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Akiko Kamimura 4 Articles
Peer Smoking and Smoking-related Beliefs Among College Students in Bangladesh
Akiko Kamimura, Zobayer Ahmmad, Mu Pye, Bethany Gull
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(1):51-58.   Published online January 22, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.146
  • 8,212 View
  • 234 Download
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Smoking is a significant public health issue in Bangladesh. The purpose of this study was to examine peer smoking and smoking-related beliefs among college students in Bangladesh.
Methods
College students at two universities in Dhaka, Bangladesh participated in a self-administered survey in May and June 2017.
Results
First, being a current or former smoker is associated with lower levels of beliefs among respondents that they would not smoke even with smoker friends or nervousness, and lower levels of intentions that they would not smoke, while current smokers and former smokers have different smoking-related beliefs. Second, having smoker friends is associated with lower levels of intentions that they would not smoke. Third, higher levels of normative beliefs that it is important not to smoke are associated with higher levels of beliefs that they would not smoke even with smoker friends or nervousness, higher levels of intentions that they would not smoke, and higher levels of avoidance of smoking.
Conclusions
Smoking-related beliefs and perceived norms in individuals’ social networks are important components in promoting tobacco cessation in Bangladesh. But it is challenging to prevent or intervene in smoking because of the high rates of smoking in this country and the high prevalence of smokers in individuals’ social networks. Future studies should examine the most effective interventions to combat smoking in high-smoking social networks, such as using mobile apps or social media, and evaluate the effectiveness of such interventions.
Summary

Citations

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  • Turkish Pediatrician Beliefs About Third-hand Smoking
    Fatma Sargin, Ebru Buldu
    Journal of Pediatric Health Care.2024; 38(1): 97.     CrossRef
  • Exploring the impact of smoking on mental health: A cross-sectional analysis in a district-level university in Bangladesh
    Md. Ahsan Habib, Md. Sagor Islam, Isteaq Kabir Sifat, Md. Earfan Ali Khondaker, Md. Kaderi Kibria
    Public Health and Toxicology.2024; 4(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • The beliefs of medical faculty students about thirdhand smoke
    İbrahim Güven Çoşğun, Şule Çilekar, Aydın Balcı, Beyza Nur Köymen, Sena Moral, Batıkan Nur, Berkay Yetim
    Tobacco Induced Diseases.2023; 21(January): 1.     CrossRef
  • Smoking behavior and secondhand smoke exposure among university students in northern Portugal: Relations with knowledge on tobacco use and attitudes toward smoking
    R.F. Alves, J. Precioso, E. Becoña
    Pulmonology.2022; 28(3): 193.     CrossRef
  • A influência dos pares no consumo de Substâncias Psicoativas entre estudantes universitários/as
    Regina Alves, José Precioso
    Revista de Estudios e Investigación en Psicología y Educación.2022; 9: 5.     CrossRef
  • Intention to quit electronic cigarette smoking among university students who are e-cigarette users
    Jina Choo, Songwhi Noh, Jihyun Moon, Jinah Park, Yoonjoo Jeoung, Wonji Song
    Journal of American College Health.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Smoking and its Associated Factors among Adolescent Males in Bangladesh: A Community Survey
    Muhammad Imamuzzaman, Faisal Muhammad, Imdadul Haque, Kawsar Ahmed, Kanij Fatema Mukta, Rine Christopher Reuben, A.B.M. Alauddin Chowdhury, Shahidul Basher
    The Open Public Health Journal.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Dursun Çadirci, Nuray Kivanç Terzi, Ragip Terzi, Fatma Gökşin Cihan
    Central European Journal of Public Health.2021; 29(1): 56.     CrossRef
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    Raphael E. Cuomo, Vidya L. Purushothaman, Jiawei Li, Cortni Bardier, Matthew Nali, Neal Shah, Nick Obradovich, Joshua Yang, Tim K. Mackey
    Frontiers in Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Determinants of cigarette/bidi smoking among youth male in rural Mymensingh of Bangladesh: A cross-sectional study
    K. M. Mustafizur Rahman, Md. Ismail Tareque, Russell Kabir
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(12): e0244335.     CrossRef
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    Ketut Suarjana, Putu Ayu Swandewi Astuti, I Wayan Gede Artawan Eka Putra, Made Kerta Duana, Ketut Hari Mulyawan, Djazuly Chalidyanto, Mochammad Bagus Qomaruddin, Chatarina Umbul Wahyuni
    Journal of Public Health Research.2020; 9(3): jphr.2020.1747.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and predictors of tobacco smoking among university students in Sylhet Division, Bangladesh
    Muhammad Shaikh Hassan, Md Kamrul Hossain, Hafiz T A Khan
    International Health.2019; 11(4): 306.     CrossRef
  • Trajectory of Smoking and Incidence of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease among Korean Young Adult Men
    Yongho Jee, Jooeun Jeon, Joung Hwan Back, Mikyung Ryu, Sung-il Cho
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2019; 16(12): 2219.     CrossRef
Cardiovascular Disease–related Health Beliefs and Lifestyle Issues Among Karen Refugees Resettled in the United States From the Thai-Myanmar (Burma) Border
Akiko Kamimura, Kai Sin, Mu Pye, Hsien-Wen Meng
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(6):386-392.   Published online November 2, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.098
  • 12,380 View
  • 228 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Refugees resettled in the US may be at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, little is known about CVD-related issues among Karen refugees who have migrated to the US from the Thai-Myanmar border. The purpose of this study was to examine CVD-related health beliefs and lifestyle issues among Karen refugees resettled in the US.
Methods
Karen refugees resettled in the US from the Thai-Myanmar border (n=195) participated in a survey study on health beliefs related to CVD, salt intake, physical activity (PA), and smoking in the fall of 2016.
Results
A high-salt diet, physical inactivity, and smoking were major lifestyle problems. Participants who adhered to a low-salt diet considered themselves to be susceptible to CVD. Most participants did not engage in regular PA. Regular PA was associated with less perceived susceptibility to CVD and greater perceived benefits of a healthy lifestyle for decreasing the likelihood of CVD.
Conclusions
Each refugee population may require individualized strategies to promote PA and a healthy diet. Future studies should develop health education programs that are specifically designed for Karen refugees and evaluate such programs. In addition to health education programs on healthy lifestyle choices, tobacco cessation programs seem to be necessary for Karen refugees. At the same time, it is important to foster strategies to increase the utilization of preventive care among this population by promoting free or reduced-fee resources in the community to further promote their health.
Summary

