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Il Soon Kim 6 Articles
The Korean Prediction Model for Adolescents' Future Smoking Intentions.
Sungkyu Lee, Ji Eun Yun, Ja Kyoung Lee, Il Soon Kim, Sun Ha Jee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(4):283-291.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.4.283
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  • 20 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this study was to develop a prediction model for future smoking intention among Korean adolescents aged 13 to 15 in order to identify the high risk group exposed to future smoking. METHODS: The data was collected from a total of 5940 students who participated in a self-administrated questionnaire of a cross-sectional school-based survey, the 2004 Korea Global Youth Tobacco Survey. Chi-square tests and logistic regression analyses were carried out to identify the relevant determinants associated with intentions of adolescents' future smoking. Receiver Operation Characteristic (ROC) assessment was applied to evaluate the explanation level of the developed prediction model. RESULTS: 8.4% of male and 7.2% of female participants show their intentions of future smoking. Among non-smoking adolescents; who have past smoking experience [odds ratio (OR) 2.73; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.92 - 3.88]; who have intentions of smoking when close friends offer a cigarette (OR 31.47; 95% CI = 21.50 - 46.05); and who have friends that are mostly smokers (OR 5.27; 95% CI = 2.85 - 9.74) are more likely to be smokers in the future. The prediction model developed from this study consists of five determinants; past smoking experience; parents smoking status; friends smoking status; ownership of a product with a cigarette brand logo; and intentions of smoking from close friends' cigarette offer. The area under the ROC curve was 0.8744 (95% CI=0.85 - 0.90) for current non-smokers. CONCLUSIONS: For efficiency, school-based smoking prevention programs need to be designed to target the high risk group exposed to future smoking through the prediction model developed by the study, instead of implementing the programs for all the students.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Electronic Cigarette Cessation in Youth and Young Adults: A Case Series
    Gautam Sikka, MopeninuJesu Oluyinka, Raiza Schreiber, Panagis Galiatsatos
    Tobacco Use Insights.2021; 14: 1179173X2110266.     CrossRef
  • A Comparative Analysis of Machine Learning Methods for Class Imbalance in a Smoking Cessation Intervention
    Khishigsuren Davagdorj, Jong Seol Lee, Van Huy Pham, Keun Ho Ryu
    Applied Sciences.2020; 10(9): 3307.     CrossRef
  • School-related factors affecting smoking intention among Korean middle school students
    Jin Suk Ra, Mi Sook Jung
    Applied Nursing Research.2018; 39: 34.     CrossRef
  • Subgrouping High School Students for Substance Abuse–Related Behaviors: A Latent Class Analysis
    Fariba Khayyati, Asghar Mohammadpoorasl, Hamid Allahverdipour, Mohammad AsghariJafarabadi, Kamiar Kouzekanani
    American Journal of Men's Health.2017; 11(4): 1200.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic Disparities in Smoking Behavior and Early Smoking Initiation Among Men in Malawi
    Sanni Yaya, Ghose Bishwajit, Vaibhav Shah, Michael Ekholuenetale
    Tobacco Use Insights.2017; 10: 1179173X1772629.     CrossRef
  • Association between Peer Cigarette Smoking and Electronic Cigarette Smoking among Adolescent Nonsmokers: A National Representative Survey
    Jun Hyun Hwang, Soon-Woo Park, Hajo Zeeb
    PLOS ONE.2016; 11(10): e0162557.     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated with Early Smoking Initiation among Korean Adolescents
    Eun Sun So, Ji Young Yeo
    Asian Nursing Research.2015; 9(2): 115.     CrossRef
  • Personality, Perceived Environment, and Behavior Systems Related to Future Smoking Intentions among Youths: An Application of Problem-Behavior Theory in Shanghai, China
    Yong Cai, Rui Li, Jingfen Zhu, Li Na, Yaping He, Pam Redmon, Yun Qiao, Jin Ma, Jacobus van Wouwe
    PLOS ONE.2015; 10(3): e0122276.     CrossRef
  • Risk Factors of Future Smoking Among Thai Youth
    Gyeongsil Lee, Joann Lee, Sungkyu Lee
    Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health.2015; 27(2): NP2602.     CrossRef
  • Influence of Experiences of Witnessing Tobacco Advertising and Preferences of Tobacco Companies' Social Responsibility on Current and Future Smoking Intentions in Adolescents
    Sung Rae Shin, Sun Hwa Shin, Bok Keun Lee, Jin Hee Yang
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2014; 25(1): 33.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and Factors Associated with Smoking Intentions among Non-smoking and Smoking Adolescents in Kota Tinggi, Johor, Malaysia
