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Hye Jin Chi 2 Articles
Association Between Meat Consumption and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Korean Adults with Metabolic Syndrome.
Sun Min Oh, Hyeon Chang Kim, Song Vogue Ahn, Hye Jin Chi, Il Suh
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(6):486-495.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.6.486
  • 5,512 View
  • 78 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The effect of meat consumption on cardiometabolic risk has been continuously studied, but their associations are not conclusive. The aim of this study is to examine the association between the consumption of meat or red meat and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in healthy Korean adults. METHODS: This study evaluated 2374 community-dwelling adults (933 men and 1441 women) who were free of cardiovascular disease or cancer, living in a rural area in Korea. Total meat and red meat intakes were assessed with a validated 103 item-food frequency questionnaire. Carotid IMT was evaluated ultrasonographically, IMTmax was defined as the highest value among IMT of bilateral common carotid arteries. RESULTS: After adjustment for potential confounding factors, the mean IMTmax tended to increase in higher meat consumption groups in both men and women with metabolic syndrome (p for trend= 0.027 and 0.049, respectively), but not in participants without metabolic syndrome. Frequent meat consumption (> or =5 servings/week) was significantly associated with higher IMTmax in men with metabolic syndrome (by 0.08 mm, p=0.015). Whereas, the association was not significant in women (by 0.05 mm, p=0.115). Similar but attenuated findings were shown with red meat intake. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that a higher meat consumption may be associated with a higher carotid IMT in Korean adults with metabolic syndrome. The frequent meat consumption (> or =5 servings/week), compared with the others, was associated with a higher carotid IMTmax only in men with metabolic syndrome. Further research is required to explore optimal meat consumption in people with specific medical conditions.
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  • Intake of food rich in saturated fat in relation to subclinical atherosclerosis and potential modulating effects from single genetic variants
    Federica Laguzzi, Buamina Maitusong, Rona J. Strawbridge, Damiano Baldassarre, Fabrizio Veglia, Steve E. Humphries, Rainer Rauramaa, Sudhir Kurl, Andries J. Smit, Philippe Giral, Angela Silveira, Elena Tremoli, Anders Hamsten, Ulf de Faire, Bruna Gigante,
    Scientific Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Relationship Between Dietary Choices and Health and Premature Vascular Ageing
    Ioana Mozos, Daniela Jianu, Dana Stoian, Costin Mozos, Cristina Gug, Marius Pricop, Otilia Marginean, Constantin Tudor Luca
    Heart, Lung and Circulation.2021; 30(11): 1647.     CrossRef
  • Relation between the Total Diet Quality based on Korean Healthy Eating Index and the Incidence of Metabolic Syndrome Constituents and Metabolic Syndrome among a Prospective Cohort of Korean Adults
    Saerom Shin, Seungmin Lee
    Korean Journal of Community Nutrition.2020; 25(1): 61.     CrossRef
  • Association between Total Diet Quality and Metabolic Syndrome Incidence Risk in a Prospective Cohort of Korean Adults
    Saerom Shin, Seungmin Lee
    Clinical Nutrition Research.2019; 8(1): 46.     CrossRef
  • Red meat consumption and cardiovascular target organ damage (from the Strong Heart Study)
    Bernhard Haring, Wenyu Wang, Amanda Fretts, Daichi Shimbo, Elisa T. Lee, Barbara V. Howard, Mary J. Roman, Richard B. Devereux
    Journal of Hypertension.2017; 35(9): 1794.     CrossRef
  • The Strong Heart Study
    José R. Banegas, Fernando Rodríguez-Artalejo
    Journal of Hypertension.2017; 35(9): 1782.     CrossRef
  • Association between Nitrogen Stable Isotope Ratios in Human Hair and Serum Levels of Leptin
    Song Vogue Ahn, Sang-Baek Koh, Kwang-Sik Lee, Yeon-Sik Bong, Jong-Ku Park
    The Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine.2017; 243(2): 133.     CrossRef
  • The association between carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of human hair and metabolic syndrome
    Jong-Ku Park, Song Vogue Ahn, Mi Kyung Kim, Kwang-Sik Lee, Sang-Baek Koh, Yeon-Sik Bong
    Clinica Chimica Acta.2015; 450: 72.     CrossRef
  • Mediterranean diet and carotid atherosclerosis in the Northern Manhattan Study
    Hannah Gardener, Clinton B. Wright, Digna Cabral, Nikolaos Scarmeas, Yian Gu, Ken Cheung, Mitchell S.V. Elkind, Ralph L. Sacco, Tatjana Rundek
    Atherosclerosis.2014; 234(2): 303.     CrossRef
  • Association Between Serum Uric Acid Level and Metabolic Syndrome
    Ju-Mi Lee, Hyeon Chang Kim, Hye Min Cho, Sun Min Oh, Dong Phil Choi, Il Suh
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2012; 45(3): 181.     CrossRef
Mathematical Modeling of the Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus and Evaluation of the Epidemic Response Strategies in the Republic of Korea.
