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Dong Han Lee 6 Articles
Mathematical Modeling of the Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus and Evaluation of the Epidemic Response Strategies in the Republic of Korea.
Mina Suh, Jeehyun Lee, Hye Jin Chi, Young Keun Kim, Dae Yong Kang, Nam Wook Hur, Kyung Hwa Ha, Dong Han Lee, Chang Soo Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(2):109-116.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.2.109
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  • 225 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The pandemic of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus has required decision-makers to act in the face of the substantial uncertainties. In this study, we evaluated the potential impact of the pandemic response strategies in the Republic of Korea using a mathematical model. METHODS: We developed a deterministic model of a pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in a structured population using the demographic data from the Korean population and the epidemiological feature of the pandemic (H1N1) 2009. To estimate the parameter values for the deterministic model, we used the available data from the previous studies on pandemic influenza. The pandemic response strategies of the Republic of Korea for novel influenza A (H1N1) virus such as school closure, mass vaccination (70% of population in 30 days), and a policy for anti-viral drug (treatment or prophylaxis) were applied to the deterministic model. RESULTS: The effect of two-week school closure on the attack rate was low regardless of the timing of the intervention. The earlier vaccination showed the effect of greater delays in reaching the peak of outbreaks. When it was no vaccination, vaccination at initiation of outbreak, vaccination 90 days after the initiation of outbreak and vaccination at the epidemic peak point, the total number of clinical cases for 400 days were 20.8 million, 4.4 million, 4.7 million and 12.6 million, respectively. The pandemic response strategies of the Republic of Korea delayed the peak of outbreaks (about 40 days) and decreased the number of cumulative clinical cases (8 million). CONCLUSIONS: Rapid vaccination was the most important factor to control the spread of pandemic influenza, and the response strategies of the Republic of Korea were shown to delay the spread of pandemic influenza in this deterministic model.
Summary

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Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Estimation of optimal antiviral stockpile for a novel influenza pandemic
    Soyoung Kim, Yu Bin Seo, Jacob Lee, Yang Soo Kim, Eunok Jung
    Journal of Infection and Public Health.2022; 15(7): 720.     CrossRef
  • Projections for novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and evaluation of epidemic response strategies for India
    Seema Patrikar, Deepti Poojary, D.R. Basannar, D.S. Faujdar, Renuka Kunte
    Medical Journal Armed Forces India.2020; 76(3): 268.     CrossRef
  • Prediction of the Transition From Subexponential to the Exponential Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in Chennai, India: Epidemic Nowcasting
    Kamalanand Krishnamurthy, Bakiya Ambikapathy, Ashwani Kumar, Lourduraj De Britto
    JMIR Public Health and Surveillance.2020; 6(3): e21152.     CrossRef
  • Mathematical model of transmission dynamics and optimal control strategies for 2009 A/H1N1 influenza in the Republic of Korea
    Soyoung Kim, Jonggul Lee, Eunok Jung
    Journal of Theoretical Biology.2017; 412: 74.     CrossRef
  • A real option analysis for stochastic disease control and vaccine stockpile policy: An application to H1N1 in Korea
    Hojeong Park
    Economic Modelling.2016; 53: 187.     CrossRef
  • Stochastic methods for epidemic models: An application to the 2009 H1N1 influenza outbreak in Korea
    Hyojung Lee, Sunmi Lee, Chang Hyeong Lee
    Applied Mathematics and Computation.2016; 286: 232.     CrossRef
  • Schools’ Response to MERS(MERS-CoV) Outbreak: Schools’ Discretionary Response in Absence of Control Tower
    In Sook Lee, Jae Hee Yoon, Eun Joo Hong, Chae Yoon Kim
    Journal of the Korean Society of School Health.2015; 28(3): 188.     CrossRef
  • The Effects of School Closures on Influenza Outbreaks and Pandemics: Systematic Review of Simulation Studies
    Charlotte Jackson, Punam Mangtani, Jeremy Hawker, Babatunde Olowokure, Emilia Vynnycky, Gerardo Chowell
    PLoS ONE.2014; 9(5): e97297.     CrossRef
  • Uncertainty Quantification in Simulations of Epidemics Using Polynomial Chaos
    F. Santonja, B. Chen-Charpentier
    Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine.2012; 2012: 1.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics of Outpatients with Pandemic H1N1/09 Influenza in a Tertiary Care University Hospital in Korea
    Kyung Sun Park, Tae Sung Park, Jin Tae Suh, You Sun Nam, Mi Suk Lee, Hee Joo Lee
    Yonsei Medical Journal.2012; 53(1): 213.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological Characteristics of Imported Influenza A (H1N1) Cases during the 2009 Pandemic in Korea
    Jun Kil Choi, Sang Won Lee, Bo Youl Choi
    Epidemiology and Health.2012; 34: e2012009.     CrossRef
National Level Response to Pandemic (H1N1) 2009.
