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Hwa Sung Kim 4 Articles
The effect of smoking and drinking habit on the health status of lead workers.
Choong Koo Lee, Yong Bae Kim, Gap Soo Lee, Kyu Yoon Hwang, Hwa Sung Kim, Sung Soo Lee, Kyu Dong Ahn, Byung Kook Lee
Korean J Prev Med. 1998;31(4):708-718.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
To investigate the effect of smoking and drinking habit on the health status in lead using industries, 2,785 male workers in lead using industries (7 storage battery industries, 7 secondary smelting and related industries, and 4 primary metal and other manufacturing industries) were selected for this study. This study was carried out as a part of periodic health examination. Selected study variables were zinc protoporphyrin in whole blood (ZPP), SGOT and SGPT for laboratory test. Questionnaire for lead related symptoms and smoking and drinking habit was provided to all the workers and filled up by themselves and reconfirmed by physician. The results obtained were as follows; 1. The overall smoking and drinking rate of study population were 69.8% and 73.6%, respectively. While the smoking and drinking rate of storage battery workers were 68.8% and 72.3%, those of secondary smelting industries and other industries were 66.0% and 66.4% and 74.6 and 80.3% respectively. 2. While the mean values of blood ZPP of lead exposed workers were significantly higher than other group, those of SGOT of storage battery workers were significant higher than other worker. But there were no differences of mean values of other variables. 3. Smoking habit did not affect on the mean value of blood ZPP of workers in special health examination group, but there were significant differences of blood ZPP and SGOT between drinker and non-drinker. 4. Symptom prevalence of lead exposure were higher in drinking and smoking group than non-drinking and non-smoking group. 5. In multiple regression analysis of the total lead related symptoms, blood ZPP, SGOT, and SGPT as dependent variable, respectively, and age, work duration, blood ZPP, pack year and amount of alcohol drinking as independent variables, work duration, pack year, amount of alcohol drinking, age contributed to total symptoms; and age, work duration, pack year contributed to blood ZPP; and age, amount of alcohol drinking, work duration contributed to SGOT; and pack year contributed to SGPT.
Summary
Follow-up Management State of Lead Battery Workers in Periodic Health Examination.
Gap Soo Lee, Young Hwangbo, Yong Bae Kim, Hwa Sung Kim, Jung Oh Ham, Sung Soo Lee, Kyu Dong Ahn, Byung Kook Lee, Jung Hur
Korean J Prev Med. 1996;29(4):733-746.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
To evaluate the follow-up management state and related factor of lead battery workers in periodic health examination as part of program of group occupational health service, author studied 293 workers with questionnaire on knowledge of results and follow-up management state and related factors, and compared the responses to their periodic health examination result charts. The results were as follows: 1. 252(86%) workers responsed that they had received the health examination result chart, but only 116(39.6%) workers responsed that they had been educated or explained about the result of health examination, and 11(57.9%) workers among 19 workers with non-occupational disease D, 101(44.3%) workers among 228 workers with non-occupational disease C, and 19(28.4%) workers among 67 workers with occupational disease C knew accurately their health examination results. 2. 78(24.8%) of the workers responsed that they had follow-up management, and contents of follow-up management were follow-up(36.6%), out-patient treatment(31%), change worksite(8.5%), temporary retirement(7.0%) and others(16.9%). 3. Most of the workers responsed that the health examination were necessary, but three-fourths of the workers responsed that the health examination had been superficial or that they didn't know. 4. In this study, follow-up management show significant association with only explanation or education about health examination result chart.
Summary
A Study on Urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase Activities of Office Workers in a Certain Industrial Complex Area.
