical doctors to that of the general Korean population for the period 1992-2002. METHODS: The membership records of the Korean Medical Association were linked to the 1992-2002 death certificate data of Korea's National Statistical Office using 13-digit unique personal identification numbers. The study population consisted of 61, 164 medical doctors with a follow-up period of 473, 932 person-years. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated to compare cause-specific mortality rates of medical doctors to those of the general population. RESULTS: We confirmed 1, 150 deaths at ages from 30 to 75 years from 1 January 1992 to 31 December 2002. The SMR for all-cause of death was 0.47 (95% CI : 0.44~0.50). The SMRs for smoking-related diseases such as cerebrovascular accidents and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were smaller than the SMR of all-cause of death. However, the SMRs for colorectal and pancreatic cancers were not significantly lower than those of the general population. Transport accidents and suicides accounted for 72% (94 of 131) of external causes of death. The SMR for suicide was 0.51 (95% CI : 0.38~0.68). CONCLUSIONS: The mortality rate of South Korean medical doctors was less than 50% that of the general population of South Korea. Cause-specific analysis showed that mortality rates in leading causes of death were lower among medical doctors although differences in mortality rates between medical doctors and the general population varied with the causes of death. These health benefits found among medical doctors may be attributable to the lower level of health damaging behaviors (e.g., lower smoking rates) and better working conditions.
Summary
Socioeconomic Costs of Obesity for Korean Adults.
Baek Geun Jeong, Ok Ryun Moon, Nam Soon Kim, Jae Heon Kang, Tae Ho Yoon, Sang Yi Lee, Sin Jae Lee
Korean J Prev Med. 2002;35(1):1-12.
  • 2,530 View
  • 51 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVE
To estimate the socioeconomic costs of obesity in Korea, 1998. METHODS: The 1998 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1998 NHNES) data was used and 10,880 persons who had taken health examinations were selected for study. Essential hypertension, NIDDM (non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus), dyslipidemia, osteoarthritis, coronary heart disease, stroke were included as obesity related disease. The data of direct costs of obesity was obtained from the National Federation of Medical Insurance. The category of indirect costs was the loss of productivity caused by premature death and admission, time costs, traffic costs, nursing fees due to obesity. Multiple logistic regression model was developed to estimate prevalence odds ratio by obesity class adjusted demographic and socio-ecnomic factors and calculate PAF (Population Attributable Fraction) of obesity on obesity related disease. And we finally calculated the socioeconomic costs of obesity in relation to BMI with PAF. RESULTS: The direct costs of obesity were 2,126 billion~965 billion Won in considering out of pocket payment to uninsured services, and the indirect costs of obesity were 2,099 billion~1,086 billion Won. Consequently, in considering out of pocket payment to uninsured services, the socioeconomic costs of obesity were 4,225 billion~2,050 billion Won, which corresponded to about 0.094% ~0.046% of GDP and 1.88%~0.91 of total health care costs in Korea. CONCLUSIONS: Obesity represents a major health problem with significant economic implications for the society. This results are conservative estimates as far as all obesity related disease and all health care and indirect costs were not included due to missing information. Further studies are needed to caculate socioeconomic costs of obesity more exactly.
Summary
Increasing Prevalence of Obesity Related Disease for Koreans Associated with Overweight and Obesity.
Nam Soon Kim, Ok Ryun Moon, Jae Heon Kang, Sang Yi Lee, Baek Geun Jeong, Sin Jae Lee, Tae Ho Yoon, Kyung Hwa Hwang
Korean J Prev Med. 2001;34(4):309-315.
  • 2,693 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVE
To develop a better understanding of the relationship between weight status and the prevalence of obesity related diseases in the Korean population. METHODS: The 1998 Korean National Health and Nutrition Survey was used and 10,880 persons who had previously taken health examinations were selected for study. The Korean Society for the Study of Obesity's classification of weight status was used. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, osteoarthritis, chronic heart disease, stroke were included as obesity related disease. A logistic regression model was developed to estimate the prevalence odds ratio by obesity class adjusted for demographic and socio-economic factors and we converted the odds ratio to a prevalence ratio using the base line prevalence of disease to aid in the interpretation of the ratios. RESULTS: The prevalence of obesity was 26.3% based on the KSSO classification (BMI> or =25). A graded increase in the prevalence ratio was observed with increasing severity of overweight and obesity for all health outcomes with the exception of chronic heart disease in men and stroke in both men and women. With normal weight individuals as the reference, for men who were younger than 50 years, the prevalence ratios were highest for hypertension BMI<23-25: 1.70(95% CI=1.41-2.05), 25 or =30: 4.83(95% CI=3.78-5.84). The prevalence ratios for dyslipidemia were as high as hypertension, but were lower than hypertension for diabetes mellitus and osteoarthritis. Prevalence ratios generally were greater in younger adults. The prevalence of having 2 or more obesity related diseases increased with weight status category, except in people who were older than 50 years. CONCLUSIONS: Based on results, obesity is an increasingly important health problem in Korea and the disease burden increases according to weight status. For Korean adults, the strongest relationship was seen between weight status and hypertension and dyslipidemia. In older people the impact of excess weight and obesity is stronger than that seen in younger people. Increased efforts in the study of obesity and prevention and treatment of obesity and obesity related disease are required.
Summary
A Telephone Survey on the Opinions about Family Doctor.
Hong Gwan Seo, Jae Heon Kang, Cheol Hwan Kim, Seong Won Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 1998;31(2):310-322.
  • 2,296 View
  • 22 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
In order to reinforce the role of primary care physician and to improve doctor-patient relationship, the Korean government tried to introduce 'Family Doctor Registration Program' into Seocho-Gu in Seoul, Ansung-Gun and Paju city in Kyunggi-Do in Oct. 1996. Community residents and doctors in those area did not show much interest in this project because of low incentives. We have done this study to see how much people know 'Family Doctor Registration Program' and what is people's real needs about 'Family Doctor Registration Program. We selected l,800 telephone numbers in Seoul, Chongju city, and Ansung-Gun by multi-stage stratified random sampling. Three trained survey personnels called them and got answers to the premade questionnaire until they completed the questionnaires of 200 persons in each community. The calling time was 7-9 p.m. from Monday to Friday, 3-9 p.m. on Saturday, and 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Sunday. We dropped out the persons who did not respond 3 times. The subjects consisted of 222 male and 367 female residents. Their ages ranged from 20 to 78: 24.8% in their 30s, 23.4% in their 20s, 22.5% in their 40s in male, and 35.2% in their 30s, 22.5% in their 40s, 18.5% in their 20s in female. 9.9% of male and 13.2% of female had their Family Doctors. The specialties of their Family, Doctors were internists in 56.2%, general surgeons in ll.0%. The persons who did not have their family, doctors were asked which doctors they would prefer if they had choices of family doctor. The results were internists in 50.3%, family physicians in 13.0%, pediatricians in 4.8%. Only 16.0% residents knew that government tried to introduce Family Doctor Registration Program. The 'Family Doctor Registration Program' was not well known to people. The results of our study showed that more effective incentives and public notifications are needed to activate this program.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health