Dong Han Lee, Sang Sook Shin, Byung Yool Jun, Jong Koo Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(2):99-104.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.2.99
  • 5,978 View
  • 123 Download
  • 29 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The World Health Organization (WHO) announced the emergence of a novel influenza on April 24, 2009, and they declared pandemic on June 11. In Korea, the proportion of influenza-like illness and the consumption of antiviral agents peaked in early November. The government established the Central Headquarters for Influenza Control and operated the emergency response system. In the quarantine stations, we checked the body temperature and collected quarantine questionnaires from all the arrivals from infected countries. We also isolated the confirmed cases in the national isolation hospitals. However, as the community outbreaks were reported, we changed strategy from containment to mitigation. We changed the antiviral agent prescription guideline so that doctors could prescribe antiviral agents to all patients with acute febrile respiratory illness, without a laboratory diagnosis. Also the 470 designated hospitals were activated to enhance the efficacy of treatment. We vaccinated about 12 million people and manage the adverse event following the immunization management system. In 2010, we will establish additional national isolation wards and support hospitals to establish fever clinics and isolation intensive care unit (ICU) beds. We will also make a computer program for managing the national isolation hospitals and designated hospitals. We will establish isolation rooms and expand the laboratory in quarantine stations and we will construct a bio-safety level 3 laboratory in each province. In addition, we plan to construct a bio-safety level 4 laboratory at a new Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) facilities in Ossong.
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Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Unintended health benefits of adopting preventive behaviors during a virus outbreak
    Sok Chul Hong, Eunju Lee, Seojung Oh
    Health Economics.2023; 32(2): 324.     CrossRef
  • Core policies disparity response to COVID-19 among BRICS countries
    Jun Jiao, Leiyu Shi, Yuyao Zhang, Haiqian Chen, Xiaohan Wang, Manfei Yang, Junyan Yang, Meiheng Liu, Gang Sun
    International Journal for Equity in Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Management of the COVID-19 Pandemic in the Republic of Korea from the Perspective of Governance and Public-Private Partnership
    Woojin Kim, Tae Yong Jung, Susann Roth, Woochong Um, Changsoo Kim
    Yonsei Medical Journal.2021; 62(9): 777.     CrossRef
  • Factors Influencing the COVID-19 Vaccination Intentions in Nurses: Korea, February 2021
    Ju Young Park, Jiyeon Ha
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing.2021; 51(5): 537.     CrossRef
  • Acts and Public Notices on Healthcare-associated Infection Control & Prevention in the Republic of Korea
    Mijin Lee, Sumin Kim, Su Ha Han, Young Hwa Choi
    Korean Journal of Healthcare-Associated Infection Control and Prevention.2021; 26(2): 57.     CrossRef
  • Vaccine-related Anaphylaxis Cases Confirmed by KCDC from 2001-2016
    Eui jeong Roh, Mi-Hee Lee, Kun-Baek Song, Yeon Kyeong Lee, Min-Kyung Kim, Tae Eun Kim, Eun Hee Chung
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Antiviral treatment of influenza in South Korea
    Young June Choe, Hyunju Lee, Hoan Jong Lee, Eun Hwa Choi
    Expert Review of Anti-infective Therapy.2015; 13(6): 741.     CrossRef
  • Antiviral therapy in seasonal influenza and 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza: Korean experiences and perspectives
    Joon Young Song, Ji Yun Noh, Won Suk Choi, Hee Jin Cheong, Woo Joo Kim
    Expert Review of Anti-infective Therapy.2015; 13(11): 1361.     CrossRef
  • Central government reform to improve national disease control
    Eun-Cheol Park
