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The KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD): A Korean Chronic Kidney Disease Cohort
Kook-Hwan Oh, Sue K. Park, Jayoun Kim, Curie Ahn
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(4):313-320.   Published online July 1, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.031
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  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
The KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD) was launched in 2011 with the support of the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency. The study was designed with the aim of exploring the various clinical features and characteristics of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Koreans, and elucidating the risk factors for CKD progression and adverse outcomes of CKD. For the cohort study, nephrologists at 9 tertiary university-affiliated hospitals participated in patient recruitment and follow-up. Biostatisticians and epidemiologists also participated in the basic design and structuring of the study. From 2011 until 2016, the KNOW-CKD Phase I recruited 2238 adult patients with CKD from stages G1 to G5, who were not receiving renal replacement therapy. The KNOW-CKD Phase II recruitment was started in 2019, with an enrollment target of 1500 subjects, focused on diabetic nephropathy and hypertensive kidney diseases in patients with reduced kidney function who are presumed to be at a higher risk of adverse outcomes. As of 2021, the KNOW-CKD investigators have published articles in the fields of socioeconomics, quality of life, nutrition, physical activity, renal progression, cardiovascular disease and outcomes, anemia, mineral bone disease, serum and urine biomarkers, and international and inter-ethnic comparisons. The KNOW-CKD researchers will elaborate a prediction model for various outcomes of CKD such as the development of end-stage kidney disease, major adverse cardiovascular events, and death.
Summary
Korean summary
KNOW-CKD 코호트 연구는 전국적 규모의 다기관 만성콩팥병 장기 추적 코호트 연구로서 2011년 질병관리청의 후원으로 시작된 연구이다. 이 연구는 우리나라 만성콩팥병의 임상적인 경과와 합병증, 신기능 악화 정도와 심혈관계 사건, 사망 등 주요 사건의 발생 위험 요인들을 규명하고자 기획되었다. 궁극적으로 KNOW-CKD 연구는 말기신부전으로의 진행과 사망, 심혈관계 주요 사건 등 만성콩팥병의 예후 예측 모델을 구축하는 것을 목표로 한다.

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  • Kidney Health Plan 2033 in Korea: bridging the gap between the present and the future
    Do Hyoung Kim, Young Youl Hyun, Jin Joo Cha, Sua Lee, Hyun Kyung Lee, Jong Wook Choi, Su-Hyun Kim, Sang Youb Han, Cheol Whee Park, Eun Young Lee, Dae Ryong Cha, Sung Gyun Kim, Chun Soo Lim, Sun-Hee Park
    Kidney Research and Clinical Practice.2024; 43(1): 8.     CrossRef
  • Associations between Chronic Kidney Disease and Migraine Incidence: Findings from a Korean Longitudinal Big Data Study
    Mi Jung Kwon, Jwa-Kyung Kim, Min-Jeong Kim, Dae Myoung Yoo, Na-Eun Lee, Kyeong Min Han, Nan Young Kim, Ho Suk Kang, Hyo Geun Choi, Eun Soo Kim
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2024; 14(4): 356.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics of Patients with Heart Failure and Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease (Stages 4–5) Not Undergoing Renal Replacement Therapy (ERCA-IC Study)
    Sandra Valdivielso Moré, Miren Vicente Elcano, Anna García Alonso, Sergi Pascual Sanchez, Isabel Galceran Herrera, Francesc Barbosa Puig, Laia C. Belarte-Tornero, Sonia Ruiz-Bustillo, Ronald O. Morales Murillo, Clara Barrios, Joan Vime-Jubany, Nuria Farre
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(6): 2339.     CrossRef
Well-being Index Scores and Subjective Health Status of Korean Healthcare Workers
Yoonhee Shin, Bohyun Park, Nam-eun Kim, Eun Jeong Choi, Minsu Ock, Sun Ha Jee, Sue K. Park, Hyeong Sik Ahn, Hyesook Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(3):226-233.   Published online May 31, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.114
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AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
The aim of this study was to evaluate the subjective level of health-related quality of life of Korean healthcare workers using various quality-of-life instruments.
Methods
This study included 992 participants, who were doctors and nurses. A survey was conducted between November 28 and December 4, 2019. Data from 954 participants divided into 3 groups (physicians, residents, and nurses) were analyzed. Four measurement tools (29 questions) were used in the survey to evaluate subjective health status and well-being.
Results
In the Mayo Well-being Index, burnout during work (88.5%) and emotional difficulties caused by work (84.0%) were frequently cited by the respondents. Regarding questions on burnout and emotional difficulties, residents and nurses had the highest scores (91.0 and 89.6%, respectively). Emotional problems, such as anxiety, depression, and irritability, accounted for a high percentage (73.1%) of the total, while 82.2% of respondents reported that their work schedules interfered with their leisure and family time. There was no significant difference among the groups in subjective health status. However, 10.1% of the residents experienced very low quality of life, which was a higher proportion than that of physicians (2.7%) and nurses (5.2%).
Conclusions
The level of well-being that Korean medical workers experienced in relation to work was lower than the results of the United States healthcare workers surveyed using the same tool. This study was unique in that it conducted a subjective quality-of-life survey on Korean healthcare workers.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구의 목적은 다양한 삶의 질 도구를 사용하여 한국 의료종사자들의 건강과 관련된 삶의 질에 대한 주관적인 수준을 평가하는 것이다. 피로와 정서적 어려움, 업무로 인한 일상생활의 방해 등 한국 의료종사자의 일부 삶의 질 점수가 낮았다. 의료 종사자의 소진 경험이 환자의 치료에 부정적인 영향을 미친다는 것을 고려할 때 의료 종사자들의 삶의 질을 향상시키는 정책이 마련되어야하며, 건강과 관련된 직업적 위험요인 연구도 추가적으로 필요하다.
Mainstreaming of Health Equity in Infectious Disease Control Policy During the COVID-19 Pandemic Era
Hongjo Choi, Seong-Yi Kim, Jung-Woo Kim, Yukyung Park, Myoung-Hee Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(1):1-7.   Published online January 15, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.593
  • 5,549 View
  • 309 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
The Korean government’s strategy to combat coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has focused on non-pharmaceutical interventions, such as social distancing and wearing masks, along with testing, tracing, and treatment; overall, its performance has been relatively good compared to that of many other countries heavily affected by COVID-19. However, little attention has been paid to health equity in measures to control the COVID-19 pandemic. The study aimed to examine the unequal impacts of COVID-19 across socioeconomic groups and to suggest potential solutions to tackle these inequalities. The pathways linking social determinants and health could be entry points to tackle the unequal consequences of this public health emergency. It is crucial for infectious disease policy to consider social determinants of health including poor housing, precarious working conditions, disrupted healthcare services, and suspension of social services. Moreover, the high levels of uncertainty and complexity inherent in this public health emergency, as well as the health and socioeconomic inequalities caused by the pandemic, underscore the need for good governance other than top-down measures by the government. We emphasize that a people-centered perspective is a key approach during the pandemic era. Mutual trust between the state and civil society, strong accountability of the government, and civic participation are essential components of cooperative disaster governance.
Summary
Korean summary
"이 연구는 코로나19 대유행이 건강불평등에 미치는 영향을 검토하고, 불평등 완화 방안을 제시하고자 한다. 건강의 사회적 결정요인은 코로나19와 건강불평등을 이해하기 위한 출발점이다. 건강의 사회적 결정요인은 코로나19 감염과 그로 인한 사망 등 직접영향 경로와 코로나19 대응과정의 문제로 건강불평등을 야기하는 간접영향 경로에 모두 관여한다. 공중보건위기로 인한 건강불평등을 줄이기 위해서는 시민참여를 통한 협력적 거버넌스 강화와 모든 건강정책에서 사람중심돌봄의 관점을 견지하는 것이 필요하다."