Hwa Sung Kim, Gap Soo Lee, Sung Soo Lee, Kyu Dong Ahn, Byung Kook Lee
Korean J Prev Med. 1994;27(3):547-556.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
In order to identify the necessary information of biochemical indices for renal effect of lead for the early detection in medical surveillance of lead worker, the reference values of urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase(NAG) activities were studied with 205 office workers in one industrial complex area who were not exposed to lead occupationally. While study variables selected for lead exposure were blood lead (pbB), blood zinc protoporphyrin(ZPP) and delta-aminolevulinic acid (DALA) in urine, those for renal effect were urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase(NAG), blood urea nitrogen(BUN), serum creatinine(cr), serum uric acid (Ua), and urinary total protein (U-Tp). The results obtained were as follows: 1. The mean values of blood lead, ZPP and DALA in all subjects were 14.39+/-4.02 microgram/dl, 21.61+/-8.00 microgram/dl, and 2.73+/-0.90 microgram/l respectively. 2. The mean value of urinary NAG activities in all subjects was 3.51+/-2.01 U/l. The mean value of urinary NAG activities, which calculated from NAG activities divided by urinary creatinine concentration (CNAG), was 5.42+/-5.53 U/g creatinine and logarithmic normal distributed. 3. The reference value of urinary NAG activity was 12.06 U/g creatinine (95% CI=10.57-14.76U/g creatinine). 4. Logarithmic CNAG(r=0.781 P<0.01), U-TP(r=0.670 p<0.01) and ZPP (r=0.172 p<0.05)showed statistically significant correlation with CNAG.
Summary
Prevalence rate of lead related subjective symptoms in lead workers.
Du Shin Jeong, Hwa Sung Kim, Kyu Dong Ahn, Byung Kook Lee
Korean J Prev Med. 1993;26(2):251-267.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
The relationship between lead related subject symptoms and lead exposure indices was studied in 435 male lead workers in thirteen lead using industries. 212 male office workers who were not exposed to lead occupationally were also studied as a control group. Fourteen lead related symptoms were selected. They were further subdivided into 4 sub-symptom groups such as 1) gastrointestinal, 2) neuromuscular and joint 3) constitutional, and 4) psychological symptoms. Symptom questionnaires were provided to the workers and filled up by themselves and reconfirmed by interviewer(doctor). The test used for the evaluation of lead exposure were blood lead (PbB), zinc protoporphyrin in whole blood(ZPP), hemoglobin(Hb), hematocrit(Hct), delta-aminolevulinic acid in urine(DALA). The results obtained were as follows; 1. The higher prevalence rate in the sub-group of neuromuscular and joint symptoms was observed in occupationally lead exposed subjects than non-exposed subjects. Among the sub-groups, the most frequent symptom was "numbness of finger, hands of feet", and the prevalence of the symptom of "arthralgia", "weakness of fingers, hands or feet" and "myalgia" were higher in order. 2. While the symptom which showed the biggest difference of prevalence rate among the 14 symptoms between exposed and non-exposed subjects was "numbness of fingers, hands or feet" , the symptom which showed the highest prevalence rate was "feeling tired generally" in exposed and non-exposed subjects, but no statistical difference of symptom prevalence were observed. 3. In total study population, PbB and ZPP had dose-response relationship with 4 symptoms of neuromuscular and joint symptoms ("numbness of finger, hands or feet", "arthralgia", "weakness of fingers, hands or feet" and "myalgia") and one symptom of gastrointestinal group("intermittent pains in lower abdomen"). 4. In lead exposed workers, only neuromuscular and joint symptoms group showed dose-response relationship with PbB and ZPP. 5. In lead exposed workers, the prevalence rate of overall symptoms of lead workers with age below 39 years was higher than that of lead workers with age above 40. While neuromuscular and joint symptoms group had a dose-response relationship with PbB in former group, it had a dose-response relationship with ZPP in latter group. 6. Age adjusted odds ratios of symptoms of non-exposed with exposed and odds ratios of low exposed with high exposed workers showed the dose-response relationship of lead exposure with neuromuscular and joint symptoms group("numbness of fingers, hands or feet", "arthralgia", "weakness of fingers, hands or feet" and "myalgia") and gastrointestinal symptoms group("intermittent pains in lower abdoman").
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health