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2015; 58(8): 714.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge and Compliance with Prevention of Respiratory Tract Infection Among Workers in Geriatric Facilities
    Og Son Kim
    Korean Journal of Nosocomial Infection Control.2015; 20(2): 61.     CrossRef
  • Assessment of the Intensive Countermeasures in the 2009 Pandemic Influenza in Korea
    Jin Hyuk Choi, Yunhwan Kim, Seoyun Choe, Sunmi Lee
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2014; 5(2): 101.     CrossRef
  • Related Factors of Handwashing with Soap and its Practices by Students in South Korea
    Nam Young Yang, Moo-Sik Lee, Hae-Jung Hwang, Jee-Young Hong, Byung-Hee Kim, Hyun-Soo Kim, Su-Jin Hong, Eun-Young Kim, Young-Teak Kim, Yun-Jin Park
    Journal of Korean Public Health Nursing.2014; 28(2): 372.     CrossRef
  • Allergic reactions to vaccine components
    Hyeon-Jong Yang
    Allergy, Asthma & Respiratory Disease.2014; 2(3): 157.     CrossRef
  • Responsiveness of Public Health Center and Its Related Factors against H1N1 Epidemic
    Jung Lang Jang, Keon Yeop Kim, Nam Soo Hong, Sin Kam, Won Kee Lee, Yu Mi Lee
    Health Policy and Management.2013; 23(1): 52.     CrossRef
  • Steroid Effect for Persistent Cough Developed after 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Infection: 5 Cases
    Seung-Joon Lee, Jun Yeon Won
    Korean Journal of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.2013; 56(7): 452.     CrossRef
  • Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Responses in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients
    Ji Hun Kim, Han Na Choi, Si Hye Kim, Hwajeong Lee, Sung-Hoon Park, Seong-Kyu Kim, Jung-Yoon Choe, Hyun-Hee Kwon, Hee-Jin Cheong
    Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.2013; 20(2): 87.     CrossRef
  • Was Mandatory Quarantine Necessary in China for Controlling the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic?
    Xinhai Li, Wenjun Geng, Huidong Tian, Dejian Lai
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2013; 10(10): 4690.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic Burden of Influenza in the Republic of Korea, 2007–2010
    Mina Suh, Dae Ryong Kang, Dong Han Lee, Yoon Jung Choi, Byongho Tchoe, Chung Mo Nam, Hyung Jung Kim, Jong Koo Lee, Byung Yool Jun, Yoosik Youm, Gwi-Nam Bae, Tae Yong Lee, Moon Shik Kim, Dong Chun Shin, Changsoo Kim, Steven J. Drews
    PLoS ONE.2013; 8(12): e84121.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Clinical Manifestation and Laboratory Findings between H1N1 and Influenza B Infection
    Su Hee Kim, Chul Hyue Park, Kyoung Huh, Gyu Hong Shim, Hyo-Bin Kim, Su Jeong You, Young Whan Song, Ju-Young Chung, Mi Jung Park, Chang-Keun Kim, Myoung Jae Chey, Ja Wook Koo, Sang Woo Kim
    Pediatric Allergy and Respiratory Disease.2012; 22(1): 64.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics of Outpatients with Pandemic H1N1/09 Influenza in a Tertiary Care University Hospital in Korea
    Kyung Sun Park, Tae Sung Park, Jin Tae Suh, You Sun Nam, Mi Suk Lee, Hee Joo Lee
    Yonsei Medical Journal.2012; 53(1): 213.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics of Hospitalized Children with 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1): A Multicenter Study in Korea
    Jeong Hee Ko, Ji Hye Kim, Jin Han Kang, Jong-Hyun Kim, Byung Wook Eun, Kyung Hyo Kim, Jung Youn Hong, Sung Hee Oh
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2012; 27(4): 408.     CrossRef
  • Usefulness of Influenza Rapid Antigen Test in Influenza A (H1N1)
    Byung-Kee Lee, Jung-Ki Ju, Bong-Seok Choi, Sang-Gun Jung, Jin-A Jung, Hyun-Jin Yun
    Pediatric Allergy and Respiratory Disease.2012; 22(1): 71.     CrossRef
  • The Association of Lymphopenia with the Clinical Severity in the Korean Children Admitted to the Hospital with Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Infection
    Jin-Kyong Chun, Byung Ho Cha, Young Uh, Hyo Youl Kim, Young Keun Kim, Woocheol Kwon, Hwang Min Kim