    Lim Kuang Hock, Sumarni Mohamad Ghazali, Kee Chee Cheong, Lim Kuang Kuay, Lim Hui Li, Teh Chien Huey, Chan Ying Ying, Yeo Lay Yen, Fiona Goh Swee Ching, Khoo Yi Yi, Chong Zhuo Lin, Normala Ibrahim, Amal Nasir Mustafa
    Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.2014; 15(10): 4359.     CrossRef
  • Influence of Smoker Image Perceived Cigarette Advertising on Intention of Adulthood Smoking Among Highschool Students
    Goo-Churl Jeong
    The Journal of the Korea Contents Association.2014; 14(12): 785.     CrossRef
  • Risk Factors for Smoking Behaviors Among Adolescents
    Sung Suk Chung, Kyoung Hwa Joung
    The Journal of School Nursing.2014; 30(4): 262.     CrossRef
  • Analysis of Smoking by South Korean Middle School Students: Shifting Preferences in Brand Choice and Rising Popularity of Marlboro Cigarettes
    Randy M. Page, Yarazeth Hernandez Romero
    International Quarterly of Community Health Education.2013; 33(3): 289.     CrossRef
  • Association between Exposures of Smoking Scenes in Movies and Smoking Behavior among Korean Adolescents
    김이경, 이향기, Sun Ha Jee, 이성규
    Health and Social Welfare Review.2013; 33(4): 497.     CrossRef
  • Cross‐Cultural Analysis of Cognitive Attributions of Smoking in Thai and South Korean Adolescents
    Randy M. Page, Sunhee Park, Jiraporn Suwanteerangkul, Hyunju Park, Maria Kemeny, Lynn Philips
    Journal of School Health.2012; 82(2): 57.     CrossRef
  • Smoking Trajectories among Koreans in Seoul and California: Exemplifying a Common Error in Age Parameterization
    Jon-Patrick Allem, John W. Ayers, Jennifer B. Unger, Veronica L. Irvin, C. Richard Hofstetter, Melbourne F. Hovell
    Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.2012; 13(5): 1851.     CrossRef
  • Preventable Lifestyle Risk Factors for Non-Communicable Diseases in the Pakistan Adolescents Schools Study 1 (PASS-1)
    Ali Khan Khuwaja, Saleem Khawaja, Komal Motwani, Adeel Akbar Khoja, Iqbal Syed Azam, Zafar Fatmi, Badar Sabir Ali, Muhammad Masood Kadir
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2011; 44(5): 210.     CrossRef
  • Current health issues in Korean adolescents
    Chang Ho Hong
    Korean Journal of Pediatrics.2011; 54(10): 395.     CrossRef
  • Public Health Challenges of Electronic Cigarettes in South Korea
    Sungkyu Lee, Heejin Kimm, Ji Eun Yun, Sun Ha Jee
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2011; 44(6): 235.     CrossRef
Medical Expenditure of National Health Insurance Attributable to Smoking among the Korean Population.
Sang Yi Lee, Sun Ha Jee, Ji Eun Yun, Su Young Kim, Jakyung Lee, Jonathan M Samet, Il Soon Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(3):227-232.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.3.227
  • 4,808 View
  • 46 Download
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this study was to determine the population-attributable risk (PAR) and estimate the total medical expenditure of the Korean National Health Insurance (KNHI) due to smoking. METHODS: We used data from the Korean Cancer Prevention Study of 1,178,138 Koreans aged 30 to 95. These data were available from 1992 to 2003 and covered a long-term follow-up period among the Korean population. RESULTS: The total medical expenditure of KNHI related to smoking increased by 27% from $324.9 million in 1999 to $413.7 million in 2003. By specific diseases, smokingattributable KNHI medical expenditure was the highest for lung cancer ($74.2 million), followed by stroke ($65.3 million), COPD ($50.1 million), CHD ($49 million) and stomach cancer ($30 million). A total of 1.3 million KNHI patients were suffering from smoking-related diseases in 2003. We predicted rises in total KNHI medical expenditure related to smoking to $675.1 million (63% increase compared with that of 2003) and in the total number of KNHI patients suffering from smoking-related diseases to about 2.6million (an approximate 100% increase compared with those in 2003) in 2015. CONCLUSIONS: We found a substantial economic burden related to the high smoking prevalence in South Korea.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Estimates of the Prevalence, Intensity and the Number of Workers Exposed to Cigarette Smoking across Occupations and Industries in Korea
    Hyejung Jung, Dong-Hee Koh, Sangjun Choi, Ju-Hyun Park, Hwan-Cheol Kim, Sang-Gil Lee, Donguk Park
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Positive Group Psychotherapy and Motivational Interviewing on Smoking Cessation
    Eun Jin Lee
    Journal of Addictions Nursing.2017; 28(2): 88.     CrossRef
  • Smoking and Oral Diseases
    Dal-Nim Yang, Yong-Duk Park
    Journal of the Korean Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.2015; 6(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • The association between inhaled long-acting bronchodilators and less in-hospital care in newly-diagnosed COPD patients