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Statement on Health Rights in the New Constitution
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(3):145-146.   Published online May 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.19.051
  • 3,662 View
  • 102 Download
AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Summary
Korean summary
헌법에 적극적인 건강권을 규정하는 것은 앞으로 모든 사회구성원의 건강 수준 유지와 보편적 의료보장 달성의 초석이 될 것이다. 따라서 앞으로 개정할 헌법에 사회구성원에 대한 건강권 보장을 국가의 의무로 명확하게 규정하여야 한다.
The Impact of Educational Status on 10-Year (2004-2014) Cardiovascular Disease Prognosis and All-cause Mortality Among Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients in the Greek Acute Coronary Syndrome (GREECS) Longitudinal Study
Venetia Notara, Demosthenes B. Panagiotakos, Yannis Kogias, Petros Stravopodis, Antonis Antonoulas, Spyros Zombolos, Yannis Mantas, Christos Pitsavos
J Prev Med Public Health. 2016;49(4):220-229.   Published online June 24, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.16.005
  • 9,606 View
  • 131 Download
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The association between educational status and 10-year risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and all-cause mortality was evaluated.
Methods
From October 2003 to September 2004, 2172 consecutive ACS patients from six Greek hospitals were enrolled. In 2013 to 2014, a 10-year follow-up (2004-2014) assessment was performed for 1918 participants (participation rate, 88%). Each patient’s educational status was classified as low (<9 years of school), intermediate (9 to 14 years), or high (>14 years).
Results
Overall all-cause mortality was almost twofold higher in the low-education group than in the intermediate-education and high-education groups (40% vs. 22% and 19%, respectively, p<0.001). Additionally, 10-year recurrent ACS events (fatal and non-fatal) were more common in the low-education group than in the intermediate-education and high-education groups (42% vs. 30% and 35%, p<0.001), and no interactions between sex and education on the investigated outcomes were observed. Moreover, patients in the high-education group were more physically active, had a better financial status, and were less likely to have hypertension, diabetes, or ACS than the participants with the least education (p<0.001); however, when those characteristics and lifestyle habits were accounted for, no moderating effects regarding the relationship of educational status with all-cause mortality and ACS events were observed.
Conclusions
A U-shaped association may be proposed for the relationship between ACS prognosis and educational status, with participants in the low-education and high-education groups being negatively affected by other factors (e.g., job stress, depression, or loneliness). Public health policies should be aimed at specific social groups to reduce the overall burden of cardiovascular disease morbidity.
Summary

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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health