Citations

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  • Health status and Healthcare Access of Southeast Asian refugees in the United States: An integrative review
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    Public Health Nursing.2023; 40(2): 324.     CrossRef
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    Hamed Ahmadinia
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    Gayathri S. Kumar, Jenna A. Beeler, Emma E. Seagle, Emily S. Jentes
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    BMC Public Health.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
Knowledge and Perceptions of Influenza Vaccinations Among College Students in Vietnam and the United States
Akiko Kamimura, Ha N. Trinh, Shannon Weaver, Alla Chernenko, Maziar M. Nourian, Nushean Assasnik, Hanh Nguyen
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(4):268-273.   Published online May 25, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.061
  • 10,631 View
  • 230 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Influenza is a significant worldwide public health issue. Knowledge and perceptions regarding the flu vaccination are associated with whether individuals obtain the vaccination. The purpose of this study was to examine how such perceptions were related to knowledge and self-efficacy regarding influenza and the flu vaccination in Vietnam and the US. Methods: College students (n=932) in Vietnam (n=495) and the US (n=437) completed a self-administered survey regarding knowledge and perceptions of influenza vaccinations in September and October 2016. Results: Vietnamese participants reported significantly lower levels of awareness about flu risk, higher levels of negative attitudes toward flu vaccination, lower levels of knowledge about the flu and vaccination, and lower levels of self-efficacy than US participants. Higher levels of flu and flu vaccination knowledge and self-efficacy regarding general responsible health practices were associated with lower levels of negative perceptions of flu risk and attitudes toward vaccination. At the same time, self-efficacy regarding responsible health practices was associated with higher levels of awareness of flu risk and lower levels of negative attitudes toward vaccination. Self-efficacy regarding exercise was associated with lower levels of perceptions of flu risk and higher levels of negative attitudes toward vaccination. Conclusions: Vietnam could benefit from influenza education based on this comparison with the US. In both countries, knowledge and self-efficacy were found to be important factors influencing perceptions of influenza risk and vaccination.
Summary

Citations

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  • Effects of Vaccine Literacy, Health Beliefs, and Flu Vaccination on Perceived Physical Health Status among Under/Graduate Students
    En-Jung Shon, Lena Lee
    Vaccines.2023; 11(4): 765.     CrossRef
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    Current Problems in Cancer.2021; 45(2): 100646.     CrossRef
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    En-Jung Shon, Siyoung Choe, Lena Lee, Youn Ki
    American Journal of Health Promotion.2021; 35(5): 708.     CrossRef
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    Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica.2021; 100(6): 997.     CrossRef
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Perceived Environmental Pollution and Its Impact on Health in China, Japan, and South Korea
Akiko Kamimura, Bianca Armenta, Maziar Nourian, Nushean Assasnik, Kimiya Nourian, Alla Chernenko
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(3):188-194.   Published online April 27, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.044
  • 10,660 View
  • 248 Download
  • 25 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Environmental pollution is a significant global issue. Both objective (scientifically measured) environmental pollution and perceived levels of pollution are important predictors of self-reported health. The purpose of this study was to compare the associations between perceived environmental pollution and health in China, Japan, and South Korea.
Methods
Data were obtained from the East Asian Social Survey and the Cross-National Survey Data Sets: Health and Society in East Asia, 2010 (n=7938; China, n=3866; Japan, n=2496; South Korea, n=1576).
Results
South Koreans perceived environmental pollution to be the most severe, while Japanese participants perceived environmental pollution to be the least severe. Although the Japanese did not perceive environmental pollution to be very severe, their self-rated physical health was significantly related to perceived environmental pollution, while the analogous relationships were not significant for the Chinese or Korean participants. Better mental health was related to lower levels of perceived air pollution in China, as well as lower levels of perceived all types of pollution in Japan and lower levels of perceived noise pollution in South Korea.
Conclusions
Physical and mental health and individual socio-demographic characteristics were associated with levels of perceived environmental pollution, but with different patterns among these three countries.
Summary

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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health