Mina Suh, Jeehyun Lee, Hye Jin Chi, Young Keun Kim, Dae Yong Kang, Nam Wook Hur, Kyung Hwa Ha, Dong Han Lee, Chang Soo Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(2):109-116.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.2.109
  • 15,476 View
  • 216 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The pandemic of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus has required decision-makers to act in the face of the substantial uncertainties. In this study, we evaluated the potential impact of the pandemic response strategies in the Republic of Korea using a mathematical model. METHODS: We developed a deterministic model of a pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in a structured population using the demographic data from the Korean population and the epidemiological feature of the pandemic (H1N1) 2009. To estimate the parameter values for the deterministic model, we used the available data from the previous studies on pandemic influenza. The pandemic response strategies of the Republic of Korea for novel influenza A (H1N1) virus such as school closure, mass vaccination (70% of population in 30 days), and a policy for anti-viral drug (treatment or prophylaxis) were applied to the deterministic model. RESULTS: The effect of two-week school closure on the attack rate was low regardless of the timing of the intervention. The earlier vaccination showed the effect of greater delays in reaching the peak of outbreaks. When it was no vaccination, vaccination at initiation of outbreak, vaccination 90 days after the initiation of outbreak and vaccination at the epidemic peak point, the total number of clinical cases for 400 days were 20.8 million, 4.4 million, 4.7 million and 12.6 million, respectively. The pandemic response strategies of the Republic of Korea delayed the peak of outbreaks (about 40 days) and decreased the number of cumulative clinical cases (8 million). CONCLUSIONS: Rapid vaccination was the most important factor to control the spread of pandemic influenza, and the response strategies of the Republic of Korea were shown to delay the spread of pandemic influenza in this deterministic model.
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Citations

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  • Estimation of optimal antiviral stockpile for a novel influenza pandemic
    Soyoung Kim, Yu Bin Seo, Jacob Lee, Yang Soo Kim, Eunok Jung
    Journal of Infection and Public Health.2022; 15(7): 720.     CrossRef
  • Projections for novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and evaluation of epidemic response strategies for India
    Seema Patrikar, Deepti Poojary, D.R. Basannar, D.S. Faujdar, Renuka Kunte
    Medical Journal Armed Forces India.2020; 76(3): 268.     CrossRef
  • Prediction of the Transition From Subexponential to the Exponential Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in Chennai, India: Epidemic Nowcasting
    Kamalanand Krishnamurthy, Bakiya Ambikapathy, Ashwani Kumar, Lourduraj De Britto
    JMIR Public Health and Surveillance.2020; 6(3): e21152.     CrossRef
  • Mathematical model of transmission dynamics and optimal control strategies for 2009 A/H1N1 influenza in the Republic of Korea
    Soyoung Kim, Jonggul Lee, Eunok Jung
    Journal of Theoretical Biology.2017; 412: 74.     CrossRef
  • A real option analysis for stochastic disease control and vaccine stockpile policy: An application to H1N1 in Korea
    Hojeong Park
    Economic Modelling.2016; 53: 187.     CrossRef
  • Stochastic methods for epidemic models: An application to the 2009 H1N1 influenza outbreak in Korea
    Hyojung Lee, Sunmi Lee, Chang Hyeong Lee
    Applied Mathematics and Computation.2016; 286: 232.     CrossRef
  • Schools’ Response to MERS(MERS-CoV) Outbreak: Schools’ Discretionary Response in Absence of Control Tower
    In Sook Lee, Jae Hee Yoon, Eun Joo Hong, Chae Yoon Kim
    Journal of the Korean Society of School Health.2015; 28(3): 188.     CrossRef
  • The Effects of School Closures on Influenza Outbreaks and Pandemics: Systematic Review of Simulation Studies
    Charlotte Jackson, Punam Mangtani, Jeremy Hawker, Babatunde Olowokure, Emilia Vynnycky, Gerardo Chowell
    PLoS ONE.2014; 9(5): e97297.     CrossRef
  • Uncertainty Quantification in Simulations of Epidemics Using Polynomial Chaos
    F. Santonja, B. Chen-Charpentier
    Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine.2012; 2012: 1.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics of Outpatients with Pandemic H1N1/09 Influenza in a Tertiary Care University Hospital in Korea
    Kyung Sun Park, Tae Sung Park, Jin Tae Suh, You Sun Nam, Mi Suk Lee, Hee Joo Lee
    Yonsei Medical Journal.2012; 53(1): 213.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological Characteristics of Imported Influenza A (H1N1) Cases during the 2009 Pandemic in Korea
    Jun Kil Choi, Sang Won Lee, Bo Youl Choi
    Epidemiology and Health.2012; 34: e2012009.     CrossRef

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health