    Jinhee Kim, Kyungjoo Kim, Yuri Kim, Kwang-Ha Yoo, Chin Kook Lee, Hyoung Kyu Yoon, Young Sam Kim, Young Bum Park, Jin Hwa Lee, Yeon-Mok Oh, Sang-Do Lee, Sei Won Lee
    Respiratory Medicine.2014; 108(1): 153.     CrossRef
  • Predictors of success at six-month follow-up at a public smoking cessation clinic in South Korea
    Soo-Young Bhang, Sam-Wook Choi, Joon-Ho Ahn, Kunwoo Kim, Hano Kim, Hye-Kyeong Park
    Asia-Pacific Psychiatry.2013; 5(3): 197.     CrossRef
  • Cost and effectiveness of the nationwide government-supported Smoking Cessation Clinics in the Republic of Korea
    Jin-Kyoung Oh, Min Kyung Lim, E Hwa Yun, Sang Hwa Shin, Eun Young Park, Eun-Cheol Park
    Tobacco Control.2013; 22(e1): e73.     CrossRef
  • Health and Economic Burden of Major Cancers Due to Smoking in Korea
    In-Hwan Oh, Seok-Jun Yoon, Tai-Young Yoon, Joong-Myung Choi, Bong-Keun Choe, Eun-Jung Kim, Young-Ae Kim, Hye-Young Seo, Yoon-Hyung Park
    Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.2012; 13(4): 1525.     CrossRef
  • The influence of housing tenure and marital status on smoking in South Korea
    Seungji Lim, Woojin Chung, Hanjoong Kim, Sunmi Lee
    Health Policy.2010; 94(2): 101.     CrossRef
  • Factors influencing cigarette smoking and quantified implications for anti-smoking policy: evidence from South Korea
    Woojin Chung, Hanjoong Kim, Seungji Lim, Sunmi Lee, Kyungsook Cho
    International Journal of Public Health.2009; 54(6): 409.     CrossRef
The Change In Blood Pressure And Factors Affecting The Change In Blood Pressure For Korean Children: A Six-Year Follow-Up Study.
Il Suh, Soon Young Lee, Chung Mo Nam, Il Soon Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 1993;26(1):96-109.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
For the purposes of analyzing the distribution and the change in blood pressure according to age and determining the factors affecting the change in blood pressure, a follow-up study had been conducted for 6 years from 1986 to 1991 for 430 primary school children age 6 years old in 1986 in Kangwha County, Korea. The mean blood pressure increased according to age. Specifically mean systolic blood pressure increased from 97.3 mmHg for male and 96.4mmHg for female(at 6 years of age) to 108.8mmHg for male and 112.1mmHg for female(at 11 years of age). Mean diastolic blood pressure increased from 60.0mmHg for male and 61.8mmHg for female(at 6 years of age) to 72.9mmHg for male 73.8mmHg for female(at 11 years of age). The average annual increase in blood pressure was 2.3mmHg(in systolic blood pressure) and 2.4mmHg(in diastolic blood pressure) for female, respectively. To determine the factors affecting the change in blood pressure, the stepwise regression analysis was conducted. Children were divided into the three groups(low, middle, and upper) according to the level of systolic and diastolic blood pressure at the age of 6, and the regression analysis was performed in each group. For the change in systolic blood pressure, the changes in weight and skinfold thickness or initial skinfold thickness for male, and the change in weight for female were selected as significant factors for children in middle and upper group. For the change of blood pressure in diastolic blood pressure, no variables was significant.
Summary
The Change of Children's Blood Pressure and Factors Affecting the Level of Blood Pressure In Children.
Il Suh, Il Soon Kim, Chung Mo Nam, Soon Young Lee, Hee Chul Oh, Chun Bae Kim, Eun Cheol Park
Korean J Prev Med. 1989;22(3):303-312.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
To show the distribution and change of blood pressure according to age and find factors affecting the level of blood pressure in primary school children, a follow-up study was conducted from 1986 to 1989 on 401 first grade children attending primary school in Kangwha county in 1986 and their parents. The blood pressure of the children was significantly increased according to age. The average annual increase was 1.8mmHg in systolic blood pressure and 2.5mmHg in diastolic blood pressure. The level of blood pressure did not show any significant difference in both sexes. Among children who were at or above the 80th percentile of blood pressure in the first grade, 35 and 30% of them have remained at the same level of systolic and diastolic blood pressure respectively in the fourth grade. But we could not find any significance in the tracking of blood pressure of children who were at or above the 90th percentile of blood pressure in the first grade. Weight and pulse rate were shown to significant factors affecting systolic blood pressure in children of both sexes and mother's blood pressure and skinfolds thickness were also affected systolic blood pressure in girls. The variables significantly affecting diastolic blood pressure were arm circumference and pulse rate for boys and height and pulse rate for girls.