    Infection and Chemotherapy.2011; 43(1): 36.     CrossRef
  • Pandemic Influenza (H1N1 2009) among Pregnant Korean Women
    Baek-Nam Kim, Yee Gyung Kwak, Chi-Sook Moon, Yeon-Sook Kim, Eu Suk Kim, Kkot Sil Lee, Chang-Seop Lee, Ji-An Hur
    Infection & Chemotherapy.2011; 43(1): 55.     CrossRef
  • Status of and Factors Influencing Vaccination against the Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus among University Students from the Fields of Nursing and Allied Health
    Og Son Kim
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing.2011; 41(3): 403.     CrossRef
  • 2009 H1N1 influenza infection in Korean healthcare personnel
    J. S. Yeom, J.-H. Lee, I.-G. Bae, W.-S. Oh, C.-S. Moon, K.-H. Park, J.-H. Lee, E.-S. Kim, Y. G. Kwak, C.-S. Lee
    European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases.2011; 30(10): 1201.     CrossRef
  • Effect of the H1N1 Influenza Pandemic on the Incidence of Epidemic Keratoconjunctivitis and on Hygiene Behavior: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Hyun Su Kim, Ho Chun Choi, Belong Cho, Joon Yong Lee, Min Jeong Kwon, Abdisalan Mohamed Noor
    PLoS ONE.2011; 6(8): e23444.     CrossRef
  • Impact of Dialysis Modality on the Incidence of 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Influenza in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients
    Jang-Hee Cho, Jun-Young Do, Sung-Ho Kim, Jong-Yeon Kim, Jung-Ju Seo, Ji-Young Choi, Sun-Hee Park, Chan-Duck Kim, Sun-Young Jung, Kyu-Hyang Cho, Jong-Won Park, Duk-Hyun Lee, Kyung Eun Song, Yong-Lim Kim
    Peritoneal Dialysis International: Journal of the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.2011; 31(3): 347.     CrossRef
  • Trend in Age Distribution of Visitors to Flu-Clinics during the Pandemic Influenza (H1N1 2009)
    Baek-Nam Kim, Yee Gyung Kwak, Chi-Sook Moon, Yeon-Sook Kim, Eu Suk Kim, In-Gyu Bae, Joon-Sup Yeom, Chang-Seop Lee, Ji-An Hur
    Infection and Chemotherapy.2009; 42(2): 90.     CrossRef
Mumps Transmission Control Status and Inapparent Infection Rate among Middle and High School Students during the 2007-2008 Mumps Outbreak in Daegu.
Kyo Hyun Kim, Chang Hwi Kim, Bo Youl Choi, Un Yeong Go, Dong Han Lee, Moran Ki
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(6):408-415.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.6.408
  • 5,149 View
  • 47 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was performed to investigate the mumps transmission control status and inapparent infection rate among middle and high school students in Daegu City during a mumps outbreak. METHODS: Nine schools (two middle schools and seven high schools), which reported a number of mumps cases between 2007 and 2008 were selected for investigation. During March-May 2008, a standard questionnaire was distributed to gather information about case identification, instructed isolation measure, isolation status of mumps cases and related factors, and outdoor activities of non-isolated mumps case. Inapparent infection rate was estimated by serum mumps IgM and IgG antibodies status and self-reported mumps symptoms in three of the nine schools. RESULTS: Among 2,560 respondents, more than half of students answered that they did not receive instructions in mumps transmission control measures during the outbreak. Among the 327 mumps cases identified by the questionnaire, 131 cases (40.1%) were considered as isolated and the isolation rates were significantly different among schools, grades, and gender. Of the non-isolated cases, 88.3% continued attending school. Inapparent mumps infection rates were between 56.3% and 70.2%. CONCLUSIONS: Mumps transmission control was inadequate to control the mumps outbreak. Although high inapparent infection rate would mitigate the transmission control effect of case isolation, this measure is fundamental for infection control. The reasons of this inadequate status need to be explored to develop an effective intervention strategy.
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  • A Case of Idiopathic Orbital Inflammation With Elevated Anti-Mumps Immunoglobulin M Antibody
    Jiyeon Han, Kyung In Woo
    Ophthalmic Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery.2024; 40(3): e86.     CrossRef
  • Trend of measles, mumps, and rubella incidence following the measles‐rubella catch up vaccination in the Republic of Korea, 2001
    Young June Choe, Hye‐Eun Eom, Sung‐Il Cho
    Journal of Medical Virology.2017; 89(9): 1528.     CrossRef
  • Resurgence of Mumps in Korea
    Sun Hee Park
    Infection & Chemotherapy.2015; 47(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • An Outbreak of Mumps in a High School, Seoul, 2013
    Ha Ra Kang, Sung Yoon Kim, Hyo Hyun Cha, Young Min An, In Ah Park, Hae Ji Kang, Byung Wook Eun
    Pediatric Infection & Vaccine.2015; 22(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Reappraisal of MMR vaccines currently used in Korea
    Hyunju Lee, Han Wool Kim, Hye Kyung Cho, Eun Ae Park, Kyong Min Choi, Kyung‐Hyo Kim
    Pediatrics International.2011; 53(3): 374.     CrossRef
Epidemiological Investigation of a Measles Outbreak in a Preschool in Incheon, Korea, 2006.
Jae Sung So, Un Yeong Go, Dong Han Lee, Koang Suk Park, Jong Koo Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(3):153-158.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.3.153
  • 5,081 View
  • 62 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study describes a plan that was designed to prevent a measles outbreak that showed a changed outbreak pattern. This study is based on the epidemiological investigation of a measles outbreak in a preschool in Incheon, Korea, 2006. METHODS: The subjects were 152 students at a preschool where a measles outbreak occurred. A questionnaire survey was conducted and serological testing for measlesspecific IgM was preformed. RESULTS: Of the fifteen confirmed, identified cases, eleven patients had been vaccinated with one dose, one patient had received two doses and three patients were unvaccinated. The three unvaccinated cases consisted of one 5-year-old child, one 3-year-old child and one 16-month-old infant. For the cases with one dose of the vaccination, there were 11 cases, which consisted of six 5-year-old children, two 4-year-old children, two 3-year-old children and one 2-year-old child. The case with two doses of the vaccination was one 4-year-old child. The attack rate of measles was 100% in the 0-dose group, 11.2% in the 1-dose group and 2.0% in the 2-dose group. The vaccine's efficacy was 88.8% in the 1-dose group and 98.0% in the 2-dose group. The vaccine effectiveness for the 2-dose group was higher than that of the 1-dose group. CONCLUSIONS: High coverage with a 2-dose vaccination should be maintained, and the vaccination should be given at the suitable time to prevent a measles outbreak with a changed outbreak pattern.
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Citations

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  • Vaccines for measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella in children
    Carlo Di Pietrantonj, Alessandro Rivetti, Pasquale Marchione, Maria Grazia Debalini, Vittorio Demicheli
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Vaccines for measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella in children
    Carlo Di Pietrantonj, Alessandro Rivetti, Pasquale Marchione, Maria Grazia Debalini, Vittorio Demicheli
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Measles Elimination Activities in the Western Pacific Region: Experience from the Republic of Korea
    Young June Choe, Youngmee Jee, Myoung-don Oh, Jong-Koo Lee
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2015; 30(Suppl 2): S115.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological Investigation of a Measles Outbreak in Seoul, 2013~2014
    Heejin Ham, Jungim Jang, Changho Han
    Journal of Bacteriology and Virology.2015; 45(4): 372.     CrossRef
  • Vaccines for measles, mumps and rubella in children
    Vittorio Demicheli, Alessandro Rivetti, Maria Grazia Debalini, Carlo Di Pietrantonj
    Evidence-Based Child Health: A Cochrane Review Journal.2013; 8(6): 2076.     CrossRef
  • Reemergence of Measles in South Korea: Implications for Immunization and Surveillance Programs
    Young-Joon Park, Hye Suk Eom, Eun Seong Kim, Young June Choe, Geun-Ryang Bae, Duk-Hyoung Lee
    Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases.2013; 66(1): 6.     CrossRef
  • Assessment of Serologic Immunity to Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis After Treatment of Korean Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Patients
    Hyo Jin Kwon, Jae-Wook Lee, Nak-Gyun Chung, Bin Cho, Hack-Ki Kim, Jin Han Kang
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2012; 27(1): 78.     CrossRef