Summary
Study of Medical Carein Health Subcenter.
Moon Shik Kim, Han Joong Kim, Young Key Kim, Il Soon Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 1976;9(1):109-116.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Reorganization of myun health care service is one of the main issues in health care delivery in rural Korea. The fundamental, concept of the role and function of the myun health subcenter is that it is the basic unit of rural health care service and is to provide comprehensive health care service through the integration of curative and preventive services. The aim of this study is to analyze the patterns of curative activities in the myun health subcenter in terms of the most prevalent types of diseases, necessary diagnostic methods and required equipment, types of treatment, necessary drugs and materials, and finally the cost of curative services. The population on which this study was done was the 1596 patients who visited the two myun health subcenters (Sunwon Myun and Naega Myun) in Kang Hwa County, the area of the Yonsei University Community Health Teaching Project, during period from May 1, 1975 to June 10, 1976. For the patient's record in the clinic, problem oriented medical records were used. Decisions regarding the disease classification, the diagnostic methods used and selection of the most appropriate and adequate medical treatment were made by a group of three experienced physicians after reviewing the medical records which had been written by public physicians who were treating patients in the study area. The records were reviewed by resident staff members of the Department of Preventive Medicine, of Yonsei University College of Medicine. A brief summary of results of the study is as follow: 1. 29.9% of the patients who visited the clinics were ages between 0-4. No sex difference was observed among patients less than 20 years of age. However, among patients over 20 years old, females predominated. Thus it is evident that the majority of patients were either children or mothers and grandmothers. 2. The distance from the individual villages to the myun health subcenter was one of important factors in determining the ratio of clinic visits. However, other factors such as the activities of the health workers also affected the rates substantially. 3. The most common 25 diseases comprised 90.2% of all the diseases recorded. Acute respiratory infection (25.5), skin (12.7%), diarrheal diseases (6.8%), neuralgia and back pain (4.9%) and all other injuries (3.9%) were the five most common diseases. 4. Of all the diseases diagnosed and treated, 9.2% required simple laboratory tests for diagnosis, 6.5% required X-ray examination, and altogether 13.6% required either laboratory test of X-ray examination. 5. Treatment and management of 42.0% of the cases could be accomplished with simple, inexpensive drugs, 12.8% required the use of more expensive drugs (mostly antibiotics) and injections were required in 19.7% of the cases. Minor surgery and referral were necessary in 5% of the cases. 6. The cost for diagnosis and treatment was estimated with a standard which was set by general concensus. The average cost of diagnosis was 144 per case and the cost of treatment was 726 per case. The total average cost per visit was 870.
Summary
Recent Mortality Trends in Korea.
Il Soon Kim, Dong Woo Lee
Korean J Prev Med. 1969;2(1):61-76.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
A review has been made of mortality trends in Korea from 1958 to 1907 analyzing the data by sex, age and cause of death. The crude death rates and age specific death rates were estimate6 by the model of N. Keyfitz life table which had teen developed by the data of the 1960's national census. The cause specific death rates shown in this article are based on the following: all deaths occurring in the death-registration are expressed as a numberator, while the denominator was estimated from the regular national census data by interpolation method. It is estimated that only an average of about 40% of deaths which occurred during a year were registered during 1958 to 1967. The validity and the reliability of the diagnosis of causes of death seem to be extremely poor in this country. Therefore the cause specific death rates in this article are aimed to reveal trends of causes of registered death and not for the actual level of death rates. For 10 years very interesting mortality trends were observed : 1. The trend in the crude death rates was downward slowly. 2. The estimated death rate for the infant in 1960 was still high up to 100 per 1,000. 3. The rates for mortality attributed to such infectious diseases as pneumonia, bronchitis, gastroenteritis and measles decreased an average 40-60%. 4. The death rates for over-all tuberculosis decreased only 9.8%. 50% of the decrease was contributed by those in the less-than-15 year age group. 5. The death rates for chronic diseases, such as vascular diseases affecting the central nervous system, malignant neoplasm, major heart diseases and all accidents rose about 40-60%. 6. The rank order of the 10 leading causes of death showed large changes over the years, except for pneumonia and tuberculosis which occupyed 1st and End places respectively. Vascular diseases affecting the central nervous system moved from 5th to 3rd place and malignant neoplasm from 6th to 4th palace. The major heart diseases moved from 10th to 6th place and all accidents from 10th to 7th place. On the other hand, gastroenteritis moved from 3rd to 5th place and influenza from 4th to 8th place.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health