  • Current status of measles in the Republic of Korea: an overview of case-based and seroepidemiological surveillance scheme
    Young June Choe, Geun-Ryang Bae
    Korean Journal of Pediatrics.2012; 55(12): 455.     CrossRef
  • Seroprevalence of measles among children affected by national measles elimination program in Korea, 2010
    Eun Seong Kim, Young June Choe, Heeyeon Cho, You-Jin Kim, Hee Sook Yoon, Jeong-Sun Yang, Kisoon Kim, Geun-Ryang Bae, Duk-hyoung Lee
    Vaccine.2012; 30(23): 3355.     CrossRef
  • Vaccines for measles, mumps and rubella in children
    Vittorio Demicheli, Alessandro Rivetti, Maria Grazia Debalini, Carlo Di Pietrantonj
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2012;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of an Expanded Case Definition for Vaccine-Modified Measles in a School Outbreak in South Korea in 2010
    Young June Choe, Jae Kyung Hu, Kyung Min Song, Heeyeon Cho, Hee Sook Yoon, Seung Tae Kim, Han Jung Lee, Kisoon Kim, Geun-Ryang Bae, Jong-Koo Lee
    Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases.2012; 65(5): 371.     CrossRef
Factors Associated with Hypertension Control and Antihypertensive Medication among Hypertensive Patients in a Community.
Dong Han Lee, Youn Hee Choi, Kang Hee Lee, Dae Ryong Kang, Sun Ha Jee, Chung Mo Nam, Il Suh
Korean J Prev Med. 2003;36(3):289-297.
  • 4,640 View
  • 56 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The main objectives of this study are to identify the factors associated with hypertension control and to determine the influencing factors associated with antihypertensive therapy. METHODS: The study was conducted on 107 subjects who participated in the 1999 and 2002 Gwacheon Study and who had had uncontrolled hypertension (systolic > or=140 or diastolic > or= 90mmHg) in 1999. We compared the characteristics of the controlled and uncontrolled hypertensive group and investigated the characteristics of those taking antihypertensive medication. Univariate associations between hypertension control and its characteristics and the association between antihypertension treatment and its characteristics were tested with x2-test. We also performed logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: The participants who had their blood pressure checked within 6 months before their first measurement and those who had taken the antihypertensive medication showed significantly better hypertension control during the follow-up. The multivariate analysis showed that baseline antihypertensive therapy was the most important determinant factor of hypertension control during the follow-up. Socioeconomic level and life style did not affect hypertension control when controlled by the treatment variable in this study. The factors associated with antihypertensive therapy at follow-up were previous antihypertensive therapy, old age, and high educational level. CONCLUSIONS: Those who received antihypertensive therapy and those who had their blood pressure re-checked within 6 months both showed well controlled hypertension. The subjects with high educational level complied well with the antihypertensive regimen, but those in their forties did not.
Summary
Comparing Difference of Volume of Psychiatric Treatments between the Patient with Health Insurance and Those with Medical Assistance: For Inpatients of Korean Psychiatric Hospitals.
Dae Hee Lee, Eun Cheol Park, Chung Mo Nam, Sang Gyu Lee, Dong Han Lee, Seung Hum Yu
Korean J Prev Med. 2003;36(1):33-38.
  • 2,243 View
  • 28 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To assess the difference in the volume of psychiatric treatments provided to health insurance inpatients, compared with those on medical assistance (the medical aid program) Korean psychiatric hospitals, and to determine factors which affect the volume of the services. METHODS: 21 psychiatrists, from 3 Korean psychiatric hospitals recorded the frequencies psychiatric treatments provided to inpatients in one week (February18-24, 2002). The records of 329 patients were analyzed through t-tests, and random effectmixed model analyses to define the difference between the two groups, and to find other factors affecting the volume of service. RESULTS: A significant difference in the volume of psychiatric treatments provided was observed between the health insurance and medical assistance groups. The variation in the volume of service between hospitals was prominent, and other factors (gender, agegroup, length of stay and mental disorder) were also found to be significant. The patients on medical assistance received only 70% of the psychiatric treatments of those on health insurance. CONCLUSIONS: More effort is required to improve the methods of payment to increase the level of fee scheduling for medical assistance. Further studies on the mechanisms causing these differences in the volume of service are required.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health